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You searched for subject:(Caste War). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. West, Ty Hill. Writing on the Run: Travel in Nineteenth-Century Mexico.

Degree: PhD, Spanish, 2014, Vanderbilt University

This dissertation questions the viability of nation-building in nineteenth-century Mexico through an analysis of travel writing, the circulation of documents, and the representation of subjects in transit. I study a wide variety of texts (diaries, chronicles, calendars, travel accounts, novels, images, and letters) to analyze nation-building through its discontents. My study combines the discursive construction of transatlantic and transcultural threats to national identity, such as the French Intervention, the Mexican-American War, and the indigenous Caste War, with the contradictory role of the press that both represented an “imagined community” and propagated the representation of what threatened such a community. I focus on what I call writing on the run: writing on the run (texts produced while on the road), and writing on the run (writers writing about travel and the circulation of ideas). Through this mode of inquiry, I conclude that nineteenth-century writers and the media where their texts were published employed notions of travel to discuss the advantages and threats of the circulation of ideas to liberal and conservative thought, often showing how their circulation took these ideas well beyond their original thought and put into question the notion of an imagined community. Advisors/Committee Members: Cathy L. Jrade (committee member), Earl Fitz (committee member), Edward Wright-Rios (committee member), Benigno Trigo (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: masculinity; censorship; exile; conservatism; liberalism; print culture; Mexico; travel writing; nation-building; Caste War; French Intervention

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APA (6th Edition):

West, T. H. (2014). Writing on the Run: Travel in Nineteenth-Century Mexico. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14547

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

West, Ty Hill. “Writing on the Run: Travel in Nineteenth-Century Mexico.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14547.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

West, Ty Hill. “Writing on the Run: Travel in Nineteenth-Century Mexico.” 2014. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

West TH. Writing on the Run: Travel in Nineteenth-Century Mexico. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14547.

Council of Science Editors:

West TH. Writing on the Run: Travel in Nineteenth-Century Mexico. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14547


University of Pennsylvania

2. Cain, Tiffany Cherelle. Materializing Political Violence: Segregation, War, And Memory In Quintana Roo, Mexico.

Degree: 2019, University of Pennsylvania

How does political violence materialize across timescales in settler colonial contexts? This central question of my dissertation responds to what I see as a growing divide between war studies and everyday life studies in the humanities and social sciences. This divide has special influence in studies of colonialism writ large, and colonial violence in particular, because it can render indigenous peoples' experiences with and engagements in colonial projects unintelligible. In order to remedy this shortcoming, I present a framework for an archaeology of political violence, defined not as a synonym for war, but as the function of war and structural oppression. The framework I propose emerges from my involvement with a collaborative heritage initiative, the Tihosuco Heritage Preservation and Community Development Project, located in Tihosuco, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The project positioned me to draw on a wide range of media with which to think about the politics surrounding the history of the Caste War of Yucatan—a predominantly Maya anti-colonial insurrection that began in the former Tihosuco Parish in 1847. The war lasted until 1901, making it one of the longest (as well as most successful) indigenous insurrections to have been mounted in the Americas. Each of the three central chapters contends with one mode of materializing political violence: segregation, war, and memory practices. Ultimately, the aim is to arrive at a more holistic approach to investigating violence—and its ramifications—in settler colonial contexts.

Subjects/Keywords: Caste War; Maya; Memory; Segregation; War; Yucatan; History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology; Latin American Languages and Societies; Latin American Studies; Social and Cultural Anthropology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cain, T. C. (2019). Materializing Political Violence: Segregation, War, And Memory In Quintana Roo, Mexico. (Thesis). University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved from https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3289

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cain, Tiffany Cherelle. “Materializing Political Violence: Segregation, War, And Memory In Quintana Roo, Mexico.” 2019. Thesis, University of Pennsylvania. Accessed April 22, 2021. https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3289.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cain, Tiffany Cherelle. “Materializing Political Violence: Segregation, War, And Memory In Quintana Roo, Mexico.” 2019. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Cain TC. Materializing Political Violence: Segregation, War, And Memory In Quintana Roo, Mexico. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Pennsylvania; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3289.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cain TC. Materializing Political Violence: Segregation, War, And Memory In Quintana Roo, Mexico. [Thesis]. University of Pennsylvania; 2019. Available from: https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3289

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. O'Connor, Amber Marie. Consuming the Maya : an ethnography of eating and being in the land of the Caste Wars.

Degree: PhD, Anthropology, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

This dissertation is an ethnographic work describing how foodways have become central to identity negotiation in a Maya village that has recently been impacted by evangelical conversion and tourism. This village is in the region of Quintana Roo, Mexico best known for its involvement in the Caste Wars of Yucatán and historic resistance to assimilation to Mexican identity. However, in recent years, the demand for inexpensive labor in the hotel zone of the Caribbean coast of Quintana Roo has led to improved infrastructure and transportation to these villages. With this improved infrastructure has come increased outside interaction including the establishment of evangelical churches and day labor buses. These combined influences of religion and labor changes have led to new ways of negotiating identity that had not previously existed in village life here. Because life in this village had always centered on subsistence farming and its associated food getting and food making tasks, the option for wage labor and evangelical religion have provided a support system for those unable or unwilling to participate in traditional forms of subsistence. The new social structures are often negotiated using food and foodways as a declaration of belonging or resistance. My work provides vignettes describing these processes of identity negotiation at the national, regional and familial levels. Advisors/Committee Members: Stross, Brian (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Foodways; Yucatec Maya; Caste War; Gremio; Syncretism; Tortilla; Wage labor

…tradition in the heart of the Caste War region of Quintana Roo. In addition foodways allow for an… …dictating what makes up being ‘puro Maya9’ or the true, pure Maya of the Caste War. Because this… …smoothly. 10 People in the Señor/Xcacal villages claim the Caste War wasn’t over until about 35… …the sacred pueblos remaining from the Caste War. Señor began as a suburb of Xcacal. For a… …detailed history of the Caste War please see Reed (2002), Rugeley (2001)… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

O'Connor, A. M. (2014). Consuming the Maya : an ethnography of eating and being in the land of the Caste Wars. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24902

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Connor, Amber Marie. “Consuming the Maya : an ethnography of eating and being in the land of the Caste Wars.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24902.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Connor, Amber Marie. “Consuming the Maya : an ethnography of eating and being in the land of the Caste Wars.” 2014. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

O'Connor AM. Consuming the Maya : an ethnography of eating and being in the land of the Caste Wars. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24902.

Council of Science Editors:

O'Connor AM. Consuming the Maya : an ethnography of eating and being in the land of the Caste Wars. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24902

.