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You searched for subject:(Connectionist modeling). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Leiden University

1. Haazebroek, P. On the dynamic interplay between perception and action - a connectionist perspective.

Degree: 2013, Leiden University

Increasing evidence suggests that perception and action planning do not represent separable stages of a unidirectional processing sequence, but rather emerging properties of highly interactive processes. To capture these characteristics of the human cognitive system, we have developed a connectionist model of the interaction between perception and action planning: HiTEC, based on the Theory of Event Coding (Hommel, M_sseler, Achschersleben & Prinz, 2001). The model is characterized by representations at multiple levels and by shared representations and processes. It complements available models of stimulus__response translation by providing a rationale for (1) how situation-specific meanings of motor actions emerge, (2) how and why some aspects of stimulus__response translation occur automatically and (3) how task demands modulate sensorimotor processing. The model is demonstrated to provide a unitary account and simulation of a number of key findings with multiple experimental paradigms on the interaction between perception and action such as the Simon effect, its inversion (Hommel, 1993), and action__effect learning. Advisors/Committee Members: Hommel, B., Murre, J., Nieuwenhuis, S., Wolters, G., Leiden University.

Subjects/Keywords: Top down modulation; Stimulus-response compatibility; Ideomotor; Connectionist modeling; Action; Perception

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haazebroek, P. (2013). On the dynamic interplay between perception and action - a connectionist perspective. (Doctoral Dissertation). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/22849

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haazebroek, P. “On the dynamic interplay between perception and action - a connectionist perspective.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Leiden University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/22849.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haazebroek, P. “On the dynamic interplay between perception and action - a connectionist perspective.” 2013. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Haazebroek P. On the dynamic interplay between perception and action - a connectionist perspective. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Leiden University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/22849.

Council of Science Editors:

Haazebroek P. On the dynamic interplay between perception and action - a connectionist perspective. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Leiden University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/22849


University of Rochester

2. Goddard, Nigel H. The Perception of Articulated Motion: Recognizing Moving Light Displays.

Degree: PhD, 2004, University of Rochester

Recognition of motion sequences is a crucial ability for biological and robot vision systems. We present an architecture for the higher-level processes involved in recognition of complex structured motion. The work is focused on modeling human recognition of Moving Light Displays. MLDs are image sequences that contain only motion information at a small number of locations. Despite the extreme paucity of information in these displays, humans can recognize MLDs generated from a variety of common human movements. This dissertation explores the high-level representations and computational processes required for the recognition task. The structures and algorithms are articulated in the language of structured connectionist models. The implemented network can discriminate three human gaits from data generated by several actors. Recognition of any motion involves indexing into stored models of movement. We present a representation for such models, called scenarios, based on coordinated sequences of discrete motion events. A method for indexing into this representation is described. We develop a parallel model of spatial and conceptual attention that is essential for disambiguating the spatially and temporally diffuse MLD data. The major computational problems addressed are: (1) representation of time-varying visual models; (2) integration of visual stimuli over time; (3) gestalt formation in and between spatially-localized feature maps and central movement representations; (4) contextual feedback to lower levels; and (5) the use of attention to focus processing on particular spatial locations and particular high-level representations. Several novel connectionist mechanisms are developed and used in the implementation. In particular, we present advances in connectionist representation of temporal sequences and in using high-level knowledge to control an attentional mechanism. We show that recognition of gait can be achieved directly from motion features, without complex shape information, and that the motion information need not be finely quantized. We show how the "what" and "where" processes in vision can be tightly coupled in a synergistic fashion. These results indicate the value of the structured connectionist paradigm in modeling perceptual processes: no previous computational model has accounted for MLD recognition and we do not know how it would be approached in any other paradigm.

Subjects/Keywords: temporal sequence; moving light display; cognitive modeling; attention; connectionist; recognition; visual sequence; visual motion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goddard, N. H. (2004). The Perception of Articulated Motion: Recognizing Moving Light Displays. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/839

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goddard, Nigel H. “The Perception of Articulated Motion: Recognizing Moving Light Displays.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/839.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goddard, Nigel H. “The Perception of Articulated Motion: Recognizing Moving Light Displays.” 2004. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Goddard NH. The Perception of Articulated Motion: Recognizing Moving Light Displays. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2004. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/839.

Council of Science Editors:

Goddard NH. The Perception of Articulated Motion: Recognizing Moving Light Displays. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/839

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