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You searched for subject:(Charles Burnett). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. McFadden, Donte L. Be a Man If You Can: Examining Pre-Migration and Post-Watts Revolt Identities of Black Working-Class Men in the Films of Charles Burnett, 1969-1990.

Degree: PhD, English, 2013, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

The films of Charles Burnett from 1969 through 1990 focus on the presentation of black working-class men in South Los Angeles as the decline of industrial jobs alters the socioeconomic landscape. Two periods that are important to understand the historical reference of Burnett's films are the Second Great Migration, in which African Americans evacuate the oppressive climate of Jim Crow to live in Los Angeles during World War II, and the Watts Revolt, a week in August in which residents of the Watts region revolted against law enforcement and business owners in response to the treatment of two African American motorists by California Highway Patrolmen. Burnett's films contain influences from Third Cinema and Modernist European Cinema, as shown in the use of handheld cameras on location shoots with non-professional actors. Burnett's earlier films rely on an episodic narrative structure to follow how his black male protagonists either transform their lives to adjust to the now-limited work opportunities, or stagnate themselves because the new climate has made them apathetic towards any hope for progress. His later films incorporate spatial narration, a storytelling strategy that relies on the formula of the classical Hollywood narrative. Rather than use this narrative structure commonly found in mainstream American cinema to establish a conflict, climax, and resolution within the story, Burnett is more focused on the relationship between space and time, demonstrated in the onscreen presence of older and younger characters and issues that pertain to both historical (i.e. migration era) and contemporary (i.e. post-Watts Revolt) identity. Ultimately, this project identifies components in Burnett's filmmaking style and storytelling approach that allow him to present the lives of black working-class men of South Los Angeles and how they are effective. Advisors/Committee Members: Vicki A. Callahan.

Subjects/Keywords: African American Independent Cinema; Charles Burnett; L.A. Rebellion; South Los Angeles; Watts Revolt; African American Studies; Film and Media Studies

…TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction The Early Cinema of Charles Burnett— Portraits of… …Introduction: The Early Cinema of Charles Burnett— Portraits of Traditional and Contemporary Working… …Charles Burnett”) Deep focus in Burnett’s presentation of historical and contemporary… …Class Masculine Identities in South Los Angeles This dissertation focuses on Charles Burnett’s… …to accept that advice and those practices. Burnett argues that such adherence makes these… 

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APA (6th Edition):

McFadden, D. L. (2013). Be a Man If You Can: Examining Pre-Migration and Post-Watts Revolt Identities of Black Working-Class Men in the Films of Charles Burnett, 1969-1990. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Retrieved from https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/333

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McFadden, Donte L. “Be a Man If You Can: Examining Pre-Migration and Post-Watts Revolt Identities of Black Working-Class Men in the Films of Charles Burnett, 1969-1990.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Accessed April 01, 2020. https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/333.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McFadden, Donte L. “Be a Man If You Can: Examining Pre-Migration and Post-Watts Revolt Identities of Black Working-Class Men in the Films of Charles Burnett, 1969-1990.” 2013. Web. 01 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

McFadden DL. Be a Man If You Can: Examining Pre-Migration and Post-Watts Revolt Identities of Black Working-Class Men in the Films of Charles Burnett, 1969-1990. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee; 2013. [cited 2020 Apr 01]. Available from: https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/333.

Council of Science Editors:

McFadden DL. Be a Man If You Can: Examining Pre-Migration and Post-Watts Revolt Identities of Black Working-Class Men in the Films of Charles Burnett, 1969-1990. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee; 2013. Available from: https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/333

2. Watkins, Sean Davis. The Turning Point of Who Shall Be Master: Killer of Sheep, Naming, Gender, and the Gaze of African American Women.

Degree: MAST, Interdisciplinary Studies, 2016, Kennesaw State University

Charles Burnett’s 1978 award-winning film Killer of Sheep directly responded to the then-popular Blaxploitation genre, holding a mirror up to post-Watts, 1970s America, while exposing and exploring gender and race issues. Moreover, intentionally or not, Burnett, with this film, effectively demonstrated the lack of recognition that Black women faced in domestic, activist, and employment spheres; simultaneously, Burnett conspicuously reified the relegation of women into that silent, domestic sphere while challenging stereotypes of Black men, elevating them and establishing them as humans, capable of hubris, humanity, and vulnerability. This neo-realistic film masterfully rebirthed the African American male identity; unfortunately, though, neglected to uplift Black women from the roles that far preceded Blaxploitation. Blaxploitation largely perpetuated socially-destructive stereotypes of the African American family and community as a whole. Killer of Sheep responded by revealing the complexity of African American families, as opposed to Blaxploitation’s two-dimensional, caricatures of African Americans. In this thesis I demonstrate the relationship between the historical cultivation of images of African Americans in the media and expectations of African American women. I then position Killer of Sheep in its rightful place as a response to Blaxploitation and argue that while Burnett elevated the African American man and even family, he wrongly disregarded African American women as powerful and independent, leaving them to respond to the newly-elevated Black male. Ultimately Killer of Sheep is an avant garde film functioning as a site of resistance in the more popular sea of Blaxploitation, and deserves scholarly attention. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Robbie Lieberman, Dr. David A. King.

Subjects/Keywords: L.A. Film School; Film Studies; Civil Rights; Blaxploitation; Charles Burnett; Neorealism; African American Studies; American Film Studies; Other Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Women's Studies

…would have every scene memorized.”6 In Senses of Cinema, Nelson Kim compares Charles Burnett… …internationally-renowned filmmaker Miklós 6 Nelson Kim, “Great Directors: Charles Burnett,” Senses of… …15 Killer of Sheep is now included in the film canon of masterpieces and Charles Burnett is… …Watts area of Los Angeles, Burnett witnessed this exploitation, and he wanted to use his… …stereotypes, Burnett stated that there was normalcy to blackness, there was vulnerability and… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Watkins, S. D. (2016). The Turning Point of Who Shall Be Master: Killer of Sheep, Naming, Gender, and the Gaze of African American Women. (Thesis). Kennesaw State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/mast_etd/4

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watkins, Sean Davis. “The Turning Point of Who Shall Be Master: Killer of Sheep, Naming, Gender, and the Gaze of African American Women.” 2016. Thesis, Kennesaw State University. Accessed April 01, 2020. https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/mast_etd/4.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watkins, Sean Davis. “The Turning Point of Who Shall Be Master: Killer of Sheep, Naming, Gender, and the Gaze of African American Women.” 2016. Web. 01 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Watkins SD. The Turning Point of Who Shall Be Master: Killer of Sheep, Naming, Gender, and the Gaze of African American Women. [Internet] [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Apr 01]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/mast_etd/4.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Watkins SD. The Turning Point of Who Shall Be Master: Killer of Sheep, Naming, Gender, and the Gaze of African American Women. [Thesis]. Kennesaw State University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/mast_etd/4

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.