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You searched for subject:(Canada Health Act). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Hammell, Lance H-W 1988-. Health Care and Federal-Provincial Relations: Charting a New Course Into The 21st Century.

Degree: 2018, University of Saskatchewan

Universal publicly-administered pre-paid health insurance, commonly known as public health care or Medicare, is easily Canada’s single most high-profile public policy. Yet very few Canadians understand exactly what the Medicare program is, how it is structured, and how it works. Even fewer are aware that federal provincial intergovernmental relations is the crux upon which the entire Medicare program rests, with all the significant attendant implications of that reality for the day-to-day lives of millions of Canadians. The purpose of this thesis is to explain how Medicare is structured in Canada, distill the complex and continually raging debate surrounding this topic into comprehensible, clearly articulated worldviews, and expose those worldviews to scholarly analysis. The thesis concludes with recommendations for the future direction of the Medicare program based upon its findings and analysis. To this end, this thesis examines the developmental trajectory of Medicare in Canada with a particular emphasis on federal-provincial fiscal relations and their impact on the program. The debate over the best way to structure and operate Medicare is distilled into two distinct schools of thought: the ‘centralist’ and the ‘decentralist.’ The positions of each school are exposed to a comparative qualitative analysis of their contrasting proposals for federal-provincial relations in the health care field. The thesis concludes that the ‘centralist’ school of thought is the superior of the two proposals and should be implemented given that it provides a blueprint for meaningful reform and expansion of the Medicare program while avoiding various pitfalls which are associated with the ‘decentralist’ approach. Further, it is asserted that federal engagement and leadership has been essential to the inception and maintenance of Medicare up to the present and will be central to the maintenance, reform, and expansion of Medicare moving into the future. Advisors/Committee Members: Romanow, Roy, Michelmann, Hans, Garcea, Joe, Hibbert, Neil, Béland, Daniel.

Subjects/Keywords: Medicare; health care; federalism; decentralisation; open federalism; shared-cost programs; Canada Health Act

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hammell, L. H. 1. (2018). Health Care and Federal-Provincial Relations: Charting a New Course Into The 21st Century. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/10729

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hammell, Lance H-W 1988-. “Health Care and Federal-Provincial Relations: Charting a New Course Into The 21st Century.” 2018. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/10729.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hammell, Lance H-W 1988-. “Health Care and Federal-Provincial Relations: Charting a New Course Into The 21st Century.” 2018. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hammell LH1. Health Care and Federal-Provincial Relations: Charting a New Course Into The 21st Century. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/10729.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hammell LH1. Health Care and Federal-Provincial Relations: Charting a New Course Into The 21st Century. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/10729

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Victoria

2. Tomasson, Kimberley. Ethical consistency, the Canada Health Act and resource allocation : arguments for a rights-based approach to decision-making.

Degree: Dept. of Philosophy, 2008, University of Victoria

The purpose of this work is to show the importance of ethical consistency and its application in the decision-making process when allocating health care resources with respect to the Canada Health Act. Based on the specific decisions in its history and the development of its principles, I suggest that the Act can be interpreted as indicating a particular moral basis and that this could have an influence on how resources are allocated. I will focus on three claims supporting the argument that services can be delivered in a consistent and methodical manner that respects this particular moral foundation. First, the outcomes of decisions justified by simultaneous use of logically incompatible and distinct moral theories are problematic. I suggest that an approach to reasoning that uses one type of moral theory throughout the decision-making process results in less ambiguous outcomes. Second, based on key points in the history of the Canada Health Act, I believe there is a moral theory, deontological in nature, and that it captures the spirit behind the Act's development and current formulation. Third, decision-makers in Canada should follow one deontological theory when allocating health care resources to avoid inconsistencies, and to work within the moral framework of the Act as I have interpreted it. A delivery system that consistently follows this procedure may have different outcomes than the current methods of macro-allocation, and these differences may have effects on the amount and availability of health care services. Advisors/Committee Members: Kluge, Eike-Henner W. (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Canada  – Canada Health Act; Medical policy  – Canada; Medical policy  – Moral and ethical aspects

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tomasson, K. (2008). Ethical consistency, the Canada Health Act and resource allocation : arguments for a rights-based approach to decision-making. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/703

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tomasson, Kimberley. “Ethical consistency, the Canada Health Act and resource allocation : arguments for a rights-based approach to decision-making.” 2008. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/703.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tomasson, Kimberley. “Ethical consistency, the Canada Health Act and resource allocation : arguments for a rights-based approach to decision-making.” 2008. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Tomasson K. Ethical consistency, the Canada Health Act and resource allocation : arguments for a rights-based approach to decision-making. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2008. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/703.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tomasson K. Ethical consistency, the Canada Health Act and resource allocation : arguments for a rights-based approach to decision-making. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/703

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. MacLeod, Suzanne. From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times.

