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You searched for subject:(Cyclic dispersion). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Zhang, Renlin. Soot Particle Sampling and Morphology Analysis in an Optically Accessible Diesel Engine.

Degree: Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, 2014, University of New South Wales

A significant reduction of soot emissions from diesel engines cannot be achieved without an improved understanding of the soot processes inside the engine cylinder. While previous studies have primarily focused on exhaust soot particles, how these soot particles are formed in the first place is virtually unknown. To bridge this gap, this thesis presents a new experimental approach for collecting soot particles inside the cylinder of a single-cylinder light-duty diesel engine using a thermophoretic sampling technique. Soot samples are analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and subsequent image post-processing to obtain key parameters such as size distributions and fractal dimensions of soot particles. Results of this thesis demonstrate the successful collection of in-flame soot particles for the first time in a working diesel engine. The uncertainty analysis showed that the cyclic dispersions of engine combustion do not inflict significant impacts on particle size distribution. Parametrical studies with various injection timing and pressure revealed that the late injection timing or high injection pressure reduces the number counts, projection area, aggregate size and fractal dimension of in-flame soot particles. Increasing injection pressure also resulted in reduced primary particle size. Soot samplings were also conducted for various combustion stages by changing the sampling location with respect to the diesel flame. Reduced soot projection area and aggregate size are found for post-wall-impingement soot particles suggesting the effect of flame-wall interaction. Furthermore, late-cycle and exhaust soot particles show reduced number counts, projection area, and primary particle size. These trends suggest that small particles are easily oxidized during the combustion while large aggregates with compact structures would more likely survive the oxidation. Moreover, the wall-deposited and in-flame soot particles were compared. The results show much smaller number counts, projection area and more compacted structures for the wall-deposited soot particles. The findings of this study are expected to build a new science base needed by industry to develop improved combustion strategies that achieve further reduction in soot emissions. The data provided by this work would also help build new soot models applicable to practical diesel engine conditions. Advisors/Committee Members: Kook, Sanghoon, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW, Hawkes, Evatt, Photovoltaics & Renewable Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Soot emissions; Particles; Diesel engines; Thermophoretic sampling technique; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM); Engine cylinder; Cyclic dispersion; Engine combustion

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, R. (2014). Soot Particle Sampling and Morphology Analysis in an Optically Accessible Diesel Engine. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54002 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12710/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Renlin. “Soot Particle Sampling and Morphology Analysis in an Optically Accessible Diesel Engine.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54002 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12710/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Renlin. “Soot Particle Sampling and Morphology Analysis in an Optically Accessible Diesel Engine.” 2014. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhang R. Soot Particle Sampling and Morphology Analysis in an Optically Accessible Diesel Engine. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54002 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12710/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang R. Soot Particle Sampling and Morphology Analysis in an Optically Accessible Diesel Engine. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54002 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12710/SOURCE02?view=true


University of Victoria

2. Esmaeili, Ali. Linear network codes on cyclic and acyclic networks.

Degree: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2016, University of Victoria

Consider a network which consists of noiseless point to point channels. In this network, the source node wants to send messages to a specific set of sink nodes. If an intermediate node v has just one input channel then the received symbol by that node can be replicated and sent to the outgoing channels from v. If v has at least two incoming channels then it has two options. It can either send the received symbols one-by-one, one symbol in each time unit, or v can transmit a combination of the received symbols. The former choice takes more time compared to the latter option, which is called network coding. In the literature, it has been shown that in a single source finite acyclic network the maximum throughput can be achieved by using linear network codes. Significant effort has been made to efficiently construct good network codes. In addition, a polynomial time algorithm for constructing a linear network code on a given network was introduced. Also an algorithm for constructing a linear multicast code on an acyclic network was introduced. Finally, a method for finding a representation matrix for the network matroid of a given network G was also introduced. This matrix can be used to construct a generic code. In this thesis we first provide a review of some known methods for constructing linear multicast, broadcast and dispersion codes for cyclic and acyclic networks. We then give a method for normalization of a non-normal code, and also give a new algorithm for constructing a linear multicast code on a cyclic network. The construction of generic network codes is also addressed. Advisors/Committee Members: Gulliver, T. Aaron (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: linear network codes; linear multicast code; linear broadcast code; linear dispersion code; generic network code; cyclic network; acyclic network; network matroid; normal code

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Esmaeili, A. (2016). Linear network codes on cyclic and acyclic networks. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7252

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Esmaeili, Ali. “Linear network codes on cyclic and acyclic networks.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7252.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Esmaeili, Ali. “Linear network codes on cyclic and acyclic networks.” 2016. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Esmaeili A. Linear network codes on cyclic and acyclic networks. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7252.

Council of Science Editors:

Esmaeili A. Linear network codes on cyclic and acyclic networks. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7252

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