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Dates: Last 2 Years

You searched for subject:(Donor Human Milk). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Needels, Maryleah Schultz. Influencing Nurses' Willingness to Advocate for Legislative Healthcare Policy: A Pilot Program.

Degree: DNP, Nursing, 2018, University of San Francisco

Necrotizing enterocolitis is a potential life-threatening condition that is the leading cause of death in premature infants. Overwhelming evidence documents the use of an exclusive human milk diet to potentially decrease the rate of occurrence. Not all mothers are able to produce the necessary breast milk for their neonates. Banked human donor milk has become the gold standard of care however disparities of accessibility exist throughout California due to the lack of a healthcare policy providing insurance coverage for this life saving measure. The aim of this project was to present an educational intervention in a limited amount of time to small groups of maternal child health staff with the goal of increasing knowledge surrounding the benefits of human donor milk and increasing awareness and willingness to advocate for healthcare policy change. The pilot was modeled after the time allotment granted for educating state legislators and will be replicated for future healthcare lobbying efforts. Survey results proved the intervention to be successful in both increasing staff knowledge and willingness to advocate for change. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, human donor milk, policy, nurse advocate Advisors/Committee Members: Brian Budds, ESQ, Nancy W. Selix, DNP, FNP-C, CNM.

Subjects/Keywords: Advocacy; Nurses; Healthcare Policy; Human Donor Milk; Premature Infants; Nursing

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APA (6th Edition):

Needels, M. S. (2018). Influencing Nurses' Willingness to Advocate for Legislative Healthcare Policy: A Pilot Program. (Thesis). University of San Francisco. Retrieved from https://repository.usfca.edu/dnp/145

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Needels, Maryleah Schultz. “Influencing Nurses' Willingness to Advocate for Legislative Healthcare Policy: A Pilot Program.” 2018. Thesis, University of San Francisco. Accessed December 06, 2019. https://repository.usfca.edu/dnp/145.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Needels, Maryleah Schultz. “Influencing Nurses' Willingness to Advocate for Legislative Healthcare Policy: A Pilot Program.” 2018. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Needels MS. Influencing Nurses' Willingness to Advocate for Legislative Healthcare Policy: A Pilot Program. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of San Francisco; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: https://repository.usfca.edu/dnp/145.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Needels MS. Influencing Nurses' Willingness to Advocate for Legislative Healthcare Policy: A Pilot Program. [Thesis]. University of San Francisco; 2018. Available from: https://repository.usfca.edu/dnp/145

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

2. Kwist, Andrew. Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services.

Degree: 2018, University of Washington

Introduction: Infant feeding practices and lactation support when mother’s own milk is unavailable, especially among vulnerable infants in neonate intensive care unit situations (i.e. pre-term, low birthweight) are not well understood globally. Integration of human milk banking services and provision of donor human milk as early essential newborn care may offer the support and resources necessary to achieve optimal infant feeding practices. Previous studies suggest improved breastfeeding rates at discharge with the introduction of an integrated human milk banking program, however this finding has not been well characterized. An impact evaluation is underway to investigate changes in infant feeding practices to increase safe use of human milk from before and after integration of a human milk bank at the Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children in Da Nang, Vietnam. Methods: A pretest and posttest evaluation was conducted surrounding the opening of the human milk bank at the Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children in Da Nang, Vietnam, a WHO-designated Center of Excellence for early essential newborn care. All infants admitted to the neonatal ward on day one of life were included and 14 days of data collection took place on volumes, routes, and types of feed for each infant until discharge or death. Outcomes of interest were exclusive quality-controlled human milk feeding, any exposure to formula, and any exposure to another mother’s milk. Chi-squared tests and the Mantel-Haenszel method were used to investigate the associations between exposure to the milk bank and each outcome of interest. Results: The proportion of infants fed exclusive quality-controlled human milk was significantly higher in the posttest group relative to the pretest group on all 14 days of the study; posttest exclusive quality-controlled human milk feeding was 100% at day 1 and reduced steadily through follow-up to 65% by day 14, while pretest was 4% at day 1 and reached 0% by day 9 (all 2 p<0.001). The proportion of infants exposed to formula was significantly lower in the posttest group than the pretest group during the first seven days of data collection (all 2 p<0.05) and was similar thereafter; posttest exposure to formula was between 0% and 4% throughout follow-up while pretest exposure to formula was 36% at day 1 and reduced to 4% by day 8. The proportion of infants exposed to another mother’s milk was significantly lower in the posttest group compared to the pretest group through day 10 (all 2 p<0.001); posttest exposure to another mother's milk was between 0 and 3% throughout follow-up, while pretest exposure to another mother's milk was 73% at day 1 and reduced throughout follow-up to 4% by day 14. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest a positive impact of the integration of a human milk bank into newborn care services in Vietnam, specifically for an increase in the uptake of quality-controlled human milk and decreases in exposure to formula and another mother’s milk. This study informs future models for integrating human milk… Advisors/Committee Members: Hawes, Stephen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Breastfeeding; Donor human milk; Human milk banking; Infant feeding; Neonatal health; Vietnam; Public health; Nutrition; Epidemiology; Epidemiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kwist, A. (2018). Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kwist, Andrew. “Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services.” 2018. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kwist, Andrew. “Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services.” 2018. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Kwist A. Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kwist A. Feeding practices among vulnerable newborns in Vietnam: a pre- and post-evaluation of integrating a human milk bank into newborn care services. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42337

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Toronto

3. Pitino, Michael A. Investigating Alternative and Emerging Pasteurization Techniques for Human Milk Preservation.

Degree: 2018, University of Toronto

The effect of Holder (62.5°C, 30 minutes), flash-heating (brought to boil), UV-C (250nm, 25 minutes) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP, 500MPa, 8 minutes) pasteurization on human milk composition was studied. Seventeen pools of human milk from different women underwent each of the 4 pasteurization techniques. Macronutrient, vitamin C and folate and bioactive components (bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), lysozyme, and lactoferrin) were measured in raw and pasteurized milk to determine any losses. Bacteriology was carried out to assess the ability of each technique to yield a negative culture (

M.Sc.

2019-07-10 00:00:00

Advisors/Committee Members: O'Connor, Deborah L, Nutritional Sciences.

Subjects/Keywords: Flash-heating; HHP; Holder; Human Donor Milk; Nutrients and Bioactives; UV-C; 0570

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pitino, M. A. (2018). Investigating Alternative and Emerging Pasteurization Techniques for Human Milk Preservation. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95630

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pitino, Michael A. “Investigating Alternative and Emerging Pasteurization Techniques for Human Milk Preservation.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95630.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pitino, Michael A. “Investigating Alternative and Emerging Pasteurization Techniques for Human Milk Preservation.” 2018. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Pitino MA. Investigating Alternative and Emerging Pasteurization Techniques for Human Milk Preservation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95630.

Council of Science Editors:

Pitino MA. Investigating Alternative and Emerging Pasteurization Techniques for Human Milk Preservation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95630

.