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You searched for subject:(Cerebral Hemovelocity). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Cincinnati

1. Funke, Matthew E. A Comparison of Cerebral Hemovelocity and Blood Oxygen Saturation Levels During Vigilance Performance.

Degree: MA, Arts and Sciences : Psychology, 2009, University of Cincinnati

This study compared measures of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and blood oxygen saturation (rSO2), during the performance of a 40-min vigilance task. Observers monitored a simulated air-traffic control display for flight path deviations which occurred in a unidirectional or a multidirectional context. CBFV and rSO2 measures were secured from the medial cerebral arteries in the left and right cerebral hemispheres and from the corresponding frontal lobes, respectively. Performance efficiency was greater in the unidirectional than the multidirectional condition and declined over time in both conditions, more so in the multidirectional condition. This pattern of results was paralleled in different ways by the two hemodynamic measures. A result of this sort challenges the assumption of a close tie between cerebral blood flow and oxygen saturation (Siesjo, 1978) and supports recent findings (Mintun et al., 2001) that cerebral blood flow and oxygen levels are not tightly coupled in active brain states. Advisors/Committee Members: Matthews, Gerald (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Experiments; cerebral hemovelocity; oxygen saturation; cbfv; rso2; vigilance; hemispheric lateralization

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APA (6th Edition):

Funke, M. E. (2009). A Comparison of Cerebral Hemovelocity and Blood Oxygen Saturation Levels During Vigilance Performance. (Masters Thesis). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1258666953

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Funke, Matthew E. “A Comparison of Cerebral Hemovelocity and Blood Oxygen Saturation Levels During Vigilance Performance.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Cincinnati. Accessed June 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1258666953.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Funke, Matthew E. “A Comparison of Cerebral Hemovelocity and Blood Oxygen Saturation Levels During Vigilance Performance.” 2009. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Funke ME. A Comparison of Cerebral Hemovelocity and Blood Oxygen Saturation Levels During Vigilance Performance. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1258666953.

Council of Science Editors:

Funke ME. A Comparison of Cerebral Hemovelocity and Blood Oxygen Saturation Levels During Vigilance Performance. [Masters Thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1258666953

2. Funke, Matthew E. Neuroergonomic and Stress Dynamics Associated with Spatial Uncertainty During Vigilance Task Performance.

Degree: PhD, Arts and Sciences: Psychology, 2011, University of Cincinnati

Neuroergonomics is an emerging field in human factors that studies brain functions underlying performance at work (Parasuraman, 2011; Parasuraman & Rizzo, 2007). The operational dimension featured in this study was vigilance or sustained attention which plays a major role in many automated human-machine systems. Two elements of the neuroergonomic approach, task-induced changes in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV, measured via transcranial Doppler sonography) and oculometrics (gaze control measured via saccadic frequency and dwell time and fatigue measured via blink frequency and duration, and eye closure) were used along with a measure of task-induced stress (the Dundee Stress State questionnaire, DSSQ, Matthews et al., 2002) to integrate the effects of a heretofore ignored psychophysical factor into the neuroergonomic and stress mosaic that underscores vigilance performance. That factor was spatial uncertainty or uncertainty as to where in the visual field critical signals for detection will occur. Observers assumed the role of an Air Force controller monitoring a squadron of four unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) flying in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction during a 50-min vigil. Critical signals for detection were cases in which one of the vehicles was flying in an inappropriate direction relative to its cohorts. In a spatial uncertainty condition, images of the UAV squadron that needed to be inspected for the presence of critical signals could appear at random in any one of five locations on the controller’s display. In a spatial certainty condition, squadron images always appeared in a predetermined fixed location. Performance efficiency was found to be greater in the context of spatial certainty than uncertainty and to decline over time in both conditions. These performance effects were accompanied by a temporal decline in CBFV in the right hemisphere that was steeper in the presence of spatial uncertainty than certainty, a result consistent with the view that there is a right hemispheric system in control of vigilance (Warm, Matthews & Parasuraman, 2009). Visual scanning activity exhibited a temporal decline in saccadic frequency and an increase in fixation duration, indicative of temporally based reductions in active visual sampling, but these changes were not consistently more evident in the spatial uncertainty context. Ocular measures of fatigue were found to increase over time in both cases, and were significantly greater in the spatial uncertainty context in terms of blink frequency and the percentage of eye closure. Based on the DSSQ scores, observers found their vigilance assignment to be stressful as reflected in a loss of task engagement and an increase in distress over the course of the vigil. These effects however, did not differ in the spatial certainty/uncertainty conditions The results of this study were considered in relation to the utility of a resource model in accounting for the effects of spatial uncertainty and task duration on vigilance performance and stress, and in relation… Advisors/Committee Members: Matthews, Gerald (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; neuroergonomics; cerebral hemovelocity; ocular activity; vigilance; spatial uncertainty; stress

