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You searched for subject:(Domestic building modelling). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Abedin, Joynal. Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Loughborough University

Residential space and water heating accounts for around 13% of the greenhouse gas emissions of the UK. Reducing this is essential for meeting the national emission reduction target of 80% by 2050 from the 1990 baseline. One of the strategies adopted for achieving this is focused around large scale shift towards electrical heating. This could lead to unsustainable disparity between the daily peak and off-peak electricity loads, large seasonal variation in electricity demands, and challenges of matching the short and long term supply with the demands. These challenges could impact the security and resilience of UK electricity supply, and needs to be addressed. Rechargeable Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in residential buildings can help overcome these challenges by enabling Heat Demand Shifts (HDS) to off-peak times, reducing the magnitude of the peak loads, and the difference between the peak and off-peak loads. To be effective a wide scale uptake of TES would be needed. For this to happen, the benefits and impacts of TES both for the demand side and the supply side have to be explored, which could vary considerably given the diverse physical, thermal, operational and occupancy characteristics of the UK housing stock. A greater understanding of the potential consequence of TES in buildings is necessary. Such knowledge could enable appropriate policy development to help drive the uptake of TES or to encourage development of alternative solutions. Through dynamic building simulation in TRNSYS, this work generated predictions of the space and water heating energy and power demands, and indoor temperature characteristics of the UK housing stock. Twelve building archetypes were created consisting of: Detached, semi-detached, mid-terrace and flat built forms with thermal insulation corresponding to the 1990 building regulation, and occupied floor areas of 70m2, 90m2 and 150m2. Typical occupancy and operational conditions were used to create twelve Base Case scenarios, and simulations performed for 60 winter days from 2nd January. HDS of 2, 3 and 4 hours from the grid peak time of 17:00 were simulated with sensible TES system sizes of 0.25m3, 0.5m3 and 0.75m3, and water storage temperatures of 75°C and 95°C. Parametric analysis were performed to determine the impacts and benefits of: thermal insulation equivalent to 1980, 1990 (Base Case), 2002 and 2010 building regulation; locations of Gatwick (Base Case) and Aberdeen; heating durations of 6, 9 (Base Case), 12 and 16 hours per day; thermostat settings of 19°C, 21°C (Base Case) and 23°C, and number of occupiers of 1 person and 3 persons (Base Case) per household. Good correlation was observed between the simulated results and published heat energy consumption data for buildings with similar thermal, physical, occupancy and operational conditions. The results allowed occupied space temperatures and overall daily and grid peak time energy consumption to be predicted for the range of building archetypes and parameter values considered, and the TES size necessary for a desired HDS…

Subjects/Keywords: 696; Thermal energy storage; Heat demand shifting; Building simulation; Domestic building modelling; Domestic heat storage

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abedin, J. (2017). Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Loughborough University. Retrieved from https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/25520 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.719257

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abedin, Joynal. “Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Loughborough University. Accessed December 10, 2019. https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/25520 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.719257.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abedin, Joynal. “Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts.” 2017. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Abedin J. Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Loughborough University; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/25520 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.719257.

Council of Science Editors:

Abedin J. Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Loughborough University; 2017. Available from: https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/25520 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.719257


Loughborough University

2. Abedin, Joynal. Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Loughborough University

Residential space and water heating accounts for around 13% of the greenhouse gas emissions of the UK. Reducing this is essential for meeting the national emission reduction target of 80% by 2050 from the 1990 baseline. One of the strategies adopted for achieving this is focused around large scale shift towards electrical heating. This could lead to unsustainable disparity between the daily peak and off-peak electricity loads, large seasonal variation in electricity demands, and challenges of matching the short and long term supply with the demands. These challenges could impact the security and resilience of UK electricity supply, and needs to be addressed. Rechargeable Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in residential buildings can help overcome these challenges by enabling Heat Demand Shifts (HDS) to off-peak times, reducing the magnitude of the peak loads, and the difference between the peak and off-peak loads. To be effective a wide scale uptake of TES would be needed. For this to happen, the benefits and impacts of TES both for the demand side and the supply side have to be explored, which could vary considerably given the diverse physical, thermal, operational and occupancy characteristics of the UK housing stock. A greater understanding of the potential consequence of TES in buildings is necessary. Such knowledge could enable appropriate policy development to help drive the uptake of TES or to encourage development of alternative solutions. Through dynamic building simulation in TRNSYS, this work generated predictions of the space and water heating energy and power demands, and indoor temperature characteristics of the UK housing stock. Twelve building archetypes were created consisting of: Detached, semi-detached, mid-terrace and flat built forms with thermal insulation corresponding to the 1990 building regulation, and occupied floor areas of 70m2, 90m2 and 150m2. Typical occupancy and operational conditions were used to create twelve Base Case scenarios, and simulations performed for 60 winter days from 2nd January. HDS of 2, 3 and 4 hours from the grid peak time of 17:00 were simulated with sensible TES system sizes of 0.25m3, 0.5m3 and 0.75m3, and water storage temperatures of 75°C and 95°C. Parametric analysis were performed to determine the impacts and benefits of: thermal insulation equivalent to 1980, 1990 (Base Case), 2002 and 2010 building regulation; locations of Gatwick (Base Case) and Aberdeen; heating durations of 6, 9 (Base Case), 12 and 16 hours per day; thermostat settings of 19°C, 21°C (Base Case) and 23°C, and number of occupiers of 1 person and 3 persons (Base Case) per household. Good correlation was observed between the simulated results and published heat energy consumption data for buildings with similar thermal, physical, occupancy and operational conditions. The results allowed occupied space temperatures and overall daily and grid peak time energy consumption to be predicted for the range of building archetypes and parameter values considered, and the TES size necessary for a desired HDS…

Subjects/Keywords: 696; Thermal energy storage; Heat demand shifting; Building simulation; Domestic building modelling; Domestic heat storage

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abedin, J. (2017). Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Loughborough University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2134/25520

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abedin, Joynal. “Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Loughborough University. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2134/25520.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abedin, Joynal. “Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts.” 2017. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Abedin J. Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Loughborough University; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2134/25520.

Council of Science Editors:

Abedin J. Thermal energy storage in residential buildings : a study of the benefits and impacts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Loughborough University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2134/25520

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