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You searched for subject:(Conspiracism). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Giry, Julien. Le conspirationnisme dans la culture politique et populaire aux Etats-Unis : une approche sociopolitique des théories du complot : Conspiracism in American politics and popular culture : a sociopolitical approach of conspiracy theories.

Degree: Docteur es, Science Politique, 2014, Rennes 1

Du 11 septembre aux extraterrestres, des camps de concentration américains à l'assassinat de Kennedy, cette thèse a pour objectif d'éclairer sous un angle sociopolitique les fondements, les mécanismes et les enjeux de la pensée conspirationniste aux États-Unis depuis la révolution jusqu'à nos jours. S'il ne s'agit pas de dresser un catalogue exhaustif de toutes les théories du complot en vogue, le but demeure de démontrer que le conspirationnisme est un véritable fait social aux États-Unis, un élément de culture politique et populaire. Cette thèse se propose alors d'étudier les rouages et les origines du conspirationnisme sous trois aspects différents et complémentaires qui forment un triangle. D'abord, sous l'angle factuel, c'est-à-dire en étudiant les thèses du complot relatives à un événement extraordinaire (9/11, assassinat de JFK, etc.). Ensuite, sous l'angle des acteurs du conspirationnisme : les leaders conspirationnistes (LaRouche, Icke, etc.), les citoyens enquêteurs et les boucs-émissaires (communistes, juifs, illuminatis, etc.). Enfin, sous l'angle culturel en mettant en perspective le conspirationnisme avec la culture américaine : l'anti-étatisme, la présence de mafias ou encore le cinéma de masse.

From 9/11 to UFOs, from American concentration camps to the Kennedy's assassination, this dissertation aims to enlighten, through a sociopolitical analysis, the grounds, the mechanics and the goals of the conspiratorial thought in the United States since the Revolution. Even Though it is no question to draw an exhaustive catalog of each and every conspiracy theory, I would stress that conspiracism is part of the American political and popular culture. Then, this dissertation studies the origins and the developments of conspiracism through three complementary focuses. First, a factual approach which dwells on specific conspiracy theories such as the 9/11 attacks or the assassination of Kennedy. Secondly, I will come on the actors of conspiracism : the conspiracist leaders (LaRouche, Icke) the citizens sleuths and the scapegoats (Communists, Jews, Illuminatis). Finally, under a cultural angle, I will outlook conspiracism and the American culture of anti-statism, the presence of mafias or the role of mass-medias.

Advisors/Committee Members: Lambert, Frédéric (thesis director).

Subjects/Keywords: Conspirationnisme; Théories du complot; Etats-Unis; Culture politique; Culture populaire; Radicalisme politique; Droites extrêmes; Conspiracism; Conspiracy Theories; United States; Political Culture; Popular Culture; Political Radicalism; Far Rights

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Giry, J. (2014). Le conspirationnisme dans la culture politique et populaire aux Etats-Unis : une approche sociopolitique des théories du complot : Conspiracism in American politics and popular culture : a sociopolitical approach of conspiracy theories. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rennes 1. Retrieved from http://www.theses.fr/2014REN1G006

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Giry, Julien. “Le conspirationnisme dans la culture politique et populaire aux Etats-Unis : une approche sociopolitique des théories du complot : Conspiracism in American politics and popular culture : a sociopolitical approach of conspiracy theories.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Rennes 1. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://www.theses.fr/2014REN1G006.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Giry, Julien. “Le conspirationnisme dans la culture politique et populaire aux Etats-Unis : une approche sociopolitique des théories du complot : Conspiracism in American politics and popular culture : a sociopolitical approach of conspiracy theories.” 2014. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Giry J. Le conspirationnisme dans la culture politique et populaire aux Etats-Unis : une approche sociopolitique des théories du complot : Conspiracism in American politics and popular culture : a sociopolitical approach of conspiracy theories. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rennes 1; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2014REN1G006.

Council of Science Editors:

Giry J. Le conspirationnisme dans la culture politique et populaire aux Etats-Unis : une approche sociopolitique des théories du complot : Conspiracism in American politics and popular culture : a sociopolitical approach of conspiracy theories. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rennes 1; 2014. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2014REN1G006


Kent State University

2. Abu Shal, Abdulrahman Faisal. Conspiracy Theory and Conspiracism in Postwar Literature.

Degree: PhD, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English, 2020, Kent State University

Conspiracy theory is a challenging term. It often describes a form of the irrational belief that conspiracies with nefarious goals exist. However, conspiracy theory can be an epistemological approach to investigate the possibility that a conspiracy exists. I argue that it must be distinguished from "conspiracism," a term that describes a worldview the explains everything as a conspiracy. This dissertation explores how postwar novels, by Thomas Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, and Umberto Eco, represent the political and cultural challenges that conspiracy theory and conspiracism present. This dissertation proposes that conspiracy theories can be rational. They are, in general, not prima facie irrational simply because they are conspiracy theories, and in some cases, they are supported by inaccurate evidence. I argue that conspiracy theory must not be conflated with conspiracism, which is the constant belief that there are always conspiracies behind what occurs in reality. Conspiracism insists that a conspiracy exists despite the evidence that may prove otherwise. What distinguishes the rational investigation of conspiracies from the irrational and exaggerated belief in conspiracy theories is that the former maintains trust in the factual evidence that proves the conspiracy exists. In contrast, the latter refuses any evidence that proves otherwise. Conspiracy theory and conspiracism manifest differently in these novels. Firstly, Pynchon's novels highlight the use of conspiracy theory as a rational approach to investigate conspiracies. The protagonists of his novels, Oedipa Maas in The Crying of Lot 49 and Tyrone Slothrop in Gravity's Rainbow, face several epistemological challenges as they attempt to uncover the truth about the possible conspiracies which target them. Secondly, Reed's novel shows how conspiracism impedes the investigation of ac actual conspiracy that occurs within the novel. Papa LaBas, the protagonist, tries to justify his claim that a conspiracy exists but fails to justify it by rational evidence. Finally, Eco's Foucault's Pendulum showcases the willingness of the conspiracist characters to persist in their investigation of a conspiracy that does not exist. His protagonists present the counterarguments, showing the implausibility of the conspiracist claim that a secret plan exists. The novels discussed are instrumental in exploring the issues of conspiracy theory and conspiracism, mainly since they reflect the cultural issues resulting from the Cold War period in which they were published. Advisors/Committee Members: Clewell, Tammy (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: African American Studies; African Americans; American Studies; American Literature; Black Studies; Literature; European Studies; Conspiracy Theory; Conspiracism; Postwar Literature; Thomas Pynchon; Ishmael Reed; Umberto Eco; The Crying of Lot 49; Gravitys Rainbow; Mumbo Jumbo; Foucaults Pendulum; American Literature; Italian Literature; Cultural Studies; Postmodernism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abu Shal, A. F. (2020). Conspiracy Theory and Conspiracism in Postwar Literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1594201143469153

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abu Shal, Abdulrahman Faisal. “Conspiracy Theory and Conspiracism in Postwar Literature.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1594201143469153.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abu Shal, Abdulrahman Faisal. “Conspiracy Theory and Conspiracism in Postwar Literature.” 2020. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Abu Shal AF. Conspiracy Theory and Conspiracism in Postwar Literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1594201143469153.

Council of Science Editors:

Abu Shal AF. Conspiracy Theory and Conspiracism in Postwar Literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2020. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1594201143469153

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