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You searched for subject:(Ceduna). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. MacDonald, Justin. Origin and structure of the Ceduna delta system, offshore South Australia.

Degree: 2013, University of Adelaide

This thesis consists of five papers, each of which complements the regional understanding of the Ceduna Delta System, offshore South Australia. Deltas commonly form linked systems of extension, on the delta top, and compression, in the delta toe. This link is promoted by the presence of a detachment layer of more ductile sediments at the base of the delta, which mechanically decouples deltaic sediments from those beneath it. These systems are often explained using Critical Taper Wedge mechanics, which is commonly applied to understand the rock strength properties and the role of pore fluid pressure at the base of the wedge (within the detachment layer) and within the wedge, in these linked systems of extension and compression. To better understand the effect of basal pore fluid pressure on delta—deepwater fold thrust belt systems, I present an in-depth application of Critical Taper Wedge mechanics to the data-rich deepwater Niger Delta Toe in West Africa, a modern day analogue for the ancient Ceduna Sub-basin (Paper 1). This application involved developing a new technique to measure key variables from seismic reflection data in the Niger Delta Toe and input them into a script to calculate the basal pore fluid pressure required to form the observed present-day geometries. With this new approach and increased understanding of the role of basal pore fluid pressure on delta wedge geometry it was possible to better understand how detachment variables control distribution of the lobes that comprise the Cretaceous-age Ceduna Delta. Regional structural mapping of the Ceduna Delta resulted in separation of the delta lobes based on tectonic style and also examining the linkages between the systems, explaining the unique stacking of the delta tops while each system maintained independent deepwater fold-thrust belts (Paper 2). Furthermore, detailed 3D seismic reflection data is interpreted to investigate inversion structures and potential for fault reactivation in the basin (Paper 3). The boundary element method geomechanical code Poly3D© was used to investigate delta-top fault reactivation potential from a 3D seismic derived fault network along with the present day stress determined from petroleum wells. Results demonstrate a moderate to high probability for contemporary reactivation of faults under a strike-slip to strike-slip-normal fault stress regime (Paper 3). In addition, detrital zircon analysis, apatite fission track analysis and zircon fission track analysis were undertaken to investigate the potential source(s) for the deltaic sediment input in the Ceduna Delta system (Paper 4). Over 1500 detrital zircon and apatite grains were analysed from petroleum wells and outcrop samples located onshore and offshore South Australia. The results indicate approximately 1-2 km of Late Cretaceous uplift/exhumation of the proximal arcuate shaped South Australian southern margin provided the source for the Santonian-Maastrichtian delta lobe, mainly from erosion of existing Permian-Cenomanian sedimentary cover. Finally, the last paper… Advisors/Committee Members: King, Rosalind Clare (advisor), Backe, Guillaume Valery Raymond (advisor), Holford, Simon Paul (advisor), Hillis, Richard Ralph (advisor), Australian School of Petroleum (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Ceduna; Bight Basin; Ceduna Delta; structure; Hammerhead Delta; White Pointer Delta; fault reactivation; hydrocarbon prospectivity; provenance; thermochronology

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APA (6th Edition):

MacDonald, J. (2013). Origin and structure of the Ceduna delta system, offshore South Australia. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82325

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

MacDonald, Justin. “Origin and structure of the Ceduna delta system, offshore South Australia.” 2013. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82325.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

MacDonald, Justin. “Origin and structure of the Ceduna delta system, offshore South Australia.” 2013. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

MacDonald J. Origin and structure of the Ceduna delta system, offshore South Australia. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82325.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

MacDonald J. Origin and structure of the Ceduna delta system, offshore South Australia. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82325

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Manchester

2. Sharples, Alexander Gabriel William david. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight.

Degree: 2014, University of Manchester

The Great Australian Bight (GAB) is an extensive W-E striking continental margin basin that drifted northwards during the Cenozoic following rifting and separation from Antarctica in the mid/late Cretaceous. Seafloor spreading accelerated in the mid-Eocene and was associated with local volcanism. The mid-Eocene succession of the GAB is conspicuously mounded and separates a dominantly siliciclastic succession below from a fully marine carbonate succession above. The mounded succession was penecontemporaneous with major changes in global climate, oceanographic conditions and tectonic re-organization in the region, and thus may hold important clues as to the palaeo-environmental changes associated with these changes. The mid Eocene has so far only been described locally or in passing, usually by studies focused on either the siliciclastics below or the carbonates above. It was therefore chosen as a major focus point for the research project reported herein. Exploration activity in the GAB has been limited despite the presence of a working petroleum system and large target structures, but industry interest has increased over the past few years leading to 3D seismic surveys being acquired in the GAB. The focus for exploration is the Cretaceous succession beneath the relatively thin Cenozoic cover, which however, is still important in terms of shallow hazards and as overburden to the anticipated productive sections. As is often the case, the new 3D seismic data shows many overburden features in great detail and thus affords new insights to be gained that improve our understanding of the post-rift evolution of the marginThis thesis expands upon and reinterprets a pre-existing sequence framework in the Cenozoic GAB based from ODP Leg 182 results. A vast database of 2D and 3D seismic surveys has been integrated with exploration wells and borehole data and several surfaces have been calibrated to borehole and well constraints, then mapped to the maximum lateral extent across the available dataset. Surface mapping provided new insight into sequence deposition and palaeoenvironmental settings. Structure maps and thickness maps highlight key depocentre locations and trends over the Cenozoic GAB as well as stacked mass debris aprons. The newly discovered sequences raise new questions regarding trigger mechanisms in a-seismic areas and feed into industry geohazard perception models.The base surface of the Cenozoic framework hosts a plethora of mounded features across shelf and basinal section. All mounds within the dataset have been mapped. A set a bryozoan reef mounds have been interpreted lying parallel to the margin as linear complexes over 500 km. They coincide with the underlying siliciclastic delta clinoform breakpoints and provide insight into the changing palaeoenvironment at the 43 Ma mark, cessation of siliciclastics and regional marine transgression. Further mound mapping aided by 3D attribute extractions along the base Cenozoic unconformity led to the interpretation of a series of enigmatic igneous-based mounded… Advisors/Committee Members: MITCHELL, NEIL NC, HOLLIS, CATHERINE C, Huuse, Mads, Mitchell, Neil, Hollis, Catherine.

