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You searched for subject:(Capillary Channeled Polymer). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Burdette, Carolyn. SAMPLE PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ANALYTICAL MEASUREMENTS: CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS EMPLOYED IN PROTEIN SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION APPLICATIONS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2012, Clemson University

The task of sample preparation encompasses many challenges and demands for analytical techniques. Appropriate preparative steps can be the determining factor between successful measurements and failures. Too little preparation can lead to the inability to detect analytes due to low concentrations, insufficient extraction of analytes, and/or strong matrix effects; exhaustive preparation steps increases analysis times, the potential for analyte losses, and the difficulty to obtain consistent reproducible results. Discussed here are several examples of analytical techniques where sample preparation is critical and can be used to improve existing techniques. Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers used for solid phase extraction (SPE) protein analysis techniques is described first. The C-CP fibers have several advantageous attributes stemming from the unique shape, wide chemical and pH stability ranges, predictable surface interactions, and overall low material costs. The fibers have been employed in micropipette tip and microcolumn SPE formats for the desalting of proteins from high salt content buffer, synthetic urine and synthetic saliva matrices. Micropipette tips were prepared and used for an off-line method prior to UV-VIS detection, and a microcolumn format was developed as an on-line SPE technique for ESI-MS detection. The characterization of isoflavones present in soy, kudzu, and red clover products by liquid chromatography-particle beam electron ionization mass spectrometry (LC-PB/EIMS) is also described. Here, NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) were extracted using 80% methanol without a hydrolysis step. Samples were then analyzed using a chromatographic separation and analytes quantified by an internal standard (IS) method using 7-hydroxy-4-chromone as the IS compound. The particle beam allows for simple interfacing between LC separations and EIMS detection, giving ability to attain qualitative and quantitative information simultaneously. Isoflavones were quantified and compared to NIST certified values. Advisors/Committee Members: Marcus, Richard K, Christensen , Kenneth, Chumanov , George, Dominy , Brian.

Subjects/Keywords: Capillary Channeled Polymer; Mass Spectrometry; Particle Beam; Sample Preparation; Solid Phase Extraction; Analytical Chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burdette, C. (2012). SAMPLE PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ANALYTICAL MEASUREMENTS: CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS EMPLOYED IN PROTEIN SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION APPLICATIONS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1048

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burdette, Carolyn. “SAMPLE PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ANALYTICAL MEASUREMENTS: CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS EMPLOYED IN PROTEIN SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION APPLICATIONS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1048.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burdette, Carolyn. “SAMPLE PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ANALYTICAL MEASUREMENTS: CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS EMPLOYED IN PROTEIN SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION APPLICATIONS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS.” 2012. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Burdette C. SAMPLE PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ANALYTICAL MEASUREMENTS: CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS EMPLOYED IN PROTEIN SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION APPLICATIONS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1048.

Council of Science Editors:

Burdette C. SAMPLE PREPARATION TECHNIQUES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ANALYTICAL MEASUREMENTS: CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS EMPLOYED IN PROTEIN SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION APPLICATIONS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN BOTANICAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2012. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1048


Clemson University

2. Pittman, Jennifer. SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER (C-CP) FIBERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN HIGHLY SELECTIVE SEPARATIONS.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2012, Clemson University

High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is a key component in the purification and separation of biological samples. Stationary phases in HPLC are generally silica based porous particles or monoliths designed with high surface area and high capacities in mind. However, in the field of macromolecule separations, specifically proteins, the porous based stationary phases have inherent issues that include slow mass transfer, high operating back pressures, and analyte carryover. Recent research has looked to non-porous polymeric materials as stationary phases in HPLC to overcome these challenges. Specifically, fibrous based polymer stationary phases exhibit significant benefits for macromolecules that include improved mass transfer, decreased operating pressures, and improved chemical robustness. Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) fibers have been under investigation in the Marcus laboratory for their application as stationary phases in HPLC. C-CP fibers are extruded from standard textile polymers through a spinneret. The spinneret shape provides the unique structure of the fibers, which consists of eight channels that run the length of the fiber. These C-CP fibers have been successfully employed for macromolecule separations due to the increased surface area over cylindrical fibers, an improved mass transfer due to their non-porous nature, and reduced back pressures allowing for operation at higher linear velocities. C-CP fibers come in a variety of base polymers; polyester, polypropylene, and nylon, providing a wide array of chemical interactions (ionic, pi-pi, hydrophobic) and therefore separation mechanisms to occur. However, the ability to generate HPLC stationary phase surfaces with a high degree of analyte specificity is desired. The focus of this research is on modification of C-CP fibers, specifically to generate a high density functional group surface for analyte selective interactions. All three available base polymers of C-CP fibers were evaluated for their ability to undergo chemical modification while maintaining the structural integrity and characteristics of the fibers. Several modification approaches, including plasma grafting, covalent modification, and lipid adsorption, were utilized and their performance evaluated in order to obtain metal or protein selective HPLC stationary phases. Advisors/Committee Members: Marcus, R. Kenneth, Christensen , Kenneth A, Chumanov , George, Pennington , William T.

