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You searched for subject:(Continuing education Scotland). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Stirling

1. May, T. H. Teacher decision making in further education.

Degree: PhD, 2000, University of Stirling

Teachers' decision making is a crucial element in the quality of delivery of teaching and learning and, therefore, of educational outcomes in the form of student performance. There is, however, a dearth of relevant studies in this area, especially in the F. E. sector. This study sets out to investigate the practice of teachers' decision making in the substantive context of the Further Education sector in Scotland. The investigation adopted two main approaches: firstly, an interpretive approach,in which qualitative and quantitative methods were combined to collect and analyse data by the protocols of individual interviews, case studies and questionnaires: secondly, a developmental approach involved the application throughout of constant comparative analysis,in the tradition of "grounded theory". The population of the study, the source of both qualitative and quantitative data, was made up of 145 practitioner- subjects, drawn from a range of subject specialisms and approximately evenly split in terms of gender. The qualitative data,when statistically analysed permitted comparisons of the responses of the subjects to be made in terms of major subject specialisms in their teaching,and also in terms of gender. The major conceptual and theoretical outcome is a descriptive model of the practice of teachers' decision making, developed on the basis of subsidiary outcomes: a new, operational definition of decision. an innovative typology of decisions; an original way of categorising decisions by their content or substance. The developed versions of these outcomes constitute the major findings of the research. Recommendations include: potential applications of the outcomes of the study; possible research routes to further development of the conceptual findings presented. The boundaries and limitations of the study are also described and discussed.

Subjects/Keywords: Teachers Scotland Decision making; Continuing education Scotland; Teacher-student relationships

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

May, T. H. (2000). Teacher decision making in further education. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Stirling. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12133

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

May, T H. “Teacher decision making in further education.” 2000. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Stirling. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12133.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

May, T H. “Teacher decision making in further education.” 2000. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

May TH. Teacher decision making in further education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2000. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12133.

Council of Science Editors:

May TH. Teacher decision making in further education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2000. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/12133


University of Stirling

2. Lowe, Janet. Integrating learning with life: a study of higher education students in a further education college: 2000-2003.

Degree: DE, School of Education, 2005, University of Stirling

In Scotland, further education colleges provide 28% of all higher education; this includes over half of part-time undergraduate higher education. This provision has contributed to wider participation in higher education in Scotland by “non traditional” students and to progress towards a mass system of higher education within a learning society. This thesis is a case study of higher education students in a Scottish further education college. It explores the nature of the students’ experience and its relevance to institutional management and higher education policy. Evidence is drawn from the college’s records, from focus groups and from a questionnaire survey of whole year groups (full-time and part-time students) over three successive years. The theoretical focus is upon a new definition of lifelong learning as learning integrated with life, drawn from literature on motive, motivation, participation and retention. The research explores the students’ experiences of combining study with work and family life. The student experience is found to be heterogeneous, complex and distinct from the stereotype of a young full-time university student. Vocational motives predominate and there is evidence of a significant investment of meaning, expectation and purpose in the experience of higher education. The students’ ability to balance and integrate learning with life is a determining factor in the achievement of sustained participation. The quality of support networks both in college and in the students’ work and family lives are found to be more significant than personal or demographic characteristics. The case study contributes to current thinking about the professional role of college senior managers in creating a student-centred institutional culture that responds to the complexity of the students’ experience. A case is made for a review of the current inequity of financial support for full-time and part-time higher education students and of the marginal status of colleges in the development of higher education policy.

Subjects/Keywords: further education college; higher education; integration of learning with life; participation; part-time higher education; lifelong learning policy; college management; retention; student experience; lifelong learning; motivation; HNC/HND; study and work and family life; Lifelong learning Scotland; Students, Part-time Scotland; Education, Higher Management Scotland; Continuing education Scotland; Universities and colleges Scotland

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lowe, J. (2005). Integrating learning with life: a study of higher education students in a further education college: 2000-2003. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Stirling. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1893/66

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lowe, Janet. “Integrating learning with life: a study of higher education students in a further education college: 2000-2003.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Stirling. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1893/66.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lowe, Janet. “Integrating learning with life: a study of higher education students in a further education college: 2000-2003.” 2005. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lowe J. Integrating learning with life: a study of higher education students in a further education college: 2000-2003. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/66.

Council of Science Editors:

Lowe J. Integrating learning with life: a study of higher education students in a further education college: 2000-2003. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/66

.