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You searched for subject:(Crosstalk matrix). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Sreenivasappa, Harini Bytaraya. Mechanical Signaling Induced Cellular Remodeling Studied By Integrated Optical And Atomic Force Microscopy.

Degree: 2014, Texas A&M University

Vascular wall composition and mechanics are important for cardiovascular physiology and pathology. The reciprocal interaction between cells and their microenvironment influence cellular adaptation to external mechanical cues through the remodeling of cytoskeletal structures and cell?matrix adhesions to ensure normal cell function. We proposed to investigate the relationship between the cytoskeletal tension development and cell adhesion to the matrix in the context of cellular contraction and migration. Our studies aimed to understand how cells sense, respond, and adapt to external mechanical forces in order to induce vascular remodeling in cardiovascular disease. Integration of atomic force microscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence and spinning-disk confocal microscopy enabled acquisition of complementary structural and functional measurements on live vascular smooth muscle cells expressing key mutant proteins with important roles in defining contractile and migratory cellular properties. Single ligand?receptor interaction measurements showed that RhoA and c-Src activation have different effects on cytoskeletal tension development, inducing two distinct force?stiffness functional regimes for ?5?1-integrin binding to fibronectin. In addition, c-Src was associated with regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation, suggesting a c-Src-dependent modulation of RhoA pathway through activation of downstream effectors. These data were in good agreement with fluorescence measurements that showed a modest effect of Src activation on stress fibers formation, in contrast with RhoA activation that had a significant effect. On the other hand, ?-actin null cells exhibited increased FAK activation and cell stiffness. Our results suggest that the absence of ?-actin may induce compensatory effects of up-regulation of other contractile proteins and activation of focal adhesion proteins in order to encourage cell migration and proliferation. In addition, our findings suggest that Nck regulates directional cell migration in part through modulation of cytoskeletal tension and cell-matrix adhesion strength, which has an important role in coordination of cytoskeletal mechanics through a mechanism that also involves the RhoA pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that the contractile state of the cell is determined by cytoskeletal tension, which is controlled by a regulatory network involving RhoA and activation state of actomyosin apparatus. In turn, the cytoskeletal tension state modulates integrin ?5?1?fibronectin adhesion force. The results of this study suggest a central role for cytoskeletal tension in modulating cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion to the matrix. Advisors/Committee Members: Trache, Andreea (advisor), Hwang, Wonmuk (committee member), Yeh, Alvin (committee member), Burghardt , Robert (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mechanotransduction; Adhesion force spectroscopy; cytoskeletal tension; RhoA pathway; RhoA - Src crosstalk; cell?matrix adhesions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sreenivasappa, H. B. (2014). Mechanical Signaling Induced Cellular Remodeling Studied By Integrated Optical And Atomic Force Microscopy. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154022

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sreenivasappa, Harini Bytaraya. “Mechanical Signaling Induced Cellular Remodeling Studied By Integrated Optical And Atomic Force Microscopy.” 2014. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154022.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sreenivasappa, Harini Bytaraya. “Mechanical Signaling Induced Cellular Remodeling Studied By Integrated Optical And Atomic Force Microscopy.” 2014. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Sreenivasappa HB. Mechanical Signaling Induced Cellular Remodeling Studied By Integrated Optical And Atomic Force Microscopy. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154022.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sreenivasappa HB. Mechanical Signaling Induced Cellular Remodeling Studied By Integrated Optical And Atomic Force Microscopy. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/154022

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Western Ontario

2. Roumeliotis, Michael B. Real-time Three-dimensional Photoacoustic Imaging.

Degree: 2011, University of Western Ontario

Photoacoustic imaging is a modality that combines the benefits of two prominent imaging techniques; the strong contrast inherent to optical imaging techniques with the enhanced penetration depth and resolution of ultrasound imaging. PA waves are generated by illuminating a light-absorbing object with a short laser pulse. The deposited energy causes a pressure change in the object and, consequently, an outwardly propagating acoustic wave. Images are produced by using characteristic optical information contained within the waves. We have developed a 3D PA imaging system by using a staring, sparse array approach to produce real-time PA images. The technique employs the use of a limited number of transducers and by solving a linear system model, 3D PA images are rendered. In this thesis, the development of an omni-directional PA source is introduced as a method to characterize the shift-variant system response. From this foundation, a technique is presented to generate an experimental estimate of the imaging operator for a PA system. This allows further characterization of the object space by two techniques; the crosstalk matrix and singular value decomposition. Finally, the results of the singular value decomposition analysis coupled with the linear system model approach to image reconstruction, 3D PA images are produced at a frame rate of 0.7 Hz. This approach to 3D PA imaging has provided the foundation for 3D PA images to be produced at frame rates limited only by the laser repetition rate, as straightforward system improvements could see the imaging process reduced to tens of milliseconds.

Subjects/Keywords: Photoacoustic imaging; 3D imaging; Real-time imaging; Singular value decomposition; Crosstalk matrix; Medical Biophysics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Roumeliotis, M. B. (2011). Real-time Three-dimensional Photoacoustic Imaging. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/227

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Roumeliotis, Michael B. “Real-time Three-dimensional Photoacoustic Imaging.” 2011. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed July 03, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/227.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Roumeliotis, Michael B. “Real-time Three-dimensional Photoacoustic Imaging.” 2011. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Roumeliotis MB. Real-time Three-dimensional Photoacoustic Imaging. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/227.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Roumeliotis MB. Real-time Three-dimensional Photoacoustic Imaging. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2011. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/227

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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