…6. Hemovelocity scores in the left and right cerebral hemispheres for the spatially… …machine systems. Two elements of the neuroergonomic approach, task-induced changes in cerebral… …___________________________________________________________________ 2 Cerebral Hemodynamics ______________________________________________ 5 Brain Imaging… …_______________________________________________________________________ 40 Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity _____________________________________________ 40 Control… …efficiency _________________________________________________________________ 50 Cerebral… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Funke, M. E. (2011). Neuroergonomic and Stress Dynamics Associated with Spatial Uncertainty During Vigilance Task Performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1313773072

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Funke, Matthew E. “Neuroergonomic and Stress Dynamics Associated with Spatial Uncertainty During Vigilance Task Performance.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed June 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1313773072.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Funke, Matthew E. “Neuroergonomic and Stress Dynamics Associated with Spatial Uncertainty During Vigilance Task Performance.” 2011. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Funke ME. Neuroergonomic and Stress Dynamics Associated with Spatial Uncertainty During Vigilance Task Performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2011. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1313773072.

Council of Science Editors:

Funke ME. Neuroergonomic and Stress Dynamics Associated with Spatial Uncertainty During Vigilance Task Performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1313773072


University of Cincinnati

3. Shaw, Tyler H. Effects of Signal Modality and Event Asynchrony on Vigilance Performance and Cerebral Hemovelocity.

Degree: MA, Arts and Sciences : Psychology, 2006, University of Cincinnati

Transcranial Doppler sonography was used to examine the effects of the sensory modality of signals and event asynchrony on blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the cerebral hemispheres during the performance of a 40 –min vigilance task. Observers monitored pulses of light or sound for changes in duration under conditions in which the stimulus events to be scrutinized for the presence of critical signals occurred in a temporally regular (synchronous) or irregular (asynchronous) manner. Consistent with expectations derived from a sensory equivalence model of vigilance performance, overall signal detections and CBFV declined linearly over time in a manner that was independent of the sensory channels employed for stimulus delivery. Hemispheric differences in the overall decline in CBFV and in temporal changes in CBFV associated with the synchronous and asynchronous event conditions suggest that a cooperative interaction model may best describe the role of cerebral functioning in the control of vigilance performance. Advisors/Committee Members: Warm, Dr. Joel (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology, Experimental; Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD); Cerebral Hemovelocity; Sensory Modality; Event Asnychrony; Sensory equivalence; Temporal uncertainty

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shaw, T. H. (2006). Effects of Signal Modality and Event Asynchrony on Vigilance Performance and Cerebral Hemovelocity. (Masters Thesis). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1154632131

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shaw, Tyler H. “Effects of Signal Modality and Event Asynchrony on Vigilance Performance and Cerebral Hemovelocity.” 2006. Masters Thesis, University of Cincinnati. Accessed June 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1154632131.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shaw, Tyler H. “Effects of Signal Modality and Event Asynchrony on Vigilance Performance and Cerebral Hemovelocity.” 2006. Web. 17 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Shaw TH. Effects of Signal Modality and Event Asynchrony on Vigilance Performance and Cerebral Hemovelocity. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2006. [cited 2019 Jun 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1154632131.

Council of Science Editors:

Shaw TH. Effects of Signal Modality and Event Asynchrony on Vigilance Performance and Cerebral Hemovelocity. [Masters Thesis]. University of Cincinnati; 2006. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1154632131

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