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You searched for subject:(Christian Year). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Yap, teck chong. Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for Christian Year.

Degree: 2012, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for the Christian Year is a work for soprano, tenor, and baritone soloists, congregational hymns, mixed chorus, piano, and organ. The purpose of this work is to retell the story of God's redemption to Christian believers in local church worship through hymns and music. This work consists of two cycles: "Cycle of Light" and "Cycle of Life." "The Cycle of Light" consists of Advent, Christmas and Epiphany, and Jesus' Teaching. It tells the story of Jesus as the Light as He incarnates into human form to save the world, whereas the "Cycle of Life" includes Lent, Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Passiontide, Eastertide, Ascensiontide, and Trinity. They tell the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, who gave His life to the world, so that the world might gain life. The music is written in functional harmony; however, there are cluster chords, dissonant harmonic intervals, and unconventional vocal leaps. There are symmetrical and asymmetrical musical phrases. Musical forms are mostly structured in modified strophic. Advisors/Committee Members: Landgrave, J. Phillip (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Anthem; Christian Year; Liturgy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yap, t. c. (2012). Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for Christian Year. (Thesis). Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10392/3959

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yap, teck chong. “Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for Christian Year.” 2012. Thesis, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10392/3959.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yap, teck chong. “Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for Christian Year.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Yap tc. Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for Christian Year. [Internet] [Thesis]. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10392/3959.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yap tc. Prince of Life: An Anthem Cycle for Christian Year. [Thesis]. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10392/3959

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Bowling Green State University

2. Coley, Toby F. DIGITAL MEDIA ETHICS IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM.

Degree: PhD, English (Rhetoric and Writing), 2011, Bowling Green State University

With increasing awareness, digital media initiatives on a national level have permeated higher education. The permeation continues into the first year writing classroom. Neal Postman (1996) has argued that no one has taken up the call to implement new technologies with greater enthusiasm than the educator. Many writing educators believe that preparing students for the 21st century requires teaching students multiple technological literacies (Selber, 2004; New London Group, 2000) and bringing digital media into the classroom is one way to accomplish course goals while working with these literacies. In addition, research supports the use of digital media in the writing classroom and argues for capitalizing on student’s native literacies, but little scholarship explores the ethical implications of digital media implementation. Simultaneously, the ethical turn in Writing Studies has developed a plethora of articles, books, and presentations on participant treatment, research ethics, and even ethical pedagogies, but again, little has attempted to bring together how we use digital media in our pedagogies with an explicitly ethical focus. One aspect of understanding these pedagogies is exploring how teachers and administrators come to view concerns as ethical, something that requires an investigation of worldview. This research seeks to merge these areas through case study methods, drawing on an activity theory framework that uses grounded theory to analyze the data. By interviewing an instructor and writing program administrator at a public university and a private, faith-based college, this work expands on two ethical approaches to digital media from two very important sites in higher education. The implications of the data provide important additions to our understanding of ethical pedagogies of digital media use. The goal of this study is to discern what the instructors and administrators view as ethical concerns when implementing digital media and to learn how differing approaches impact outlook and outcomes. By drawing on these approaches, a more consistent ethical awareness develops that positions those involved with writing courses to better prepare their students for the ethical needs of the 21st century. The results of the study examine the areas of audience awareness and academic honesty (chapter five) as well as teaching the rhetorical principles of writing, underscoring digital literacy and information awareness, developing students’ ethical literacy, and providing the support structures needed to effectively implement digital media (chapter six). This study concludes by offering a set of implications and heuristics (chapter seven) that can be used in decisions to implement digital media in the writing classroom. Advisors/Committee Members: Blair, Kristine (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Composition; ethics; digital media; first-year writing; composition; writing; pedagogy; worldview; Christian; secular

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coley, T. F. (2011). DIGITAL MEDIA ETHICS IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM. (Doctoral Dissertation). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1296093364

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coley, Toby F. “DIGITAL MEDIA ETHICS IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Bowling Green State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1296093364.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coley, Toby F. “DIGITAL MEDIA ETHICS IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM.” 2011. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Coley TF. DIGITAL MEDIA ETHICS IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1296093364.

