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You searched for subject:(Deep reflective process). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Levine, Mary Anne. Transforming Experiences: a Reflective Topical Autobiography of Facilitating Student Nurse Development Through International Immersion Programmes.

Degree: 2006, Victoria University of Wellington

The focus of this study is the impact of an international education programme on baccalaureate nursing students taken by me, their teacher/professor, to become immersed in another culture. This is an unusual undertaking for a nursing education programme but it is one to which I have been passionately committed for more than 20 years. This study examines my life-work in a deeply reflective and narrative way. I have used many sources of data to assist in the creation of my story including the framework of Moustakas (1990) and Reflective Topical Autobiography as described by Johnstone (1999). My story is woven throughout this thesis as I gradually reveal more of myself as I feel that who I am should be a continuous thread that lends credence to multiple sections of this work. Several of my reflective stories about the immersion programme experiences, called here, vignettes are included, so that my reflections, thoughts, and feelings can be expressed. “I didn’t have to create the world I wrote about it. I realized that words could tell. [sic] That there was such a thing as an emotional sentence” (Lorde, 1984, p. 85). The genesis of the emotional sentence emerged through the use of interviews with student participants and my own introspective process. In this way I came to a new understanding of myself and my passion for this way of working. I found that these educational experiences had the ability to change the personal and professional lives of participants. Students’ world views expanded exponentially as the true-life experiences in which they actively participated nurtured a profound metamorphosis. It is important to recognise the critical social nature of this work. I have carefully considered the issues of class and gender, poverty and powerlessness, and the inherent dialectic as key elements in the reflective process. The awareness of these social issues coupled with profound personal changes that occurred when immersed in another culture frame the contribution of this work to the profession of nursing in general and to midwifery specifically. In addition, I have been changed. My “way of being” has become radically different. I realise that I facilitate life transformation for participants by providing the platform; I realise the connection, potency, and power of student-teacher relationships; and most of all I learned that I teach from the heart. Advisors/Committee Members: Foureur, Maralyn.

Subjects/Keywords: Cultural immersion; Nursing education; Self-reflective; Personal experience; Midwifery education; Reflective practice; The emotional sentence; Reflective topical autobiography; Deep reflective process; Personal stories

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Levine, M. A. (2006). Transforming Experiences: a Reflective Topical Autobiography of Facilitating Student Nurse Development Through International Immersion Programmes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/52

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Levine, Mary Anne. “Transforming Experiences: a Reflective Topical Autobiography of Facilitating Student Nurse Development Through International Immersion Programmes.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/52.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Levine, Mary Anne. “Transforming Experiences: a Reflective Topical Autobiography of Facilitating Student Nurse Development Through International Immersion Programmes.” 2006. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Levine MA. Transforming Experiences: a Reflective Topical Autobiography of Facilitating Student Nurse Development Through International Immersion Programmes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/52.

Council of Science Editors:

Levine MA. Transforming Experiences: a Reflective Topical Autobiography of Facilitating Student Nurse Development Through International Immersion Programmes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/52

2. Martin, Heather Edwina. Marking Space: a Literary Psychogeography of the Practice of a Nurse Artist.

Degree: 2006, Victoria U of Wellington : Dissertations

The thesis as a production of disciplined work presented in a creative style is congruent with performance and presentation best practice in community arts. As a practising nurse artist I create spaces of alternate ordering within the mental health field environment. I also inhabit the marginal space of the artist working in hospital environments. This Other Place neither condones nor denies the existence of the mental health field environment as it is revealed. Yet, it seeks to find an alternative to the power and subjectivity of the [social] control of people with an experience of mental illness that inhabit this place both voluntarily and involuntarily. I have used a variety of texts to explore the experience and concept of Otherness. The poems are intended to take you, as a reader where you could not perhaps emotionally and physically go, or might have never envisaged going. They also allow me as the author to more fully describe the Otherness of place that is neither the consumer story nor the nurse’s notation, but somewhere alternately ordered to these two spaces. Drawing on the heuristic research approaches of Moustakas and literary psychogeography , particularly the work of Guy Debord, this thesis creates the space to explore the possibilities of resistance and change and the emergence of the identity of the nurse artist within the mental health field environment. Advisors/Committee Members: Alavi, Christine, Duke, Jan.

Subjects/Keywords: Mental health; Reflective practice; Psychogeography; Topical autobiography; Deep reflective process; Text, poetry, painted images

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martin, H. E. (2006). Marking Space: a Literary Psychogeography of the Practice of a Nurse Artist. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria U of Wellington : Dissertations. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/118

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martin, Heather Edwina. “Marking Space: a Literary Psychogeography of the Practice of a Nurse Artist.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria U of Wellington : Dissertations. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/118.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martin, Heather Edwina. “Marking Space: a Literary Psychogeography of the Practice of a Nurse Artist.” 2006. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Martin HE. Marking Space: a Literary Psychogeography of the Practice of a Nurse Artist. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria U of Wellington : Dissertations; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/118.

Council of Science Editors:

Martin HE. Marking Space: a Literary Psychogeography of the Practice of a Nurse Artist. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria U of Wellington : Dissertations; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/118


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Ramsamy, Krishnasamy. Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography.

Degree: 2006, Victoria University of Wellington

The oppression of colonization lives on in the daily lives of colonized people. It is vital for us as nurses to understand the effects of that oppression, as well as the restrictive impacts, and dislocation from one's land and culture to-day. Nurses come from both the descendants of colonisers and the colonised. This thesis is a journey and a quest for insights into the impacts and significances of colonisation by looking at historical and socio-political contexts that have bearing on the health of colonised people who remain mostly powerless and marginalized. It is prompted in response to a cultural safety model which advocates that nurses should become familiar with their own background and history in order to be culturally safe in practice. This reflective autobiographical account is a personal effort and provides the foundation for an exploration of issues during nursing practice encounters, from a colonised ethnic minority perspective. The method was informed by Moustakas research approach and Johnstone's Reflective Topical Autobiographical process. The selection of specific events are deliberate, to make visible some of the many barriers that exist within our health structures as pertinent issues for non-dominant cultures that remain on the margin of our society. Maori issues provide a contrast and became a catalyst for me as the author while working for kaupapa Maori services in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The intention of this thesis is to generate new knowledge about what it means to be a nurse from an ethnic minority working in a kaupapa Maori mental health service, and to encourage other nurses to explore these issues further. Some recommendations are made for nurses in the last chapter, as I believe that they are ideally situated to build upon the strengths indigenous people already have and contribute positively toward the improvement of poor health outcomes of the colonized people in an embracing and collective way. Advisors/Committee Members: Bickley, Joy, Phillips, Brian, McEldowney, Rose.

Subjects/Keywords: Social conditioning; Nursing practice; Mental health; Cultural safety; Reflective practice; Maori mental health service; Kaupapa maori services; Reflective topical autobiography; Deep reflective process; Personal story

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramsamy, K. (2006). Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramsamy, Krishnasamy. “Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramsamy, Krishnasamy. “Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography.” 2006. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Ramsamy K. Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramsamy K. Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60

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