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You searched for subject:(Canadian Arctic archaeology). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Western Ontario

1. Moody, John F. Petrographic Analysis of Inuit Ceramics.

Degree: 2018, University of Western Ontario

This dissertation investigates the manufacture and use of Inuit ceramics through ceramic petrography. It uses an approach that expands traditional ceramic petrographic descriptive methodologies to more fully document characteristics related to organic inclusions. Changes focus on the description of voids, organic inclusions, and estimation of the amount of organic material in pastes. Organic inclusions were an important component of Inuit ceramic traditions. This methodology allows us to not only identify the types of organics used in archaeological specimens, but also quantitatively and qualitatively assess them alongside other components of the ceramic paste to build a more complete picture of ceramic production. Unsintered ceramics were found in archaeological assemblages from across the Canadian Arctic and are well-documented in the historic record of early Inuit-European contact in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. These objects have diverse morphologies, raw material ingredients, and a heterogeneous abundance which varies geographically. All of the unsintered ceramics documented in the archaeological collections are lamps, some of which were made from composites of other materials. Patterns in technological choices reveal a preference for organic tempering agents over inorganic and the use of poor-quality clays. These patterns indicate that unsintered and fired ceramics fulfilled different roles. The technological choices Inuit potters made when manufacturing unsintered ceramics indicate they were made expediently and reflect the importance of lamps within Inuit cultures. Ceramics from three early Thule Inuit sites in the Western Canadian Arctic show similarities in technological practice and the use of a range of local raw material sources. The universal use of local raw materials at these sites has implications for our understanding of the Thule Inuit migration into the Canadian Arctic. These sites were not occupied by a founding population who brought non-local ceramics with them. Commonalities in the manufacture of ceramics, including the use of rounded sand to-granule sized tempers and organic tempering agents, demonstrate the flexibility of this ceramic tradition and the ability of recently arrived groups to adapt them to new landscapes.

Subjects/Keywords: Arctic archaeology; Inuit; Thule Inuit; Canadian Arctic; ceramic petrography; Archaeological Anthropology

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APA (6th Edition):

Moody, J. F. (2018). Petrographic Analysis of Inuit Ceramics. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5849

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moody, John F. “Petrographic Analysis of Inuit Ceramics.” 2018. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed January 20, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5849.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moody, John F. “Petrographic Analysis of Inuit Ceramics.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Moody JF. Petrographic Analysis of Inuit Ceramics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5849.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Moody JF. Petrographic Analysis of Inuit Ceramics. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2018. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5849

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Western Ontario

2. Munizzi, Jordon S. Rethinking Holocene Ecological Relationships Among Caribou, Muskoxen, and Human Hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada: A Stable Isotope Approach.

Degree: 2017, University of Western Ontario

This dissertation explores the ecology of caribou (Rangifer tarandus spp.) and muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and its relevance to human hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada, over the last 4000 years, primarily through the isotopic analysis of modern and archaeological faunal remains. First, we establish baseline carbon and nitrogen isotope relationships between modern vegetation and caribou and muskox bone collagen using Bayesian mixing models. The models indicate that dwarf shrub (Salix arctica) does not contribute significantly to bone collagen isotopic compositions in either species, while sedges and yellow lichen (Cetraria tilesii) do. These findings are ecologically significant considering that shrub phytomass is expected to increase across the Circumpolar Arctic, while lichen phytomass is expected to decrease. Second, we investigate the hypothesis that niche competition caused periodic declines in the caribou and muskox populations over the last 4000 years, using archaeological bone collagen δ13C and δ15N. After accounting for the possibility of different trophic discrimination factors in both species, the isotopic data suggest that caribou and muskoxen typically occupy the same niche, but tend towards niche expansion during cold or climatically-unstable periods. Third, we evaluate the potential of reconstructing seasonal movements and migrations in caribou and muskoxen by sequential measurements of tooth enamel δ18O on the micrometer-scale. We conclude that seasonal variation in precipitation δ18O obscures geographic variation in δ18O in these tooth enamel samples. The intra-tooth patterns in δ18O are useful as paleoenvironmental proxies as they reflect changes in seasonality across time.

Subjects/Keywords: Caribou; muskox; Banks Island; Canadian Arctic archaeology; isotopic baselines; zooarchaeology; isotopic niche; ecology; arctic herbivore ecology; Archaeological Anthropology; Biogeochemistry; Biological and Physical Anthropology; Natural Resources and Conservation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Munizzi, J. S. (2017). Rethinking Holocene Ecological Relationships Among Caribou, Muskoxen, and Human Hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada: A Stable Isotope Approach. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5089

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Munizzi, Jordon S. “Rethinking Holocene Ecological Relationships Among Caribou, Muskoxen, and Human Hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada: A Stable Isotope Approach.” 2017. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed January 20, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5089.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Munizzi, Jordon S. “Rethinking Holocene Ecological Relationships Among Caribou, Muskoxen, and Human Hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada: A Stable Isotope Approach.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Munizzi JS. Rethinking Holocene Ecological Relationships Among Caribou, Muskoxen, and Human Hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada: A Stable Isotope Approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5089.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Munizzi JS. Rethinking Holocene Ecological Relationships Among Caribou, Muskoxen, and Human Hunters on Banks Island, NWT, Canada: A Stable Isotope Approach. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2017. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5089

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Alberta

3. Will, Richard T. Nineteenth century Copper Inuit subsistence practices on Banks Island, N.W.T.

Degree: PhD, Department of Anthropology, 1985, University of Alberta

Doctoral thesis which adopts an approach designed by Binford to examine how muskoxen were exploited by the Copper Inuit who lived on northern Banks Island during the nineteenth century. A set of food value indices are developed for muskox anatomical parts, which are used to predict how the carcasses of these animals were exploited at three archaeological sites.

Subjects/Keywords: Inuit – Northwest Territories – Banks Island.; Archaeology; Precontact; Muskoxen; Inuit – Northwest Territories – Antiquities.; Eskimo Prehistory; Banks Island (N.W.T.) – History.; Artifacts; Banks Island; Inuit, Customs; Eskimos, Customs; Muskox – Northwest Territories – Banks Island.; Indian Prehistory; Inuit – Northwest Territories – Food.; Northern Canada; Antiquities; Inuit Prehistory; Canada, North of 60; Canadian Arctic

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Will, R. T. (1985). Nineteenth century Copper Inuit subsistence practices on Banks Island, N.W.T. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alberta. Retrieved from https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/08612q27d

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Will, Richard T. “Nineteenth century Copper Inuit subsistence practices on Banks Island, N.W.T.” 1985. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alberta. Accessed January 20, 2020. https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/08612q27d.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Will, Richard T. “Nineteenth century Copper Inuit subsistence practices on Banks Island, N.W.T.” 1985. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Will RT. Nineteenth century Copper Inuit subsistence practices on Banks Island, N.W.T. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alberta; 1985. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/08612q27d.

Council of Science Editors:

Will RT. Nineteenth century Copper Inuit subsistence practices on Banks Island, N.W.T. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alberta; 1985. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/08612q27d

.