Council of Science Editors:

Coley TF. DIGITAL MEDIA ETHICS IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1296093364


Bowling Green State University

3. Marsh, Brent Alan. EXAMINING THE PERSONAL FINANCE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND KNOWLEDGE LEVELS OF FIRST-YEAR AND SENIOR STUDENTS AT BAPTIST UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE OF TEXAS.

Degree: PhD, Higher Education Administration, 2006, Bowling Green State University

For nearly four decades scholars from various disciplines have studied college students' personal finance characteristics, primarily examining collegians' knowledge of consumer finance issues, but occasionally considering their attitudes or behaviors. In recent years there has been a surge in research projects examining college students' personal finance characteristics. No studies were found that simultaneously examined students' personal finance attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge, nor did the literature reveal research focused on the subjects of this study: students enrolled at Baptist universities in Texas. The purpose of this study, which was guided by eight research questions, was to examine the personal finance attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge levels of freshmen and seniors at Baptist universities in Texas, and to allow student affairs administrators employed at these institutions to offer their perceptions of students' personal finance characteristics and to provide suggestions regarding how institutions might address personal finance education. Online surveys were employed for data collection. Six Baptist universities in Texas were included in the study, 2,100 students (350 per institution, 175 first-year students and 175 seniors) were systematically sampled, and 408 (19%) usable surveys were completed. A convenience sample of student affairs administrators (n = 169) was selected and 100 (59%) usable surveys were completed. Data were primarily quantitative in nature, though administrators were encouraged to provide written comments that were analyzed through basic qualitative techniques. Most research questions, however, were answered through descriptive statistics, t tests, or ANOVA procedures. Seniors demonstrated significantly better personal finance attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge than first-year students. To a significant degree compared with first-year students, seniors credited their university experience with helping to improve their knowledge, while first-year students significantly differed from seniors in attributing the university experience with influencing their attitudes. Student affairs administrators consistently rated students' personal finance characteristics significantly lower than students rated themselves, and administrators generally felt college students lacked sound personal finance attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge. It was concluded that Christian-based universities should implement personal finance initiatives to fulfill their distinctive missions and prepare graduates for successful stewardship of fiscal resources, emphases that could become a hallmark of Christian-based higher education. Advisors/Committee Members: DeBard, Robert (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Personal Finance; College Students; First-year Students; Freshmen; Seniors; Baptist Higher Education; Christian Higher Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marsh, B. A. (2006). EXAMINING THE PERSONAL FINANCE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND KNOWLEDGE LEVELS OF FIRST-YEAR AND SENIOR STUDENTS AT BAPTIST UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE OF TEXAS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1151189375

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marsh, Brent Alan. “EXAMINING THE PERSONAL FINANCE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND KNOWLEDGE LEVELS OF FIRST-YEAR AND SENIOR STUDENTS AT BAPTIST UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE OF TEXAS.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Bowling Green State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1151189375.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marsh, Brent Alan. “EXAMINING THE PERSONAL FINANCE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND KNOWLEDGE LEVELS OF FIRST-YEAR AND SENIOR STUDENTS AT BAPTIST UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE OF TEXAS.” 2006. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Marsh BA. EXAMINING THE PERSONAL FINANCE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND KNOWLEDGE LEVELS OF FIRST-YEAR AND SENIOR STUDENTS AT BAPTIST UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE OF TEXAS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2006. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1151189375.

Council of Science Editors:

Marsh BA. EXAMINING THE PERSONAL FINANCE ATTITUDES, BEHAVIORS, AND KNOWLEDGE LEVELS OF FIRST-YEAR AND SENIOR STUDENTS AT BAPTIST UNIVERSITIES IN THE STATE OF TEXAS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2006. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1151189375

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