Subjects/Keywords: Great Australian Bight; Ceduna; Eyre; Southern Ocean; Bryozoans; Carbonate Reefs; Cool-water Carbonates

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sharples, A. G. W. d. (2014). Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:242661

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sharples, Alexander Gabriel William david. “Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:242661.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sharples, Alexander Gabriel William david. “Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight.” 2014. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sharples AGWd. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:242661.

Council of Science Editors:

Sharples AGWd. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:242661


University of Manchester

3. Sharples, Alexander Gabriel William david. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Manchester

The Great Australian Bight (GAB) is an extensive W-E striking continental margin basin that drifted northwards during the Cenozoic following rifting and separation from Antarctica in the mid/late Cretaceous. Seafloor spreading accelerated in the mid-Eocene and was associated with local volcanism. The mid-Eocene succession of the GAB is conspicuously mounded and separates a dominantly siliciclastic succession below from a fully marine carbonate succession above. The mounded succession was penecontemporaneous with major changes in global climate, oceanographic conditions and tectonic re-organization in the region, and thus may hold important clues as to the palaeo-environmental changes associated with these changes. The mid Eocene has so far only been described locally or in passing, usually by studies focused on either the siliciclastics below or the carbonates above. It was therefore chosen as a major focus point for the research project reported herein. Exploration activity in the GAB has been limited despite the presence of a working petroleum system and large target structures, but industry interest has increased over the past few years leading to 3D seismic surveys being acquired in the GAB. The focus for exploration is the Cretaceous succession beneath the relatively thin Cenozoic cover, which however, is still important in terms of shallow hazards and as overburden to the anticipated productive sections. As is often the case, the new 3D seismic data shows many overburden features in great detail and thus affords new insights to be gained that improve our understanding of the post-rift evolution of the marginThis thesis expands upon and reinterprets a pre-existing sequence framework in the Cenozoic GAB based from ODP Leg 182 results. A vast database of 2D and 3D seismic surveys has been integrated with exploration wells and borehole data and several surfaces have been calibrated to borehole and well constraints, then mapped to the maximum lateral extent across the available dataset. Surface mapping provided new insight into sequence deposition and palaeoenvironmental settings. Structure maps and thickness maps highlight key depocentre locations and trends over the Cenozoic GAB as well as stacked mass debris aprons. The newly discovered sequences raise new questions regarding trigger mechanisms in a-seismic areas and feed into industry geohazard perception models. The base surface of the Cenozoic framework hosts a plethora of mounded features across shelf and basinal section. All mounds within the dataset have been mapped. A set a bryozoan reef mounds have been interpreted lying parallel to the margin as linear complexes over 500 km. They coincide with the underlying siliciclastic delta clinoform breakpoints and provide insight into the changing palaeoenvironment at the 43 Ma mark, cessation of siliciclastics and regional marine transgression. Further mound mapping aided by 3D attribute extractions along the base Cenozoic unconformity led to the interpretation of a series of enigmatic igneous-based mounded…

Subjects/Keywords: 551.7; Great Australian Bight; Ceduna; Eyre; Southern Ocean; Bryozoans; Carbonate Reefs; Cool-water Carbonates

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sharples, A. G. W. d. (2014). Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/tectonostratigraphic-evolution-of-the-cenozoic-great-australian-bight(7025cc3d-1faa-4b0d-91d3-1bb514ee9237).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677736

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sharples, Alexander Gabriel William david. “Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/tectonostratigraphic-evolution-of-the-cenozoic-great-australian-bight(7025cc3d-1faa-4b0d-91d3-1bb514ee9237).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677736.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sharples, Alexander Gabriel William david. “Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight.” 2014. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sharples AGWd. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/tectonostratigraphic-evolution-of-the-cenozoic-great-australian-bight(7025cc3d-1faa-4b0d-91d3-1bb514ee9237).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677736.

Council of Science Editors:

Sharples AGWd. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Cenozoic Great Australian Bight. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. Available from: https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/tectonostratigraphic-evolution-of-the-cenozoic-great-australian-bight(7025cc3d-1faa-4b0d-91d3-1bb514ee9237).html ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677736

.