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You searched for subject:(Charles Frazier). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. French, Marsha Ellen. Mystical reading.

Degree: 2014, University of Georgia

In a novel about journeys, the literary journey of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain encompasses all. As the two main characters, Ada and Inman, journey towards home and emotional openness and away from their respective pasts, they also journey towards a deeper relationship with books, and thus words, symbols, and composition. Through reading William Bartram's Travels, Inman gains guidance on his dangerous path. By trading her classical Charleston education for natural study, Ada gains independence and builds a relationship with her new home. Ultimately, these literary journeys pervade every aspect of the characters' lives as they transcend texts to mystically experience words, each other, and Cold Mountain itself.

Subjects/Keywords: "Cold Mountain"; Charles Frazier; William Bartram; Nature; Journeys; Mysticism

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APA (6th Edition):

French, M. E. (2014). Mystical reading. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/24610

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

French, Marsha Ellen. “Mystical reading.” 2014. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed May 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/24610.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

French, Marsha Ellen. “Mystical reading.” 2014. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

French ME. Mystical reading. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/24610.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

French ME. Mystical reading. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/24610

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


East Tennessee State University

2. Gilreath, Heather Rhea. Coming Home, Staying Put, and Learning to Fiddle: Heroism and Place in Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain.

Degree: MA, English, 2004, East Tennessee State University

In his novel Cold Mountain, Charles Frazier weaves an intricate web of human stories, all converging to make a memorable statement about love, war, life, and death. This study examines these stories and the mythological, literary, and folk models Frazier employs, and in some cases revises, to tell them. The first chapter explores how Frazier recreates Odysseus in Inman, his main male character, to depict the psychological trauma inflicted by war. The second chapter focuses on Ada, Inman’s pre-war sweetheart, and Ruby, a girl with whom Ada bonds, as challenges to the male pastoral tradition. Ruby’s father Stobrod as trickster, culture hero, and ultimate keeper/creator of songs is the subject of the third chapter. Since Appalachia so strongly influences each of these characters, whether native or outsider, this thesis will also discuss such sense of place and prove that these stories, though universal, could not take place just anywhere.

Subjects/Keywords: Cold Mountain; Charles Frazier; Appalachian Literature; Southern Literature; Civil War Literature; the Odyssey; Arts and Humanities; English Language and Literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gilreath, H. R. (2004). Coming Home, Staying Put, and Learning to Fiddle: Heroism and Place in Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain. (Thesis). East Tennessee State University. Retrieved from https://dc.etsu.edu/etd/921

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gilreath, Heather Rhea. “Coming Home, Staying Put, and Learning to Fiddle: Heroism and Place in Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain.” 2004. Thesis, East Tennessee State University. Accessed May 06, 2021. https://dc.etsu.edu/etd/921.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gilreath, Heather Rhea. “Coming Home, Staying Put, and Learning to Fiddle: Heroism and Place in Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain.” 2004. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Gilreath HR. Coming Home, Staying Put, and Learning to Fiddle: Heroism and Place in Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain. [Internet] [Thesis]. East Tennessee State University; 2004. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: https://dc.etsu.edu/etd/921.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gilreath HR. Coming Home, Staying Put, and Learning to Fiddle: Heroism and Place in Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain. [Thesis]. East Tennessee State University; 2004. Available from: https://dc.etsu.edu/etd/921

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Louisiana State University

3. Smithpeters, Jeffrey Neal. "To the latest generation": Cold War and Post Cold War U.S. Civil War novels in their social contexts.

Degree: PhD, English Language and Literature, 2005, Louisiana State University

This dissertation argues that readings of the Civil War novels published in America since 1955 should be informed by a consciousness of the social forces at work in each author’s time. Part One consists of a study of the popular Civil War novel, 1955’s Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor; part two, 1974’s The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara. Chapters One through Three explain that Kantor was especially fitted for the ideological work going on in Andersonville, then outlines the way that novel tried to contribute to the transition between World War II and the Cold War. The book attempted to aid in the process by which Americans were persuaded to shoulder the financial and military burden for the protection of West Germany and West Berlin. Chapters Three and Four examine The Killer Angels, arguing that Shaara’s decision to feature Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the Twentieth Maine’s defense of Little Round Top is a working-through of the longing for a different, more creative style of leadership after the Vietnam War came to be perceived widely as a disaster. On the Confederate side, the conflict between Generals Robert E. Lee and James Longstreet parallels the conflict over the war in Vietnam. Part Three examines about a dozen Civil War novels published in America in the past twenty-five years. In Chapter Five, I argue that these novels partake in the postmodern tendency toward the creation of characters who experience a confusion of perception and identity in the face of the unending cascade of information coming at them, and respond in ways typical of postmodern characters. Chapter Six offers three models for the way contemporary novels explore the Civil War’s meaning: the multiplicity novel, the 1990s anti-war model, and the counter-narrative model, which are all described using examples of each kind of book.

Subjects/Keywords: Howard Bahr; Cold Mountain; Charles Frazier; Donald McCaig; MacKinlay Kantor; Andersonville; Michael Shaara; The Killer Angels; postmodernism; Vietnam War; John F. Kennedy; holocaust; new historicism; Ishmael Reed; Gore Vidal; David Madden; Alice Randall; The Black Flower; Allan Gurganus

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smithpeters, J. N. (2005). "To the latest generation": Cold War and Post Cold War U.S. Civil War novels in their social contexts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Louisiana State University. Retrieved from etd-04142005-121818 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/2933

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smithpeters, Jeffrey Neal. “"To the latest generation": Cold War and Post Cold War U.S. Civil War novels in their social contexts.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Louisiana State University. Accessed May 06, 2021. etd-04142005-121818 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/2933.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smithpeters, Jeffrey Neal. “"To the latest generation": Cold War and Post Cold War U.S. Civil War novels in their social contexts.” 2005. Web. 06 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Smithpeters JN. "To the latest generation": Cold War and Post Cold War U.S. Civil War novels in their social contexts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2005. [cited 2021 May 06]. Available from: etd-04142005-121818 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/2933.

Council of Science Editors:

Smithpeters JN. "To the latest generation": Cold War and Post Cold War U.S. Civil War novels in their social contexts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2005. Available from: etd-04142005-121818 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/2933

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