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You searched for subject:(Cedar Creek Watershed). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. McKinney, Erin N. Relative Contribution of Water Quality and Habitat to Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in Streams Influenced by Agricultural Land Use in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana.

Degree: 2012, IPFW

The objective of this study was to determine if water quality or instream habitat had a greater impact on aquatic macroinvertebrate communities. In order to investigate the complex interactions of water chemistry and stream habitat, macroinvertebrates were collected from local streams with a history of herbicide use as part of a larger ecological assessment study. Macroinvertebrate data were compared to a variety of stream parameters. Laboratory bioassays were also conducted with a Daphnia species (Daphnia magna) and an amphipod species (Hyallela azteca) using water from the same local streams. Macroinvertebrate community response variables were correlated, through linear regression, to both instream habitat and water quality variables. While several instream habitat quality variables were significantly correlated with one or more macroinvertebrate metrics, this was true for only two water quality variables. This would indicate that variation in stream habitat, more than water quality, determines the macroinvertebrate community compositions within the study area. Sites with relatively greater nitrate concentrations were correlated with more impaired macroinvertebrate communities. Water quality effects were observed in both Daphnia and amphipod bioassays. Decreased survival was observed in amphipods exposed to water from sites with higher atrazine, total pesticide, and nitrate concentrations, when compared to both the less contaminated site and the reference treatments. However, increased reproduction was observed in Daphnia in all spring (high-exposure) creek treatments, when compared to fall (low-exposure) and reference treatments. Results from ecological assessments and bioassays indicate that future conservation practices should focus on improving stream habitat quality and reducing nitrate, while maintaining current water quality improvement practices.

Subjects/Keywords: aquatic macroinvertebrates; Cedar Creek Watershed; Daphnia magna; Hyallela azteca; instream habitat; water quality effects; agricultural runoff effects; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Life Sciences; Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKinney, E. N. (2012). Relative Contribution of Water Quality and Habitat to Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in Streams Influenced by Agricultural Land Use in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana. (Masters Thesis). IPFW. Retrieved from http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/12

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKinney, Erin N. “Relative Contribution of Water Quality and Habitat to Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in Streams Influenced by Agricultural Land Use in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana.” 2012. Masters Thesis, IPFW. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/12.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKinney, Erin N. “Relative Contribution of Water Quality and Habitat to Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in Streams Influenced by Agricultural Land Use in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana.” 2012. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

McKinney EN. Relative Contribution of Water Quality and Habitat to Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in Streams Influenced by Agricultural Land Use in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. IPFW; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/12.

Council of Science Editors:

McKinney EN. Relative Contribution of Water Quality and Habitat to Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in Streams Influenced by Agricultural Land Use in the Cedar Creek Watershed, Indiana. [Masters Thesis]. IPFW; 2012. Available from: http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/12

2. Karki, Hasina. Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Fish Gut Collected from Selected Sites.

Degree: 2013, IPFW

Antibiotics and antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in the aquatic system around the world. We wanted to know whether the wild fish population from Cedar Creek watershed in Indiana and reference site in Michigan had any antibiotic resistant microbes in their gut samples. Additionally we wanted to test hatchery-raised fish for the same reason. The main objectives were to 1) isolate antibiotic resistant bacteria that might be present in the fish guts, 2) determine the antibiotic resistance phenotype of resistant isolates, and 3) to test for the presence of plasmids in selected resistant isolates. Freshwater field fish species were creek chubs (Semotilus atromaculatus) and mottled sculpins (Cottus bairdi), and hatchery-raised fish were tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Creek chubs and mottled sculpins were collected from 1) two tributaries of Cedar Creek- Matson Ditch and Swartz Ditch in Indiana that drain row-crop agricultural lands, and 2) a reference site in the East Branch of the St. Joseph River near Michigan that drains primarily forested land of the Lost Nation Game Reserve. Coho salmon and tilapia were obtained from hatcheries and maintained in a fish laboratory at IPFW. The antibiotic resistant bacteria from the fish gut were isolated on the basis of their resistance to ampicillin. Out of 70 fish included in this study 50 fish yielded antibiotic resistant isolates. From each fish except one, 5 bacterial colonies were isolated giving a total of 248 isolates. The results indicated prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the gut samples both in the field fish and in the hatchery-raised fish. The Matson Ditch fish had the highest percentage (94%) of ampicillin resistant bacteria among field sites that were sampled. Among two field fish species, creek chubs had more antibiotic resistant bacteria (85%) than mottled sculpin (67%). In case of hatchery-raised fish, 75% tilapia and 38% coho salmon had antibiotic resistant bacteria. All 248 bacterial isolates were further analyzed to determine their antibiotic resistance pattern by the Kirby Bauer method using six additional antibiotics -penicillin (pen), vancomycin(van), chloramphenicol (cap), tetracycline (tet), streptomycin (str) and gentamicin (gen). Since all isolates were Gram negative rods, the expected antibiotic resistance phenotype was caps, vanr, tets, strs, penr, gens. But many isolates showed multidrug resistance including resistance to vancomycin, tetracycline, and streptomycin. From 248, 34 bacterial isolates (28 from field fish and 6 from hatchery-raised fish) that deviated from expected phenotype were selected to test for the presence of plasmid. Only three bacterial isolates (one from field fish and two from hatchery-raised) were found to have plasmids. This data suggests that antibiotic resistance in vast majority of isolates is of chromosomal origin. After…

Subjects/Keywords: fresh water fish; antibiotic resistant bacteria; fish gut; hatchery-raised fish; Cedar Creek watershed; Creek chubs; mottled sculpins; tilapia; coho salmon; Bacteriology; Biology; Environmental Microbiology and Microbial Ecology; Life Sciences; Microbiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Karki, H. (2013). Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Fish Gut Collected from Selected Sites. (Masters Thesis). IPFW. Retrieved from http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/23

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Karki, Hasina. “Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Fish Gut Collected from Selected Sites.” 2013. Masters Thesis, IPFW. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/23.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Karki, Hasina. “Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Fish Gut Collected from Selected Sites.” 2013. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Karki H. Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Fish Gut Collected from Selected Sites. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. IPFW; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/23.

Council of Science Editors:

Karki H. Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Fish Gut Collected from Selected Sites. [Masters Thesis]. IPFW; 2013. Available from: http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/23

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