Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

Dates: Last 2 Years

You searched for subject:(David Jones). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Cambridge

1. Assaly, Alex Michael. Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Cambridge

In “Art in Relation to War,” David Jones makes a terse, but stimulating comment on art and the creative process: “An act of art is essentially a gratuitous act. [...] It is essentially ‘play.’” The aim of this dissertation is to examine Jones’s work in relation to the concept of playfulness. Although it makes the most of play’s various associations (pleasure, joyousness, games, children’s play), this dissertation uses the word to describe an activity that is gratuitous (that serves no end other than itself) and, moreover, that is paradoxically material and immaterial, rule-bound (containing aesthetic, intellectual, and theoretical constraints) and free, at once. By approaching Jones’s poetic and visual work by way of the word play, this dissertation provides a model of interpretation that is new to Jones studies and puts pressure on the serious and statement-driven modes of interpretation often used by his readers. “Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play” begins with an Introduction that examines the working sense of play that emerges in Jones’s essays and letters. After defining play as a gratuitous act, this introductory chapter positions Jones’s sense of the word in relation to his Catholic beliefs and, later, to the playful aspects of his subjective life, particularly his child-like behaviour and what Donald Winnicott would describe as his issues around personal attachment and development. Additionally, this chapter provides the reader with a definition and history of play, touching upon various theoretical uses of the word by thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Schiller. Chapter 1 then considers play in the context of aesthetic interpretation. The chapter examines the ways that Jones’s reviewers have applied constricting models of interpretation to his poetic and visual work and culminates in analyses of Paul Fussell and Elizabeth Ward’s unsympathetic studies of Jones. The chapter then ends by defining a mode of interpretation that is essentially playful and creative and, in turn, better suited to Jones’s own sense of his ideal readership. Building off of Chapter 1, Chapter 2 examines the “sacramental scholarship” that has developed around Jones. The chapter puts pressure on theologically strict applications of the words “sacrament” and “signum efficax” to Jones’s art and suggests that there is a crucial fissure between his beliefs and his artistic pursuits. Chapter 3 then turns to his art. The chapter draws attention to his early visual art, finding a connection between theories of children’s art and the styles he developed in the 1920s and 30s. Chapter 4 considers the stylistic play of In Parenthesis, using the amateurish behaviour of the book’s protagonist as a model by which to approach the book’s verbivocovisual experimentations in form. Chapter 5 looks at The Anathemata and, in particular, Jones’s understanding of the playfulness of the creative process. After considering the relationship between the trope of the game and mythopoetic conceptions of time, it turns to Jones’s…

Subjects/Keywords: David Jones; Play; Playfulness; Caritas; Meaning; In Parenthesis; The Anathemata; Dying Gaul; Children's Art; Kettle's Yard

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Assaly, A. M. (2019). Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Assaly, Alex Michael. “Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed September 26, 2020. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Assaly, Alex Michael. “Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play.” 2019. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Assaly AM. Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188.

Council of Science Editors:

Assaly AM. Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188


University of Melbourne

2. Homewood, Penelope Jane. The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today.

Degree: 2019, University of Melbourne

The purpose of this thesis is to provide new insights into how Melbourne was transformed between the late 1960s and the mid-1980s and understand how the lessons learnt from this work, along with a contemporary perspective on the urban condition, can assist the future planning and design of a more sustainable Melbourne. Archival research and interviews with politicians, academics and activists involved in Melbourne’s transformation over the research period under consideration, illustrate the important role urban design thinking and community-led activism had on driving the radical social, political and economic agenda that reshaped the city and led to inner Melbourne’s renowned liveability. Through outlining the cultural, socio-economic and political conditions over the study period, the thesis brings to light the planning theory and ideology of the time to provide a theoretical context for Melbourne’s evolution. When cities grow and change, it is not a linear or logical narrative but rather a dynamic story of overlays, interfaces and integration of place, people and politics. It is a story more complex than eclecticism, far removed from a set of procedures or rules. Melbourne’s transformation reflects the work of city planners who built on what was intrinsic to inner Melbourne, while being informed by highly active community activists, local residents, academics, students, politicians and professional bodies. The research outlines that urban change between the late 1960s and mid-1980s emerged with radical social change and there was a close interrelationship of ideology, geography, planning, culture and politics. A large consortium of people decided they were going to change the course of the city, and they did. Melbourne’s liveability is under threat of continuing decline as the city grows. There remains a tension between the rate of growth and the development models to accommodate this growth. The appropriate role and degree of government and community intervention in planning, and the role of the development market driving urban change, are in contention. Government is pushed by the development industry to make planning processes more efficient, faster and more streamlined. This pressure is compounded by the state government’s reliance on income generated from growth. While it is acknowledged that in this urban age, cities are increasingly important to drive economic development and create wealth, growth for growth’s sake will not sustain a great city. As championed by the city planners, politicians, academics and activists involved in Melbourne’s transformation over the research period, Melbourne’s growth must be in the best interests of all its citizens, driven by planning policies and strategies that enable those interests to be realised. The ‘radicals’ at the time of transformation sought a socially just society where urban planning was based on humanistic and ecological principles, informed by the daily experience of people who lived in the place. These ideals empowered a new breed of politicians at…

Subjects/Keywords: inner Melbourne; urban transformation; urbanism; urban renewal; urban activism; urban design; urban radicals; urban growth; urban history; Ruth and Maurie Crow; Gough Whitlam; John Cain; Evan Walker; David Yencken; planning of Melbourne; City of Melbourne; Ron Jones; Rob Adams; Lecki Ord; future Melbourne

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Homewood, P. J. (2019). The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Homewood, Penelope Jane. “The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Homewood, Penelope Jane. “The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today.” 2019. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Homewood PJ. The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590.

Council of Science Editors:

Homewood PJ. The Authorship of Space: The role of key individuals in the transformation of inner Melbourne from the late 1960’s to the mid-1980s and lessons learnt for today. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/235590

.