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You searched for subject:(CinemaScope). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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UCLA

1. Block, Brian. The New Dimension in Sight and Sound - CinemaScope 55 and the Challenges of Preserving Obsolete Media.

Degree: Library and Information Science, 2018, UCLA

The two motion pictures made with 20th Century Fox’s CinemaScope 55 [CS55] technology, Carousel (1956) and King and I (1956), are faced with unique practical and theoretical preservation challenges. Innovated in the mid-1950s, the CS55 system utilized a non-standard 55 mm film gauge and customized playback equipment, but due to logistical complications, the technology reached its obsolescence before either of the films were released. Practically, the mechanical resources to preserve both movies from the non-standard 55 mm negatives no longer survive, even though the original film elements have remained intact. Theoretically, determining the form that the preserved works can take is also complicated - both films were initially intended to be experienced in 55mm prints and even though they were successfully reformatted into the more standard 35mm gauge, many of the technical features of the original 35mm prints can no longer be replicated. This thesis studies these complications by detailing the development of the CS55 technology in the 1950s and then exploring the creative decisions made during Fox’s preservation work on Carousel and King and I in the early 2000s. Films like Carousel and King and I risk becoming inaccessible without the customized machinery required for playback, and in an effort to maintain the cultural memory of the films, Fox recreated components of the CS55 apparatus from scratch. Although there are many health concerns that threaten a film's long-term sustainability and accessibility, like wear from use and deterioration from improper storage, I focus here on the impact of obsolescence. As I demonstrate, obsolescence can limit or completely eliminate resources for cinema technologies, and these shifts complicate the efforts of the film preservationist. While the dominant preservation trend has long been to authentically replicate a motion picture as it was originally experienced, I explore how the content is necessarily translated from obsolete carriers into active carriers when essential technology no longer exists. As evidenced by Fox’s restorations of their CinemaScope 55 films, preservation is interpretive work, and within the paradigm of obsolescence, new works are created in the process.

Subjects/Keywords: Information science; Film studies; Information technology; CinemaScope 55; Moving Image Archives; Preservation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Block, B. (2018). The New Dimension in Sight and Sound - CinemaScope 55 and the Challenges of Preserving Obsolete Media. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7gx3w1w6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Block, Brian. “The New Dimension in Sight and Sound - CinemaScope 55 and the Challenges of Preserving Obsolete Media.” 2018. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7gx3w1w6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Block, Brian. “The New Dimension in Sight and Sound - CinemaScope 55 and the Challenges of Preserving Obsolete Media.” 2018. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Block B. The New Dimension in Sight and Sound - CinemaScope 55 and the Challenges of Preserving Obsolete Media. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7gx3w1w6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Block B. The New Dimension in Sight and Sound - CinemaScope 55 and the Challenges of Preserving Obsolete Media. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2018. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/7gx3w1w6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

2. Cossar, John Harper. Snakes and Funerals: Aesthetics and American Widescreen Films.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2007, Georgia State University

The study of widescreen cinema historically has been under analyzed with regard to aesthetics. This project examines the visual poetics of the wide frame from the silent films of Griffith and Gance to the CinemaScope grandeur of Preminger and Tashlin. Additionally, the roles of auteur and genre are explored as well as the new media possibilities such as letterboxing online content. If cinema’s history can be compared to painting, then prior to 1953, cinema existed as a portrait-only operation with a premium placed on vertical compositions. This is not to say that landscape shots were not possible or that lateral mise-en-scene did not exist. Cinematic texts, with very few exceptions, were composed in only one shape: the almost square Academy Ratio. Before 1953, cinema’s shape is that of portraiture; after 1953 cinema’s shape is landscape. Widescreen filmmaking is not simply an alternative to previous visual representation in cinema because no equivalent exists. Widescreen is quite simply a break from previous stylistic norms because the shape of the frame itself has been drastically reconfigured. With the proliferation of HDTV and widescreen computer monitors, certain aspect ratios that were once regarded as specifically “cinematic” are now commonplace both in the home and in the workplace. This project outlines a project that traces the innovations and aesthetic developments of widescreen aspect ratios from the silent era of D.W Griffith, Buster Keaton and Abel Gance all the way through to current widescreen digital manifestations of web-based media and digital “blanks” such as those created by Pixar. Other chapters include close textual analyses of “experimental” widescreen films of 1930, the development of “norms” for widescreen filmmaking in the early CinemaScope era of the 1950s and examinations of the experimental multi-screen mosaics of 1968 and beyond. Advisors/Committee Members: Greg M. Smith - Chair, Matthew Bernstein, Kathy Fuller-Seeley, Jack Boozer, Angelo Restivo.

Subjects/Keywords: Widescreen; HDTV; Letterbox; CinemaScope; Auteur; Genre; Preminger; Tashlin; Ray; Sirk; Fleischer; Griffith; Gance; Keaton; Aesthetics; Aspect ratio; Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cossar, J. H. (2007). Snakes and Funerals: Aesthetics and American Widescreen Films. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/communication_diss/12

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cossar, John Harper. “Snakes and Funerals: Aesthetics and American Widescreen Films.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/communication_diss/12.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cossar, John Harper. “Snakes and Funerals: Aesthetics and American Widescreen Films.” 2007. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Cossar JH. Snakes and Funerals: Aesthetics and American Widescreen Films. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/communication_diss/12.

Council of Science Editors:

Cossar JH. Snakes and Funerals: Aesthetics and American Widescreen Films. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2007. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/communication_diss/12

.