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You searched for subject:(Contextual Survey). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Louisiana State University

1. Berthelot, Emily R. Person or place? A contextual event-history analysis of homicide victimization risk.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2010, Louisiana State University

This study is a contextual event history analysis of the risk of homicide victimization in the United States from 1986 to 2002. Although the majority of research on homicide deals with how community factors influence homicide rates, a much less studied aspect of homicide victimization deals with the influence of individual factors on homicide victimization risk. This study examines the influence of contextual-level measures of social disorganization on the risk of homicide victimization and focuses specifically on how the effects of these measures change once individual-level characteristics are considered in the models. Grounded in social disorganization theory, this study includes contextual-level predictors of disadvantage, including measures representative of resource deprivation, urbanness, and housing instability. Lifestyle theory suggests that a person’s individual attributes may compel that person to behave in certain ways that may work to either increase or decrease their risk of being the victim of a crime, and may also reduce or diminish the effects of the social structure on their risk of victimization. This study, using National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data matched with National Death Index (NDI) data, examines the intersection of these ideas and seeks to explain how community context influences one’s chance of being a homicide victim and especially on how individual attributes alter the relationship between community context and homicide victimization. The findings of this research indicate that individuals living in areas with high concentrations of disadvantage, such as resource deprivation, urbanization, and housing instability experience increased risk of being the victim of a homicide. However, a person’s individual traits, particularly age, race, and sex do, in fact, greatly reduce the criminogenic consequences of both resource deprivation and housing instability on their risk of being killed by a homicide. However, regardless of a person’s individual attributes, living in an area with high levels of urbanization have three times greater odds of being killed by a homicide, compared to person’s living in MSAs with less urbanization. In this study, urbanization is measured using an index obtained from a principal components analysis that contains measures of population size, population density, and two measures of racial/ethnic heterogeneity.

Subjects/Keywords: individual-level; National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); contextual-level; multi-level; lifestyle theory; homicide; social disorganization theory

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APA (6th Edition):

Berthelot, E. R. (2010). Person or place? A contextual event-history analysis of homicide victimization risk. (Doctoral Dissertation). Louisiana State University. Retrieved from etd-08202010-153424 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/247

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berthelot, Emily R. “Person or place? A contextual event-history analysis of homicide victimization risk.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Louisiana State University. Accessed August 25, 2019. etd-08202010-153424 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/247.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berthelot, Emily R. “Person or place? A contextual event-history analysis of homicide victimization risk.” 2010. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Berthelot ER. Person or place? A contextual event-history analysis of homicide victimization risk. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: etd-08202010-153424 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/247.

Council of Science Editors:

Berthelot ER. Person or place? A contextual event-history analysis of homicide victimization risk. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2010. Available from: etd-08202010-153424 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/247

2. Salihovic, Ademir. Varför har vi förtroende för Europa Unionen? : Korruptionens påverkan på förtroendet för nationella institutioner och Europa Unionen.

Degree: Political Science, 2016, Linnaeus University

Subjects/Keywords: Corruption; European Union (EU); trust; contextual analysis; European Social Survey; Corruption Perception Index (CPI); Korruption; Europa Unionen (EU); förtroende; kontextuell analys

…från enkätundersökningen International Social Survey Program (ISSP)… …över 28 000 individer deltagit. European Social Survey mäter attityden, beteendet och… …på är hämtad från European Social Survey (ESS), Transparency Internationals… …Transparency Internationals och European Social Survey data används för att testa kopplingen (1… …korruptionsnivåera i de gemensamma länder som både European Social Survey och Transparency International… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Salihovic, A. (2016). Varför har vi förtroende för Europa Unionen? : Korruptionens påverkan på förtroendet för nationella institutioner och Europa Unionen. (Thesis). Linnaeus University. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54202

