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University of Washington

1. Kirking, Cornelia Anne. Teaching College Writing in a High School Setting: The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Teacher Learning and Practice.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Washington

In today’s educational climate, in which preparing all K-12 students to succeed in college and career is paramount, a prominent concern is to ensure that students leave high school with “college level” writing skills (Acker & Halasek, 2008; Crank, 2012; Moss & Bordelon, 2010). Notably, these discussions revolve around ensuring students are ready to cross the threshold between high school and college writing, and around giving them the tools they need to bridge the gap. With few avenues for conversation or collaboration with university faculty, high school teachers aiming to prepare students for college writing sometimes feel as though they are “in the dark” (Davies, 2006). This perennial separation means that secondary teachers, who are charged with preparing their students for college with little current knowledge about expectations in college courses, end up reifying “divides” and “gaps” separating high school and college. My study considered Concurrent Enrollment (CE) composition programs as one model for attempting to facilitate communication and collaboration between high school and college stakeholders. To investigate the potential CE programs have to serve as learning opportunities for CE teachers, this dissertation was guided by the question: “How do teachers’ Discourses, material and relational resources, and identities interact to mediate their learning in practice?” Conceptually, this paper begins with King Beach’s “consequential transitions” framework (1999, 2003). Beach’s developmental view of knowledge propagation provides a framework for understanding learning as “the construction of new knowledge, ways of knowing, and new positionings of oneself in the world” (Beach, 2003, p. 42). Consequential transitions help not only to conceptualize the “trajectory” of an individual’s development, but they also help to situate an individual’s development within the context of settings, practices, and identities. CE teachers’ work is impacted by multiple settings (classroom/school/district/community and the university setting), making attending to settings critical for this research. Thus, as a complement to Beach’s framework, this research takes up the situative perspective of learning (Gee, 2008; Greeno, 2005; Putnam & Borko, 2000; Sawyer & Greeno, 2009). The situative perspective views learning as emerging from “interactions between people and resources in the setting” (Sawyer & Greeno, 2009, p. 348). Within settings, focal teachers engaged in the practices of planning and teaching the CE course and, in so doing, they were becoming socialized into a new secondary Discourse for writing instruction. In this process, their established Discourses for teaching and teaching writing (rooted in their prior work and existing settings) interacted with their attempts to become fluent in the Discourse(s) of writing pedagogy of the CHS course (Gee, 2008; 2015). Furthermore, to support an analysis of teacher learning with consequential transitions as a frame, teacher identity was a significant consideration because it… Advisors/Committee Members: Hebard, Heather (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Concurrent enrollment; Consequential Transitions; Curriculum & Instruction; English Language Arts; Practice Linked Identities; Teacher Learning; Teacher education; Pedagogy; Language arts; education - seattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kirking, C. A. (2016). Teaching College Writing in a High School Setting: The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Teacher Learning and Practice. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/36571

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kirking, Cornelia Anne. “Teaching College Writing in a High School Setting: The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Teacher Learning and Practice.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed November 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/36571.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kirking, Cornelia Anne. “Teaching College Writing in a High School Setting: The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Teacher Learning and Practice.” 2016. Web. 13 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Kirking CA. Teaching College Writing in a High School Setting: The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Teacher Learning and Practice. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/36571.

Council of Science Editors:

Kirking CA. Teaching College Writing in a High School Setting: The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Teacher Learning and Practice. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/36571

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