Subjects/Keywords: Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) Fibers; High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC); Polymer Stationary Phases; Selective Separations; Solid Phase Extraction (SPE); Surface Modifications; Analytical Chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pittman, J. (2012). SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER (C-CP) FIBERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN HIGHLY SELECTIVE SEPARATIONS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/919

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pittman, Jennifer. “SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER (C-CP) FIBERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN HIGHLY SELECTIVE SEPARATIONS.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/919.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pittman, Jennifer. “SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER (C-CP) FIBERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN HIGHLY SELECTIVE SEPARATIONS.” 2012. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Pittman J. SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER (C-CP) FIBERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN HIGHLY SELECTIVE SEPARATIONS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/919.

Council of Science Editors:

Pittman J. SURFACE MODIFICATIONS OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER (C-CP) FIBERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN HIGHLY SELECTIVE SEPARATIONS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2012. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/919


Clemson University

3. Nelson, Dwella. CHARACTERIZATION OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS AS STATIONARY PHASES FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MACROMOLECULES.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2006, Clemson University

Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are being developed and characterized as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) stationary phases for reversed-phase separations of proteins. Conventional porous phases are not well suited for separating large macromolecules due to the slow diffusivity of the molecules, large diffusional distances, and stagnant mobile phase zones within the column. Stationary phases are continually being developed to address the challenges associated with HPLC of proteins and other macromolecules in general. C-CP fiber stationary phases are an alternative to conventional bead technology and offer a variety of chemical and physical advantages. The fibers can be selected for their chemical functionality (e.g., polypropylene, polyester, nylon) and are stable over a wide range of pH. They are non-porous, which addresses the mass transfer limitations encountered in macromolecular separations performed on porous media. Fibers within the columns interdigitate to form continuous rod-like structures that are similar to monoliths. Flow rates up to 9 mL/min can be used on conventional LC systems with minimal system backpressures, which is indicative of efficient mass transport through the column bed with minimal obstructions to fluid flow. When compared to conventional columns of the same dimensions, C-CP fiber columns exhibit 70 % lower system backpressures over a range of flow rates. Novel reversed-phase (RP) chromatographic methods using polypropylene (PP) and poly (ethylene-terephthalate) PET fiber columns have been developed, optimized, and compared to a conventional packed-bed column used in macromolecule separations. The reproducibility of the packing procedure and column efficiency were determined by chromatographic characterization, i.e., retention times, selectivity, elution order, resolution, peak shapes, peak areas, and peak widths. Overall, the PET fiber phase was best suited for protein separations when compared to the PP fiber type. Protein adsorption on surfaces is an affinity related process (kinetic process), so breakthrough analysis was used to evaluate the adsorption kinetics of the adsorbate-adsorbent system (protein-C-CP fiber). The breakthrough curve data were analyzed to determine the applicability and limitations of this technology for preparative and rapid protein separations. The steep, uniform frontal profiles of the breakthrough curves are indicative of systems with favorable mass transfer kinetics. The protein adsorption characteristics of C-CP fibers evaluated in these studies were similar to what has been reported for other stationary phases being used in rapid separations of proteins. These fundamental studies and the corresponding results presented here support the use of C-CP fibers as HPLC stationary phases for macromolecule separations and adsorption studies. Advisors/Committee Members: MARCUS, RICHARD K.

Subjects/Keywords: Stationary Phases; Macromolecules; Proteins; Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fibers; Protein Adsorption; Analytical Chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nelson, D. (2006). CHARACTERIZATION OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS AS STATIONARY PHASES FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MACROMOLECULES. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/31

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nelson, Dwella. “CHARACTERIZATION OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS AS STATIONARY PHASES FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MACROMOLECULES.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed June 25, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/31.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nelson, Dwella. “CHARACTERIZATION OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS AS STATIONARY PHASES FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MACROMOLECULES.” 2006. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Nelson D. CHARACTERIZATION OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS AS STATIONARY PHASES FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MACROMOLECULES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2006. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/31.

Council of Science Editors:

Nelson D. CHARACTERIZATION OF CAPILLARY-CHANNELED POLYMER FIBERS AS STATIONARY PHASES FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MACROMOLECULES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2006. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/31

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