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You searched for subject:(Connemara). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Limerick

1. Ó Bolguidhir, Piaras. Mar atá: nádúr mar chomhthéacs.

Degree: Architecture, University of Limerick, 2012, University of Limerick

non-peer-reviewed

The reality of climate change, today, has conferred an unprecedented importance upon nature, weather and the atmosphere. Climate change is very real, perhaps not as apocalyptic as some have predicted, but nonetheless major changes are in progress. Nature has acquired a new fragility; hence architecture demands a new sensitivity. Our understanding of context is changing to include and participate in nature. How might architecture meet this existing situation? The argument for context, for redefining the architectural object as a constituent of a milieu, means rethinking the building’s engagement with its material and spatial surroundings, whether built or unbuilt. Buildings are always built somewhere. In the best cases, an architectural intervention has a critical relationship with its situation, and its construction is somehow communicative with the existing physical and social context. The thesis project is based in Connemara, in the west of Ireland. Iorras Aithneach (stormy peninsula), specifically the coastline from Cill Chiaráin (Kilkerrin/ St. Ciarán’s church) in the East to Carna (Carna/cairns or heaps) in the West, becomes the focus of the project. The coastline is broken up by sea inlets and many offshore islands. The sheer complexity, the high fractal dimensionality, of the coastline provides habitat for huge tonnages of seaweed to occur naturally. Past generations of Connemara people used to gather seaweed to fertilize their potato-crops, and to burn for kelp, which was the principal source of income for almost two-and-a-half centuries from the 1700s on. Each household of the coastal villages had seaweed rights on a certain stretch of shore, and harvested several tons of seaweed off it every year. Every little cranny of the shore was intimately known, by touch, to the families who worked it. The existing seaweed infrastructure, Arramara Teoranta (located at Céibh Cill Chiaráin) and NUI Galway Ryan Institute’s Marine Research Laboratory (located at Céibh an Chrompáin, Carna), suggests an opportunity to test the potential of seaweed farming, which might become an important local industry. What architectural principles could find value in such a context? Beyond the obvious impact of legibility, a level of simplicity is crucial, combined with a new, in depth, sensitivity in architecture. Perhaps nothing may truly be regarded as simple in itself, but, rather, must achieve simplicity as a perfectly realised part of a whole. The construction strives for a more subliminal, even primitive communication. Most immediately evident may be a concern for the grounding of the construction in its circumstance. The changeability and irregularity of the existing topography is registered and respected. The impact on the ground is minimal. The project provides an opportunity to demonstrate how architecture might meet nature’s fragility. A desire to ‘register’ the project in its context – to make spaces that in some way express the environment and respond to it – becomes…

Advisors/Committee Members: Bucholz, Merritt, Carroll, Peter, Ryan, Anna.

Subjects/Keywords: architecture; climate change; Connemara

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ó Bolguidhir, P. (2012). Mar atá: nádúr mar chomhthéacs. (Thesis). University of Limerick. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10344/2510

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ó Bolguidhir, Piaras. “Mar atá: nádúr mar chomhthéacs.” 2012. Thesis, University of Limerick. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10344/2510.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ó Bolguidhir, Piaras. “Mar atá: nádúr mar chomhthéacs.” 2012. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Ó Bolguidhir P. Mar atá: nádúr mar chomhthéacs. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Limerick; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10344/2510.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ó Bolguidhir P. Mar atá: nádúr mar chomhthéacs. [Thesis]. University of Limerick; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10344/2510

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University College Cork

2. McCarthy, William J. An evaluation of orogenic kinematic evolution utilizing crystalline and magnetic anisotropy in granitoids.

