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You searched for subject:(Devil possession). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of South Africa

1. MacDonald, Scott Douglas. A critical analysis of Byang Kato’s demonology and its theological relevance for an evangelical demonology .

Degree: 2017, University of South Africa

What composes an Evangelical demonology? This dissertation aims to provide a fresh Evangelical demonology, reflecting and systematizing the biblical material on the demonic. To begin the process, Byang Kato’s background and demonology is examined, since Kato himself has a unique relationship to demonic practices by virtue of his upbringing. His demonological efforts are headlined by a booklet on the spirits, and throughout the rest of Kato’s theological output, Satan and his wicked comrades are frequently mentioned. Overall, Kato’s work presents timely contributions for our demonological goals, especially considering the multicultural context. In an increasingly intermingled world, with many backgrounds being represented in multicultural Christian communities, Kato’s demonology is a superior model. Human perceptions concerning the demonic are often inseparable from prevailing cultural attitudes, and the temptation to exalt one’s own culture must be avoided, especially due to the new norm of multicultural churches, para-church organizations, and seminaries. Kato’s demonology gravitates to the biblical material, and thus it delivers both challenges and affirmations to every party. Furthermore, Kato’s writings on the demonic are inherently linked to soteriology. After discerning some of the major themes of Kato’s soteriology, his exclusivism (and how it relates to demonology) is specifically discussed. Since Kato views the world outside of Christ as the dominion of Satan and the demonic, he advocates that one must turn to Christ for redemption. Then an Evangelical demonology itself is constructed. After highlighting particular contributions from Kato, criteria are outlined for the project before launching into the primary content. Demonic activity throughout the Bible is surveyed, and the argument is offered that demons do act as malevolent personal beings intent on instigating evil in the created order. Through this study of the demonic, the assertion that “demonology matters” is presented, as the doctrine of the demonic relates to the reliability of the Bible and the quality of our salvation. A biblical, Evangelical demonology also rises to modern challenges, including skepticism and speculation. Christians are planted on the sure ground of the Scriptures, prepared for the spiritual realities of the world in which we live. Advisors/Committee Members: Dolamo, Ramathate Tseka Hosea (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Demonology; Demons; Demonization; Devil; Spirits; Pneumatatology; Necromancy; Multiculturalism; Evangelicalism; Byang Kato; Occultism; Possession; Exorcism; Satan; Satanology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

MacDonald, S. D. (2017). A critical analysis of Byang Kato’s demonology and its theological relevance for an evangelical demonology . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of South Africa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10500/22276

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

MacDonald, Scott Douglas. “A critical analysis of Byang Kato’s demonology and its theological relevance for an evangelical demonology .” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Africa. Accessed October 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10500/22276.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

MacDonald, Scott Douglas. “A critical analysis of Byang Kato’s demonology and its theological relevance for an evangelical demonology .” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

MacDonald SD. A critical analysis of Byang Kato’s demonology and its theological relevance for an evangelical demonology . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of South Africa; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/22276.

Council of Science Editors:

MacDonald SD. A critical analysis of Byang Kato’s demonology and its theological relevance for an evangelical demonology . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of South Africa; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10500/22276


University of Helsinki

2. Pöysälä, Tuomas. From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700.

Degree: Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies; Helsingfors universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för filosofi, historia, kultur- och konstforskning, 2017, University of Helsinki

The purpose of this study is to create a comprehensive picture of exorcisms performed on the British Isles between 1550 – 1700. By reading all of the pamphlets from England, Scotland and Ireland that include exorcism narratives, a much more varied picture is formed when compared to older studies. The end of the 16th century saw a growing conflict between the Calvin-leaning Church of England, Luther-leaning Puritans and the Roman Catholics regarding the performance of exorcisms. The Church of England saw exorcisms as an example of 'popish' superstition and denied the possibility of successful exorcisms. The dissenting sect of Puritans wanted to modernize the rite from superstitious influences and the Catholics saw the performance of exorcisms as a way to convert the laity back to the Catholic faith. The pamphlets published during the late 16th century are mostly polemic and contain extensive prefaces detailing the author's stance regarding exorcism. The Church of England was able to solidify its power and effectively disallow the clergy from performing exorcisms and drive out the Catholics at the start of the 17th century and effectively stopped the publication of both witchcraft and exorcism pamphlets as a result. However, the creation of a Protestant unity had not been succesful. The Catholic connections of King Charles I, the following civil war and interregnum around the middle point of the 17th century caused a fragmentation of religious unity and made witchcraft fears increase once again. Witchcraft pamphlet publishing saw a revival first, followed a decade later by new exorcism pamphlets. As the clerical exorcisms were still seen as 'popish' superstition, the exorcists of these new pamphlets came from the laity and medical professions. Superstitious 'white magic' cures performed by the laity, cunning-folk as they were known, made up a large portion of healing during the early modern era, so they also had to deal with demonic possession and witchcraft quite often. The witchcraft trials of England and Scotland were secular affairs due to legislation, and usually involved medical professionals in order to distinguish between natural and supernatural symptoms. Thus medical professionals had a working understanding of possession and made up the majority of the late 17th century exorcists. The fragmentation of the authority on exorcism methods in England, as opposed to the Catholic continent, meant that both the performers and the methodology became mixed; elements of old conjuration magic, superstitious spells and medicine were used side by side. The later pamphlets either told of miraculous events and cures or advertised the accomplishments of various physicians. The very end of the 17th century saw the release of heavily sceptical pamphlets, as the scepticism towards the supernatural in English society was at its highest. The most revealing were the mentions of unsuccessful exorcism attempts that usually preceded the main exorcist’s successful attempt. The pamphlets, whether they told of actual events or were…

Subjects/Keywords: Demons; Devil; Early Modern Era; Exorcism; Exorcists; Illness; Medicine; Pamphlets; Polemics; Possession; Reformation; Roman Catholicism; Superstitions; General History; Yleinen historia; Allmän historia; Demons; Devil; Early Modern Era; Exorcism; Exorcists; Illness; Medicine; Pamphlets; Polemics; Possession; Reformation; Roman Catholicism; Superstitions

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pöysälä, T. (2017). From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700. (Masters Thesis). University of Helsinki. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pöysälä, Tuomas. “From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Helsinki. Accessed October 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pöysälä, Tuomas. “From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Pöysälä T. From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Helsinki; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254.

Council of Science Editors:

Pöysälä T. From Virgin Mary to Rosemary – Early Modern Exorcists and their Methods on the British Isles, 1550-1700. [Masters Thesis]. University of Helsinki; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/177254

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