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You searched for subject:(Collaborative studying). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Brno University of Technology

1. Peška, Michal. MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - pro FIT: MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - for FIT.

Degree: 2019, Brno University of Technology

This bachelor thesis describes relatively new educational trend - Massive open online course. It is focused on its overall development and evaluation. There are introduced web platforms, which are providing these courses. These platforms are closely specified and there are gathered knowledge about them for use in the rest of this work. Following parts of thesis are focused on design and realization of a tool for collaborative studying in a real-time. This is an experiment to determine, if this concept of education is possible and what means aresuitable for use. Advisors/Committee Members: Beran, Vítězslav (advisor), Kapinus, Michal (referee).

Subjects/Keywords: MOOC; Webová aplikace; Vzdělávání; Real-time synchronizace; Spolupráce při studiu; Google Developers; REST; MOOC; Web application; Education; Real-time synchronization; Collaborative studying; Google Developers; REST

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APA (6th Edition):

Peška, M. (2019). MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - pro FIT: MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - for FIT. (Thesis). Brno University of Technology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11012/69851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peška, Michal. “MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - pro FIT: MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - for FIT.” 2019. Thesis, Brno University of Technology. Accessed December 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11012/69851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peška, Michal. “MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - pro FIT: MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - for FIT.” 2019. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Peška M. MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - pro FIT: MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - for FIT. [Internet] [Thesis]. Brno University of Technology; 2019. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11012/69851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Peška M. MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - pro FIT: MOOC - Massive Open Online Course - for FIT. [Thesis]. Brno University of Technology; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11012/69851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

2. Park, Hyechong. Framing Academic Socialization of International Undergraduates in an American University: A Critical Ethnographic Study.

Degree: PhD, ED Teaching and Learning (Columbus campus), 2009, The Ohio State University

With globalization, the number of international students is increasing in American higher education. Academic success is important to them. Grounded on critical academic socialization (Barton and Hamilton, 2005; Lea and Street, 2000), community-of-practice (Wenger, 1998), and dialogism (Bakhtin, 1981; Mercer, 1995), this ethnographic study reports findings regarding the critical academic socialization process of international English as a Second Language (ESL) for undergraduates in an American university. Data was collected with a focus on the parameters of symbolic modality (speaking and writing), unit of learning (individual and collaborative learning), and longitudinal time span. By synthesizing conceptual frameworks and empirical findings, this dissertation proposes an academic socialization model that brings together a diachronic dimension (euphoria critical academic becoming evolution phase of academic socialization) and three synchronic dimensions (contextual levels, sites, and modes of learning in academic socialization). While focusing on the critical academic becoming phase, this study highlights how the negotiation process of each focal student’s learning to write occurs idiosyncratically across intercultural, interdisciplinary, and intertextual levels. Case analysis illustrates the development of critical literacy stance of each focal student (i.e.), analytical, questioning, and contesting literacies), which can counter the myth of silent transience of L2 international undergraduates in the U.S. Cross-case analysis also suggests that the culture of this study population is silent resistance, grounded on the textual, institutional, and discursive practices, prompts me to propose a theory of discourse hybridization to change the current status quo of commercialization and citizenship discourse in one American state university. Secondly, using cross-case analysis from the zoom-out perspective, this study reports that learning opportunities in the out-of-classroom sites can be as important as classroom sites for increasing student learning outcomes. This finding broadens our understanding of the process of learning to write and speak in a social network of peers and family, in addition to using institutional resources such as writing centers. Thirdly, using spoken discourse analysis from the zoom-in perspective, this study explicates how dialogic thinking (i.e., dialogism) contributes to students’ learning outcomes through monologic coordination and dialogic collaboration with others. By portraying how international undergraduates resiliently adapt to situations, and how these students contingently and creatively use social resources for achieving their academic goals, this study sheds light on the creative, enabling, and positive force of L2 international ESL undergraduates in their negotiation of literacies individually and collaboratively. Advisors/Committee Members: Selfe, Cynthia L. (Advisor), Halasek, Evonne (Committee Co-Chair), Kantor-Martin, Rebecca (Committee Co-Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Language; Literacy; Teaching; socialization; academic literacy; identity; dialogism; collaborative learning; L2; studying abroad; community of practice; critical ethnography

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Park, H. (2009). Framing Academic Socialization of International Undergraduates in an American University: A Critical Ethnographic Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1245434397

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Park, Hyechong. “Framing Academic Socialization of International Undergraduates in an American University: A Critical Ethnographic Study.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed December 03, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1245434397.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Park, Hyechong. “Framing Academic Socialization of International Undergraduates in an American University: A Critical Ethnographic Study.” 2009. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Park H. Framing Academic Socialization of International Undergraduates in an American University: A Critical Ethnographic Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1245434397.

Council of Science Editors:

Park H. Framing Academic Socialization of International Undergraduates in an American University: A Critical Ethnographic Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1245434397

3. Yu, Geralyn. Professional development through the study of children's interests: the use of collaborative inquiry and documentation protocol among early childhood teachers.

Degree: PhD, 1144, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation investigated how a group of early childhood teachers and I, as a facilitator, collaboratively studied the interests of children enrolled in a government supported childcare facility. In this study, we explored the use of documentation protocol for incorporating children’s interests in early childhood curriculum planning. In addition, the documentation protocol strategies were used to enhance our professional growth as teachers and facilitator. While there is extensive writings on different forms of curriculum that focus on children’s interests (Beane, 1997; Cremin, 1961; Dewey, 1900; Katz, 1999), there is little research on the processes teachers might use to study these interests (Birbili & Tsitouridou, 2008; Gestwicki, 2010). Two documentation protocols influenced our approach towards studying children’s interests, descriptive review and the documentation practices of the Reggio Emilia preschools. Both of these approaches employ educational inquiry methodologies that involve studying children’s learning capabilities, growth, and interests. Self-study and action research methodologies were employed to investigate our praxis of studying children’s interests. I used self-study to examine my own practices and reflections as the facilitator of collaborative weekly team meetings. I used action research to investigate how the teachers and I, as facilitator, collaboratively studied documentation collected from classrooms that represented children’s interests. The findings from this study suggest that collaborative projects that deal with collection of documentation, reflection on real classroom experiences, and joint curriculum planning allow for genuine problem solving in a socially constructed format. Advisors/Committee Members: Johnston-Parsons, Marilyn A. (advisor), Johnston-Parsons, Marilyn A. (Committee Chair), Bresler, Liora (committee member), Noffke, Susan E. (committee member), Kennedy, Devorah (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: studying children's interests; documentation protocol; early childhood education; collaborative professional development; collaborative inquiry; facilitators; self-study; Action Research

…74 Figure 7. Collaborative weekly team meeting focus group… …95 Figure 10. Collaborative team meetings… …myself as facilitator during our collaborative discussion of children’s interests in weekly… …Both of these approaches employ educational inquiry methodologies that involve studying… …discussions led to collaborative plans for classroom activities. Embedded in these discussions, were… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yu, G. (2012). Professional development through the study of children's interests: the use of collaborative inquiry and documentation protocol among early childhood teachers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34328

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Geralyn. “Professional development through the study of children's interests: the use of collaborative inquiry and documentation protocol among early childhood teachers.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed December 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34328.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Geralyn. “Professional development through the study of children's interests: the use of collaborative inquiry and documentation protocol among early childhood teachers.” 2012. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Yu G. Professional development through the study of children's interests: the use of collaborative inquiry and documentation protocol among early childhood teachers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34328.

Council of Science Editors:

Yu G. Professional development through the study of children's interests: the use of collaborative inquiry and documentation protocol among early childhood teachers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34328

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