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You searched for subject:(Capture Release). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Central Florida

1. Rehman, Zia. How Many Are Out There? A Novel Approach For Open and Closed Systems.

Degree: 2014, University of Central Florida

We propose a ratio estimator to determine population estimates using capture-recapture sampling. It's different than traditional approaches in the following ways: (1) Ordering of recaptures: Currently data sets do not take into account the "ordering" of the recaptures, although this crucial information is available to them at no cost. (2) Dependence of trials and cluster sampling: Our model explicitly considers trials to be dependent and improves existing literature which assumes independence. (3) Rate of convergence: The percentage sampled has an inverse relationship with population size, for a chosen degree of accuracy. (4) Asymptotic Attainment of Minimum Variance (Open Systems: (=population variance). (5) Full use of data and model applicability (6) Non-parametric (7) Heterogeneity: When units being sampled are hard to identify. (8) Open and closed systems: Simpler results are presented separately for closed systems. (9) Robustness to assumptions in open systems Advisors/Committee Members: Kincaid, J. Peter.

Subjects/Keywords: Capture recapture; sampling; ecology; healthcare; mark release; Statistics and Probability; Dissertations, Academic  – Sciences; Sciences  – Dissertations, Academic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rehman, Z. (2014). How Many Are Out There? A Novel Approach For Open and Closed Systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Central Florida. Retrieved from https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4569

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rehman, Zia. “How Many Are Out There? A Novel Approach For Open and Closed Systems.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Central Florida. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4569.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rehman, Zia. “How Many Are Out There? A Novel Approach For Open and Closed Systems.” 2014. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Rehman Z. How Many Are Out There? A Novel Approach For Open and Closed Systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4569.

Council of Science Editors:

Rehman Z. How Many Are Out There? A Novel Approach For Open and Closed Systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2014. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4569


University of Florida

2. Hrycyshyn, Gabrielle E. Survival Probabilities and Density of Four Sympatric Species of Freshwater Turtles in Florida.

Degree: MS, Interdisciplinary Ecology, 2007, University of Florida

Turtles are important, and often neglected, components of their ecosystems, and many turtle species are endangered. I studied four species of common freshwater turtles over a five year period in Wekiwa Springs State Park (WSSP), Apopka, Florida. These four turtle species were the Peninsula Cooter (Pseudemys peninsularis), Florida Red-bellied Cooter (P. nelsoni), Loggerhead Musk Turtle (Sternotherus minor minor) and Stinkpot (S. odoratus). For each species I estimated annual recapture probabilities, population density, biomass, annual survival probabilities and realized population growth rate using capture-mark-recapture data from March 2000 to November 2005. My density estimates showed significant declines throughout the study for both Pseudemys species, and non-significant increases in density for both Sternotherus species. These findings are not directly corroborated by the estimated realized population growth rates, which suggest that P. peninsularis populations are increasing non-significantly, and P. nelsoni populations are declining non-significantly. I postulate that the apparent disagreement between the realized population growth rate and density estimates arises from the need to account for temporal variability in estimates of realized population growth rate. Overall my findings suggest that none of these turtle species are in danger, and the apparent declines in both Pseudemys species appear to stabilize toward the end of the study. There are numerous environmental factors that could impact the future health of the spring ecosystem and these turtle populations. These include invasion by the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, which necessitates management activities that many disturb the turtles, increased nitrate pollution and increased water usage and therefore decreased spring output. I recommend monitoring of these turtle populations to ensure that should population declines occur appropriate management actions can be taken. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Bjorndal, Karen (committee chair), Bolten, Alan B. (committee member), Bolker, Benjamin M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomass; Density estimation; Female animals; Geometric mean; Lagoons; Population estimates; Population growth rate; Sex ratio; Species; Turtles; 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, abundance, aic, akaike, apalone, apopka, apparent, barrier, bellied, belly, biomass, capture, carapace, chelydra, chicken, chrysea, cjs, cmr, common, cooter, cooters, cormack, criterion, decrease, deirochelys, demographic, density, eared, elegans, emigrating, emigration, emmigrating, emmigration, emydid, eutrophication, female, ferox, fertilizer, fit, florida, floridana, fluctuation, freshwater, geometric, goodness, growth, hydrilla, immigrating, immigration, increase, information, invasive, inverse, iteroparous, jolly, kinosternid, lambda, late, loggerhead, male, mark, mass, maturity, mean, migrating, migration, minor, model, musk, nelsoni, nitrate, odoratus, osceola, overdispersion, park, peninsula, peninsularis, plastron, pollution, population, pradel, program, pseudemys, qaic, rainbow, rate, ratio, realized, recapture, red, redbellied, redbelly, regression, release, reticularia, reverse, robust, rock, rsrsp, run, scripta, seber, septic, serpentina, sex, sexual, shell, silt, silting, slider, sliders, snapping, softshell, spring, springs, state, sternotherus, stinkpot, survival, survive, sympatric, tank, temporal, time, trachemys, turbidity, turtle, turtles, variance, verticillata, weed, weighted, wekiva, wekiwa, wssp; Wekiwa Springs State Park ( local )

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hrycyshyn, G. E. (2007). Survival Probabilities and Density of Four Sympatric Species of Freshwater Turtles in Florida. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021036

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hrycyshyn, Gabrielle E. “Survival Probabilities and Density of Four Sympatric Species of Freshwater Turtles in Florida.” 2007. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021036.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hrycyshyn, Gabrielle E. “Survival Probabilities and Density of Four Sympatric Species of Freshwater Turtles in Florida.” 2007. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hrycyshyn GE. Survival Probabilities and Density of Four Sympatric Species of Freshwater Turtles in Florida. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021036.

Council of Science Editors:

Hrycyshyn GE. Survival Probabilities and Density of Four Sympatric Species of Freshwater Turtles in Florida. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2007. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0021036

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