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You searched for subject:(District Office Service). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Carter, Charlotte. District Support of Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: An Evaluation of a Service Culture Program in an Urban, Midwestern School District.

Degree: EdD, 2020, University of Oklahoma

Some scholars believe district offices are primarily a compliance-driven, bureaucratic hindrance to transformational change. Other scholars believe that districts can play a key role in school and student success, but exactly what this role looks like remains very much in question. Particularly in large, urban districts, the focus seems to be more on policy and procedure than achieving interconnectivity among and connection with each one of its schools, its staff, and students. The business sector, on the other hand, has long recognized that knowing and satisfying customer/client needs is a key component of success. To improve teacher perceptions, some districts have begun to initiate service culture programs. Although research exploring the business sector finds that service culture enhanced the quality of service to customers, there is limited research on the effects of service culture in the education sector. Many principals and teachers in a focal urban, Midwestern district, report a disconnect between school sites and district office personnel resulting in a perception among school site staff that district personnel do not care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the design, success measures, and preliminary outcomes related to the implementation of a service culture program in this school district. The primary research question asks, “Did perceptions of service culture among staff change after the implementation of the district’s service culture initiative?” The service culture evaluation design was quantitative. Surveys and sign-in logs were used to measure change in service culture, trust, quality of service, and volunteer participation over time, and were measured prior to the intervention and after the intervention had been in operation for over a year. The researcher found that service culture and trust both declined over the study period, with trust declining more sharply. However, perceptions of service quality and volunteer participation, two other important intervention outcomes, grew over the study period. Advisors/Committee Members: Ford, Timothy (advisor), Lloyd-Jones, Brenda (committee member), Adams, Curt (committee member), Ballard, Keith (committee member), Edwards, Beverely (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Service Culture; Customer Service; District Office Service; Central Office Customer Service; Education Customer Experience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carter, C. (2020). District Support of Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: An Evaluation of a Service Culture Program in an Urban, Midwestern School District. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324390

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carter, Charlotte. “District Support of Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: An Evaluation of a Service Culture Program in an Urban, Midwestern School District.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324390.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carter, Charlotte. “District Support of Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: An Evaluation of a Service Culture Program in an Urban, Midwestern School District.” 2020. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Carter C. District Support of Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: An Evaluation of a Service Culture Program in an Urban, Midwestern School District. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2020. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324390.

Council of Science Editors:

Carter C. District Support of Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: An Evaluation of a Service Culture Program in an Urban, Midwestern School District. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324390


RMIT University

2. Haryanto, A. Improving service quality of district education offices in Indonesian decentralized education system.

Degree: 2010, RMIT University

Decentralization of education administration is becoming a common thread in public governance as more developing and developed countries are trying to implement it in order to devolve some of their educational decision making processes. Precipitated by the economic and political crisis at the end of President Suharto regime in 1998 Indonesia passed its first decentralization law in 1999 (Law 22/1999). Not only strongly impelled by internal forces such as competing regions demanding more authority in managing natural resources, the country was also pressured by external forces, especially the International Monetary Fund in relation to debt resolution. Indonesia was given little alternative and was forced to decentralize most of its governing authorities (excluding defense, religious, security, fiscal, judicial, and foreign affairs) to local government. As a result of this ‘big bang’ policy, Indonesia was unable to prepare for and implement the decentralization process smoothly. District Education Offices which received the bulk of decentralized education authority were not properly prepared to exercise their new and bigger mandates. Their organizational structure, personnel capacity, managerial skills and, most importantly, their capacity to provide for school needs were not properly prepared in advance. As a consequence, the implementation process was fluid, complex and, sometimes, confusing to local personnel and managers. Ironically, improved service quality as one of the main motives behind decentralization was neglected, if not sacrificed. In the Indonesian context, especially at District Education Office level, service quality is the District Education Office’s ability to fulfill its obligatory functions to satisfy school needs. Delivering services depends on many different factors. In this research, respondents also perceived these factors in many different ways, but in relation to District Education Office mandates, it is easier to use a system approach covering input, process, output, and evaluation. The three elements are combined in a Minimum Service Standards discussed in this research. Improving District Education Offices service quality certainly should involve improving all of the above mentioned factors. Targeted capacity building along with regular service quality assessment is two key strategies for improving District Education Offices service quality. Providing all the needed resources for District Education Offices and providing adequate training for its personnel is two important steps in capacity building. In addition, regular evaluation is needed to ensure that District Education Offices service quality keeps improving. In this case, service standards such as Standar Pelayanan Minimal or Minimum Service Standards are needed. The latest Government of Indonesia Minimum Service Standards as an instrument to assure District Education Offices service quality is considered no longer adequate. A new set of Minimum Service Standards as proposed by this research is…

Subjects/Keywords: Fields of Research; Improving Service; Service Quality; District Education Office; District Service Quality; Indonesian Decentralization; Education Decentralization; Decentralization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haryanto, A. (2010). Improving service quality of district education offices in Indonesian decentralized education system. (Thesis). RMIT University. Retrieved from http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:9481

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haryanto, A. “Improving service quality of district education offices in Indonesian decentralized education system.” 2010. Thesis, RMIT University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:9481.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haryanto, A. “Improving service quality of district education offices in Indonesian decentralized education system.” 2010. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Haryanto A. Improving service quality of district education offices in Indonesian decentralized education system. [Internet] [Thesis]. RMIT University; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:9481.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haryanto A. Improving service quality of district education offices in Indonesian decentralized education system. [Thesis]. RMIT University; 2010. Available from: http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:9481

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.