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Salihovic, Ademir. “Varför har vi förtroende för Europa Unionen? : Korruptionens påverkan på förtroendet för nationella institutioner och Europa Unionen.” 2016. Thesis, Linnaeus University. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54202.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Salihovic, Ademir. “Varför har vi förtroende för Europa Unionen? : Korruptionens påverkan på förtroendet för nationella institutioner och Europa Unionen.” 2016. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Salihovic A. Varför har vi förtroende för Europa Unionen? : Korruptionens påverkan på förtroendet för nationella institutioner och Europa Unionen. [Internet] [Thesis]. Linnaeus University; 2016. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54202.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Salihovic A. Varför har vi förtroende för Europa Unionen? : Korruptionens påverkan på förtroendet för nationella institutioner och Europa Unionen. [Thesis]. Linnaeus University; 2016. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54202

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Knowles, Dylan. The Design and Use of a Smartphone Data Collection Tool and Accompanying Configuration Language.

Degree: 2014, University of Saskatchewan

Understanding human behaviour is key to understanding the spread of epidemics, habit dispersion, and the efficacy of health interventions. Investigation into the patterns of and drivers for human behaviour has often been facilitated by paper tools such as surveys, journals, and diaries. These tools have drawbacks in that they can be forgotten, go unfilled, and depend on often unreliable human memories. Researcher-driven data collection mechanisms, such as interviews and direct observation, alleviate some of these problems while introducing others, such as bias and observer effects. In response to this, technological means such as special-purpose data collection hardware, wireless sensor networks, and apps for smart devices have been built to collect behavioural data. These technologies further reduce the problems experienced by more traditional behavioural research tools, but often experience problems of reliability, generality, extensibility, and ease of configuration. This document details the construction of a smartphone-based app designed to collect data on human behaviour such that the difficulties of traditional tools are alleviated while still addressing the problems faced by modern supplemental technology. I describe the app's main data collection engine and its construction, architecture, reliability, generality, and extensibility, as well as the programming language developed to configure it and its feature set. To demonstrate the utility of the tool and its configuration language, I describe how they have been used to collect data in the field. Specifically, eleven case studies are presented in which the tool's architecture, flexibility, generality, extensibility, modularity, and ease of configuration have been exploited to facilitate a variety of behavioural monitoring endeavours. I further explain how the engine performs data collection, the major abstractions it employs, how its design and the development techniques used ensure ongoing reliability, and how the engine and its configuration language could be extended in the future to facilitate a greater range of experiments that require behavioural data to be collected. Finally, features and modules of the engine's encompassing system, iEpi, are presented that have not otherwise been documented to give the reader an understanding of where the work fits into the larger data collection and processing endeavour that spawned it. Advisors/Committee Members: Osgood, Nathaniel D., Stanley, Kevin G., Makaroff, Dwight, Dutchyn, Chris, Engler-Stringer, Rachel.

Subjects/Keywords: Human Behaviour; Data Collection; Architecture; Smartphone; Android; Pipeline; Programming Language; Wireless Sensor Network; Contextual Survey; English-like Language; Ecological Momentary Assessment; Participant Tracking; Spatio-temporal Behaviour

…participants. Survey answer quality and completion rates can also be limited by the patience, memory… …survey is simply forgotten, a survey will go unanswered. Human memory and perception is often… …external, specialized tools such as survey systems. App infrastructure also provides mechanisms… …required, can provide sensed context such as location to survey and diarying applications, and… …intervals, which reduces the likelihood that diary and survey entries will be lost. Smartphones… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knowles, D. (2014). The Design and Use of a Smartphone Data Collection Tool and Accompanying Configuration Language. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-12-1851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knowles, Dylan. “The Design and Use of a Smartphone Data Collection Tool and Accompanying Configuration Language.” 2014. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-12-1851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knowles, Dylan. “The Design and Use of a Smartphone Data Collection Tool and Accompanying Configuration Language.” 2014. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Knowles D. The Design and Use of a Smartphone Data Collection Tool and Accompanying Configuration Language. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-12-1851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Knowles D. The Design and Use of a Smartphone Data Collection Tool and Accompanying Configuration Language. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2014-12-1851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.