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You searched for subject:(Dendrite Inhibition). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Crandall, Shane. Dendritic properties of inhibitory thalamic neurons: implications in sub-cortical sensory processing.

Degree: PhD, 0323, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation is focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying thalamocortical network activities. Specifically, I am interested in how inhibitory neurons of the thalamus process information received from other neurons before passing it along to other network targets. Like many neurons in the central nervous system, inhibitory neurons of the thalamus receive thousands of synaptic inputs from other neurons, most of which contact their treelike extensions called dendrites. When these inputs are activated they create electrical signals that travel across the dendrites. If the signals are strong enough, the neuron will generate action potentials, thereby communicating the information to other neurons. The process of turning input into output is often referred to as “synaptic integration” and is a fundamental process performed by all neurons. I believe understanding how information integration occurs within the dendrites of inhibitory thalamic neurons, as it relates to their organization within the network, will provide valuable insight as to the function of inhibition during thalamocortical activities. The importance of this work lies in the fact that brain processes such as sensory perception, behavioral arousal, attention, and certain pathophysiological conditions such as epilepsy result from the coordinated activities of inhibitory and excitatory neurons in the thalamocortical circuit. In Chapter 1, I provide the reader with a comprehensive review of the research literature examining inhibitory thalamic neurons. The information presented in this chapter provides a detailed background of my completed studies (Chapter 2, 3, and 4). My initial study (Chapter 2) demonstrates that in thalamic reticular neurons, voltage-gated T-type calcium channels, located in distal dendrites, function to amplify excitatory afferent inputs. This powerful dendritic property ensures integration of distal input at the somatic level by compensating for any attenuation that would otherwise normally occur due to passive membrane properties. Given the unique voltage-sensitivity of the T-type calcium channel, our data suggests that the degree in which synaptic input would be “boosted” would strictly depends on the voltage-state of the somatodendritic axis. Moreover, if we consider the unique structural organization of the thalamic reticular nucleus, we hypothesize that such dendritic properties could facilitate intra- and cross-modal sensory integration at the level of the thalamus. This study is published in the Journal of Neuroscience. In my second study (Chapter 3), I show that the presynaptic dendrites of thalamic interneurons operate as independent input-output devices. This unique property allows the dendrites of thalamic interneurons to tightly regulate fast monosynaptic excitation in thalamocortical relay neurons. Given dendritic terminals operate independently of the axon and presumably each other, these results suggest that thalamic interneurons can function as multiplexing integrators. This study is published in… Advisors/Committee Members: Cox, Charles L. (advisor), Cox, Charles L. (Committee Chair), Grosman, Claudio F. (committee member), Pandya, Pritesh K. (committee member), Llano, Daniel A. (committee member), Chung, Hee Jung (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus; thalamic reticular nucleus; T-type calcium channels; presynaptic dendrite; local inhibition; whole cell recording; glutamate uncaging; two photon imaging; dendrite; glutamate receptor; feedforward inhibition; thalamus; interneuron

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crandall, S. (2012). Dendritic properties of inhibitory thalamic neurons: implications in sub-cortical sensory processing. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31947

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crandall, Shane. “Dendritic properties of inhibitory thalamic neurons: implications in sub-cortical sensory processing.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31947.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crandall, Shane. “Dendritic properties of inhibitory thalamic neurons: implications in sub-cortical sensory processing.” 2012. Web. 29 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Crandall S. Dendritic properties of inhibitory thalamic neurons: implications in sub-cortical sensory processing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31947.

Council of Science Editors:

Crandall S. Dendritic properties of inhibitory thalamic neurons: implications in sub-cortical sensory processing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31947


University of Michigan

2. Ho, Szushen. Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanocomposites for Energy Applications.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2011, University of Michigan

In the dissertation we utilized the versatility of layer-by-layer assembly to explore the possibilities of improving membrane characteristics in energy-related applications using such technique. Nanocomposite membranes comprising common polymers and state-of-art nanomaterials were fabricated by LBL technique. Physical and electrochemical properties, as well as performance in actual energy devices were intensively investigated. In fuel cell applications, Pt nanoparticle decorated carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers were manufactured into freestanding membranes for the use in fuel cell MEAs. SWNT and CF in LBL membranes formed extensive percolation networks and contributed to enhanced electronic and proton conductivities. Platinum nanoparticles deposited on the sidewalls of SWNT and CF incorporated with Nafion significantly increased the number of catalysis sites and improved the accessibility to TPBs. Substantially improvement in performance and catalyst utilization was recorded. Thick and uniform zeolite membranes were also created by LBL means. Zeolite-L modified electrodes showed signal enhancement in ferrocyanide redox reaction. By investigating the physiosorption and transport behavior at the electrodes, we proposed that although redox species couldn't diffuse freely in and out the channel due to size restriction, the adsorption of redox species inside the PDDA/zeolite-L membranes changed the concentration profile dramatically in the vicinity of the electrode surface. The active electron/hole conducting nature inside unidirectional channels in zeolite-L nanocrystals also contributed to the increase of active redox surface area. Lastly, a new generation of ionic conducting nanocomposite membranes for lithium batteries was presented. Through layer-by-layer assembly of ionic conducting PEO and robust fibrous polymer Kevlar, the resulting membranes exhibited superior mechanical strength, high flexibility, and good conductivity. Mechanical strength and modulus of PEO-Kevlar ICMs are the key factors for lithium dendrite suppression, and were estimated to be orders higher than conventional polymer electrolytes. Special inhibition of re-crystallization in PEO phase by LBL technique indicates wider and higher working temperature window. Although the mechanical properties of the PEO-Kevlar membranes manufactured in this study did not reach the theoretical value for complete dendrite suppression, the results represent a step closer to next generation high capacity high power lithium batteries. Advisors/Committee Members: Kotov, Nicholas (committee member), Kieffer, John (committee member), Monroe, Charles W. (committee member), Thompson Jr, Levi T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Layer-by-Layer Assembly; Nanocomposite Membranes; Lithium Battery; Zeolite-L; Ionic Conductivity; Dendrite Inhibition; Chemical Engineering; Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ho, S. (2011). Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanocomposites for Energy Applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/84629

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ho, Szushen. “Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanocomposites for Energy Applications.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed September 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/84629.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ho, Szushen. “Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanocomposites for Energy Applications.” 2011. Web. 29 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Ho S. Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanocomposites for Energy Applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/84629.

Council of Science Editors:

Ho S. Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanocomposites for Energy Applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/84629

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