Degree: 2013, University College Cork

The Silurian-Devonian Galway Granite Complex (GGC ~425-380Ma) is defined here as a suite of granitoid plutons that comprise the Main Galway Granite Batholith and the Earlier Plutons. The Main Batholith is a composite of the Carna Pluton in the west and the Kilkieran Pluton in the east and extends from Galway City ~130km to the west. The Earlier Plutons are spatially, temporally and structurally distinct, situated northwest of the Main Batholith and include the Roundstone, Omey, Inis and Letterfrack Plutons. The majority of isotopic and structural data currently available pertain to the Kilkieran Pluton, several tectonic models have already been devised for this part of the complex. These relate emplacement of the Kilkieran Pluton to extension across a large east-west Caledonian lineament, i.e. the Skird Rocks Fault, during late Caledonian transtension. No chronological data have been published that directly and accurately date the emplacement of the Carna Pluton or any of the Earlier Plutons. There is also a lack of data pertaining to the internal structure of these intrusions. Accordingly, no previous study has established the mechanisms of emplacement for the Earlier Plutons and only limited work is available for the Carna Pluton. As a consequense of this, constituents of the GGC have not previously been placed in a context relative to each other or to regional scale Silurio-Devonian kinematics. The current work focuses on the Omey, Roundstone and Carna Plutons. Here, results of detailed field and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibiliy (AMS) fabric studies are presented. This work is complemented by geological mapping that focuses on fault dynamics and contact relationships. Interpretation of AMS data is aided by rock magnetic experiment data and petrographic microstructural evaluations of representative samples. A new geological map of the the Omey Pluton demonstrates that this intrusion has a defined roof and base which are gently inclined parallel to the fold hinge of the Connemara Antiform. AMS and petrographic data show the intrusion is cross cut by NNW-SSE shear zones that extend into the country rock. These pre-date and were active during magma emplacement. It is proposed that the Omey pluton was emplaced as a discordant phacolith. Pre-existing subvertical D5 faults in the host rock were reactived during emplacement, due to regional sinistral transpression, and served as centralised ascent conduits. A central portion of the Roundstone Pluton was mapped in detail for the first time. Two facies are identified, G1 forms the majority of the pluton and coeval G2 sheets cross cut G1 at the core of the pluton. NNW-SSE D5 faults mapped in the country rock extend across the pluton. These share a geometrical relationship with the distribution of submagmatic strain in the pluton and parallel the majoity of mapped subvertical G2 dykes. These data indicate that magma ascent was controlled by NNW-SSE conduits that are inherently related to those identifed in the Omey Pluton. It is proposed that the Roundstone Pluton is a… Advisors/Committee Members: Reavy, John, Petronis, Michael, IRCSET.

Subjects/Keywords: Connemara geology; LAICPMS; AMS; GGC; Galway granite; Anisotropy of magnetic susceptability (AMS); Caledonian orogeny; Omey granite; Carna granite; Roundstone granite; Kilkieran pluton; Galway granite complex (GGC)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCarthy, W. J. (2013). An evaluation of orogenic kinematic evolution utilizing crystalline and magnetic anisotropy in granitoids. (Thesis). University College Cork. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1669

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCarthy, William J. “An evaluation of orogenic kinematic evolution utilizing crystalline and magnetic anisotropy in granitoids.” 2013. Thesis, University College Cork. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1669.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCarthy, William J. “An evaluation of orogenic kinematic evolution utilizing crystalline and magnetic anisotropy in granitoids.” 2013. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

McCarthy WJ. An evaluation of orogenic kinematic evolution utilizing crystalline and magnetic anisotropy in granitoids. [Internet] [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1669.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McCarthy WJ. An evaluation of orogenic kinematic evolution utilizing crystalline and magnetic anisotropy in granitoids. [Thesis]. University College Cork; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1669

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

3. Farrelly, Ann Dillon. “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh.

Degree: PhD, Theatre, 2004, The Ohio State University

This dissertation focuses on the work of the new Irish playwright, Martin McDonagh, and where he fits in the rich tradition of Irish drama. The specific focus is an exploration of each of McDonagh’s five produced plays on Ireland: The Beauty Queen of Leenane, A Skull in Connemara, The Lonesome West, The Cripple of Inishmaan, and The Lieutenant of Inishmore. By tracing through the history of Irish drama from the establishment of the Irish Literary Theatre at the turn of the century to Friel and on to the present, this dissertation demonstrates how McDonagh’s drama offers a new voice for Ireland. This dissertation focuses on a few key individuals and their “benchmark” plays which laid the groundwork for McDonagh: W. B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, and J. M. Synge, Sean O’Casey, Samuel Beckett, and Brian Friel. In addition, this dissertation examines the notion of Irish identity and what that has meant to the other Irish playwrights. McDonagh’s plays have developed a reputation for being dark and desperate comedies that shine a light on the wickedness of the human spirit. This dissertation takes issue with those misinterpretations and focuses on the empowering nature of McDonagh’s message. Within each play, McDonagh creates exaggerated worlds in which the people defy tradition and invent their own moral codes. These exaggerated communities exist to teach the audience—and, more specifically, the Irish people—that they are no longer required to let the traditional power structures control their lives. In the worlds created by McDonagh, the people truly are the masters of their fate and the captains of their soul. McDonagh’s plays explore what it means to be human through the centering of the following four binaries: faith and reason, autonomy and responsibility, humans and nature, and individual and community. While the Irish drama of the past has illustrated how the Irish people have always privileged one side of each binary, McDonagh’s characters have negotiated these binaries and found the peaceful center. Advisors/Committee Members: Reilly, Joy (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, Modern; Theater; Martin McDonagh; Irish; Ireland; Irish drama; Irish theatre; theatre; Beauty Queen of Leenane; Skull in Connemara; Lonesome West; Lieutenant of Inishmore; Cripple of Inishmaan; Banshees of Inisheer; Pillowman; Irishness; Irish Identity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farrelly, A. D. (2004). “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farrelly, Ann Dillon. ““It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farrelly, Ann Dillon. ““It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh.” 2004. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Farrelly AD. “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442.

Council of Science Editors:

Farrelly AD. “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2004. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442

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