Degree: School of Social Work, 2014, University of Victoria

As a social worker practising in long-term residential care for people living with dementia, I am alarmed by discourses in the media and health policy that construct persons living with dementia and their health care needs as a threatening “rising tide” or crisis. I am particularly concerned about the material effects such dominant discourses, and the values they uphold, might have on the collective provision of care and support for our elderly citizens in the present neoliberal economic and political context of health care. To better understand how dominant discourses about dementia work at this time when Canada’s population is aging and the number of persons living with dementia is anticipated to increase, I have rooted my thesis in poststructural methodology. My research method is a discourse analysis, which draws on Foucault’s archaeological and genealogical concepts, to examine two contemporary health policy documents related to dementia care – one national and one provincial. I also incorporate some poetic representation – or found poetry – to write up my findings. While deconstructing and disrupting taken for granted dominant crisis discourses on dementia in health policy, my research also makes space for alternative constructions to support discursive and health policy possibilities in solidarity with persons living with dementia so that they may thrive. Advisors/Committee Members: (advisor), Strega, Susan (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: social determinants of health; social exclusion; crisis discourse; Alzheimer's; Alzheimer Society of Canada; Suzanne MacLeod; Susan Strega; Donna Jeffery; poststructural; poststructuralism; admission to long-term care; funding for long-term care; Improving BC's care for persons with dementia in emergency departments and acute care hospitals Findings and Recommendations; acute care; aging demographic; BC Psychogeriatric Association; biomedical; British Columbia; Canada Health Act; collective social responsibility; competition; corporate profit; corporatization; deresponsibilization; elder friendly; elderly citizens; family caregivers; Foucault; found poetry; genealogy of power knowledge; incompetent; Ministry of Health; moral economics; pharmaceutical; bed blocker; stigmatized; tsunami; absent-person; action plan; aging population; alternative discourse; apocalyptic demography; appropriate; archaeology; archaeology of knowledge; archaeological; British Columbia; burden; Canada; caregiver; charity; charitable; collective; collective car; community; community care; condition of possibility; conditions of possibility; corporate; counter-discourse; dementia; dementia care; dementia policy; dementia social policy; dependent; depoliticize; discourse; discourse analysis; disruptive discourse; economic burden; economics; economy; elder; emergency; epidemic; exclusion; fear-monger; Foucauldian; found poem; genealogy; genealogical; health authority; health care; health care staff; health care system; health policy document; healthy lifestyle; home and community care; homogenization; homogenize; hospital; imaginaries; imaginary; incapable; individual responsibility; individualism; knowledge; long-term care; material effect; materiality of discourse; media; moral panic; national strategy; neoliberal; neoliberalism; neoliberal rationality; not prepared; object; objectification; other; person-centered; people living with dementia; person living with dementia; persons living with dementia; person with dementia; poem; poetic representation; poetry; policy; policies; political; politics; power; power knowledge; power relations; private; privatize; privatization; productivity of dominant discourse; public health care; residential care; resistance; responsibility; responsibilization; rising tide; Rising Tide The impact of Dementia on Canadian Society; safety net; shift costs to caregivers; responsibility; social policy imaginary; social well-being; social work; social worker; solidarity; specialized; stakeholder; state; stigma; subject matter expert; taxpayer; threat; unprepared; unproductive; voluntary; volunteer; wait time; wave; social policy

…clearly protected under the Canada Health Act (p. 322). Actually, as Cohen, Tate, and… …the neoliberal context of health care in Canada. That said, however, I also examine how they… …disruptive dementia discourses; systems of health care delivery; and neoliberal politics in Canada… …Canada has a predominantly publicly funded and administered health care system at least with… …services” (Health Canada, 2011, p. 1). This means citizens “have the right to care… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

MacLeod, S. (2014). From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

MacLeod, Suzanne. “From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

MacLeod, Suzanne. “From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times.” 2014. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

MacLeod S. From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213.

Council of Science Editors:

MacLeod S. From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213

.