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You searched for subject:(Darul Islam). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Australian National University

1. Temby, Quinton. Jihadists Assemble: The Rise of Militant Islamism in Southeast Asia .

Degree: 2017, Australian National University

Following the attacks of September 11, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings in Indonesia the following year, Southeast Asia came under scrutiny for its role in the rise of militant Islamism. Generally, scholarship on militant Islamism in Southeast Asia branched into two approaches: terrorism experts tended to see the problem through the prism of al- Qaeda, with Southeast Asian jihadists following orders from their leaders outside the region; Indonesia specialists, meanwhile, countered this al-Qaeda-centric approach by emphasising the local Indonesian factors driving Southeast Asian jihadism. In this thesis, by contrast, I focus on the regional scale. I find that Southeast Asia, for a time, emerged as one of the most important places in the world for the mobilization of global jihadist attacks against the West due to a historical and geographical process unique to the region. Drawing on the emerging field of assemblage theory, I argue that over time a regional jihadist assemblage formed in Southeast Asia—a cross-border constellation of networks, groups, and material elements—and that it was the mobilization opportunities presented by this assemblage that made Southeast Asia so attractive to global jihadists. Analysing a wealth of original interview and documentary material, I trace the gradual development of this regional assemblage over time and space, from its origins in the cycles of conflict between jihadists and the state in Indonesia in the late 1940s to the crucial role played by Southeast Asians in the attacks of 9/11.

Subjects/Keywords: Southeast Asia; Indonesia; Islam; Islamism; terrorism; assemblage; jihadism; Jemaah Islamiyah; Darul Islam

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APA (6th Edition):

Temby, Q. (2017). Jihadists Assemble: The Rise of Militant Islamism in Southeast Asia . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/135764

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Temby, Quinton. “Jihadists Assemble: The Rise of Militant Islamism in Southeast Asia .” 2017. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/135764.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Temby, Quinton. “Jihadists Assemble: The Rise of Militant Islamism in Southeast Asia .” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Temby Q. Jihadists Assemble: The Rise of Militant Islamism in Southeast Asia . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/135764.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Temby Q. Jihadists Assemble: The Rise of Militant Islamism in Southeast Asia . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/135764

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Universiteit Utrecht

2. Mas, A.P. De. Veenbrand in de archipel Islamitisch geïnspireerd geweld in Indonesië: Darul Islam, Laskar Jihad en Jema’ah Islamiyah in de periode 1945-2010.

Degree: 2010, Universiteit Utrecht

Subjects/Keywords: Letteren; Indonesia, terrorism, Laskar Jihad, Jemaah Islamiyah, Darul Islam

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mas, A. P. D. (2010). Veenbrand in de archipel Islamitisch geïnspireerd geweld in Indonesië: Darul Islam, Laskar Jihad en Jema’ah Islamiyah in de periode 1945-2010. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/178917

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mas, A P De. “Veenbrand in de archipel Islamitisch geïnspireerd geweld in Indonesië: Darul Islam, Laskar Jihad en Jema’ah Islamiyah in de periode 1945-2010.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/178917.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mas, A P De. “Veenbrand in de archipel Islamitisch geïnspireerd geweld in Indonesië: Darul Islam, Laskar Jihad en Jema’ah Islamiyah in de periode 1945-2010.” 2010. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Mas APD. Veenbrand in de archipel Islamitisch geïnspireerd geweld in Indonesië: Darul Islam, Laskar Jihad en Jema’ah Islamiyah in de periode 1945-2010. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2010. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/178917.

Council of Science Editors:

Mas APD. Veenbrand in de archipel Islamitisch geïnspireerd geweld in Indonesië: Darul Islam, Laskar Jihad en Jema’ah Islamiyah in de periode 1945-2010. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2010. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/178917


University of New South Wales

3. Kilcullen, David J. The political consequences of military operations in Indonesia 1945-99 : a fieldwork analysis of the political power-diffusion effects of guerilla conflict.

Degree: Politics, 2000, University of New South Wales

Problem Investigated.This dissertation is a study of the political effects of low-intensity warfare in Indonesia since 1945. In particular, it examines the interaction between general principles and contextual variables in guerrilla conflict, to determine whether such conflict causes the diffusion of political power.Analysis of insurgent movements indicates that power structures within a guerrilla group tend to be regionalised, diffuse and based on multiple centres of roughly equal authority. Conversely, studies of counter-insurgency (COIN) techniques indicate that successful COIN depends on effective political control over the local population. This tends to be exercised by regional or local military commanders rather than by central authority. Based on this, the author’s initial analysis indicated that one should expect to see a diffusion of political authority from central leaders (whether civilian or military) to regional military leaders, when a society is engaged in the conduct of either COIN or guerrilla warfare.The problem investigated in this dissertation can therefore be stated thus:To what extent, at which levels of analysis and subject to what influencing factors does low-intensity warfare in Indonesia between 1945 and 1999 demonstrate a political power-diffusion effect?Procedures Followed.The procedure followed was a diachronic, qualitative, fieldwork-based analysis of two principle case studies: the Darul Islam insurgency in West Java 1948-1962 and the campaign in East Timor 1974-1999. Principle research tools were:• Semi-structured, formal, informal and group interviews.• Analysis of official and private archives in Australia, Indonesia, the Netherlands and the UK.• Participant observation using anthropological fieldwork techniques.• Geographical analysis using transects, basemapping and overhead imagery.• Demographic analysis using historical data, cartographic records and surveys.Research was conducted in Australia, Indonesia (Jakarta and Bandung), the Netherlands (The Hague and Amsterdam) and the United Kingdom (London, Winchester, Salisbury and Warminster). Fieldwork was conducted over three periods in West Java (1994, 1995 and 1996) and one period in East Timor (1999-2000).General Results Obtained.The two principal case studies were the Darul Islam insurgency in West Java 1948-62 and the campaign in East Timor since 1974.The fieldwork data showed that low-intensity warfare in Indonesia between 1945 and 1999 did indeed demonstrate the political power-diffusion effect posited by the author. This effect was triggered by the outbreak of guerrilla warfare, which itself flowed from crises generated by processes of modernisation and change within Indonesian society from traditional hierarchies to modern forms of social organisation. These crises were also affected by events at the systemic and regional levels of analysis – the invasion of the Netherlands East Indies by Japan, the Cold War, the Asian financial crisis and increasing economic and media globalisation. They resulted in a breakdown or…

Subjects/Keywords: Indonesia; Low-intensity conflicts (Military science); Civil-military relations; Guerrilla warfare; Insurgency; counter-insurgency; West Java; East Timor; political power; politics; government; Darul Islam

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kilcullen, D. J. (2000). The political consequences of military operations in Indonesia 1945-99 : a fieldwork analysis of the political power-diffusion effects of guerilla conflict. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/38709 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:3240/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kilcullen, David J. “The political consequences of military operations in Indonesia 1945-99 : a fieldwork analysis of the political power-diffusion effects of guerilla conflict.” 2000. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/38709 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:3240/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kilcullen, David J. “The political consequences of military operations in Indonesia 1945-99 : a fieldwork analysis of the political power-diffusion effects of guerilla conflict.” 2000. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kilcullen DJ. The political consequences of military operations in Indonesia 1945-99 : a fieldwork analysis of the political power-diffusion effects of guerilla conflict. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2000. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/38709 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:3240/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Kilcullen DJ. The political consequences of military operations in Indonesia 1945-99 : a fieldwork analysis of the political power-diffusion effects of guerilla conflict. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2000. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/38709 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:3240/SOURCE01?view=true

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