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You searched for subject:(Camp site). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Cahill, Nathalie. The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan.

Degree: 2012, University of Saskatchewan

The Camp Rayner site (EgNr-2) is a multicomponent site located approximately 135km south of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and is situated along the northern shoreline of Lake Diefenbaker and the western shoreline of Hitchcock Bay. The Saskatchewan Archaeological Society conducted field school excavations at Camp Rayner between the years of 1987 and 1995 as part of a salvage/rescue program for reasons of potential heritage displacement and site destruction. In total, 53 1x1m2 units were opened and revealed 7 occupation levels that span the Terminal Late Paleoindian to the Late Precontact period. Two radiocarbon dates were obtained which corroborates with both the Terminal Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period. Research included an analysis of the entire cultural assemblage to reconstruct the cultural sequence of the site. This site offers a unique opportunity to study a number of archaeological cultures on the Northern Plains. The presence of an in situ Terminal Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period occupation with correlating radiocarbon dates are of considerable significance due to their rarity on the northern grasslands. The recovery of Sandy Creek points and other Late Middle Period projectile points are also regarded as especially significant due to an increase in cultural complexity during the Late Middle and Late Precontact periods. The Camp Rayner site is one of the most significant sites in Saskatchewan. Cultural material at this site represents the last 9,000 years of human occupation with in situ deposits spanning approximately 7,000 years ago. The continuous investigation and monitoring of the archaeological record recovered at this site is the key to maintaining these non-renewable resources. The information gathered from this research will supplement research on archaeological occupations of the Northern Plains and will initiate a resource management plan for future excavations and site preservation. Advisors/Committee Members: Walker, Ernest G., Walker, Ryan, Meyer, David, Kennedy, Margaret.

Subjects/Keywords: Camp Rayner Site; Multi-Component Site; EgNr-2; Terminal Late Paleoindian; Resource Management Plan; Middle Precontact Period

…162 13.6. Further Research at the Camp Rayner Site… …Cultures at the Camp Rayner Site ......170 14.1.1 Lithic Raw Material… …182 Appendix B: Lithic Analysis of the Camp Rayner Site… …148 Table 13.1: Outline of further research at the Camp Rayner site… …24 Figure 4.3: Cultural Zones at the Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2)… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cahill, N. (2012). The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cahill, Nathalie. “The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan.” 2012. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cahill, Nathalie. “The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan.” 2012. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Cahill N. The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cahill N. The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Brigham Young University

2. Elsken, Jennifer L. The Historical Ceramics of Camp Floyd.

Degree: MA, 2002, Brigham Young University

This thesis is an historical archaeological project involving the classification and analysis of the ceramics found at Camp Floyd, a 19th century military site 40 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. United States military troops were dispatched to the Utah Territory to establish a Pony Express Station and an Overland Stage Trail, to assert federal authority in the Territories, and to end the ongoing conflict between the federal government and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The primary research question concerned the ceramic usage patterns at Camp Floyd as compared to other military sites and non-residential sites of the 19th century. The ceramic assemblage recovered from Camp Floyd was classified using Berge's classification system of historical ceramics. A sample from this collection was analyzed in order to assess social and economic differences between officers' and enlisted men.

Subjects/Keywords: Camp Floyd; archaeology; archaeological site; 19th century; military; Salt Lake City; Utah; history; Ceramic Arts; Mormon Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elsken, J. L. (2002). The Historical Ceramics of Camp Floyd. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5664&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elsken, Jennifer L. “The Historical Ceramics of Camp Floyd.” 2002. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5664&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elsken, Jennifer L. “The Historical Ceramics of Camp Floyd.” 2002. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Elsken JL. The Historical Ceramics of Camp Floyd. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2002. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5664&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Elsken JL. The Historical Ceramics of Camp Floyd. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2002. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5664&context=etd


University of Otago

3. Kerby, Georgia. Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture .

Degree: University of Otago

Over 140 years of excavation events at the Redcliffs site complex on the edge of Ihutai, Canterbury, has resulted in a unique material culture collection in Canterbury Museum. The site complex’s physical setting is located with easy access to a large range of resources, inland access routes, and shelter on Canterbury’s east coast. However, it lay directly on the shores of a highly dynamic microtidal estuary, which was an open bay upon first Māori arrival to the area and has likely influenced past patterns of settlement and the preservation of the local archaeological record. This thesis has achieved two outcomes. The first was the organisation and synthesis of the archaeological history of the Redcliffs site complex, from 1865-2003, in order to recognise the state and availability of Redcliffs archaeological information for future studies. The second was the production of an artefact inventory and description of the Redcliffs site complex material culture collection based on records in Canterbury Museum. This work supports that Redcliffs was the host of several temporary camps during winter spanning the mid to late 14th century AD to the early 16th century AD. Rather than Redcliffs being simply a ‘Moa Hunter’ camp, as it is often described, it was the locus of broad scale and opportunistic hunter gatherer practices, with a focus on fishing, shellfish collection, and fowling. Moncks Cave’s material culture showed some distinctions to that of the rest of the site complex which, with what is previously known about its faunal record, reveals that large scale cultural changes were taking place between AD1400 to AD1500 in relation to the decline of moa and seal and likely local geomorphological fluctuations. While many more aspects of Redcliffs life need further investigation, particularly the site complex’s chronology, the Redcliffs site complex’s material culture and especially its organic artefacts have revealed a more detailed and realistic image of Māori everyday life during the earliest periods of settlement than previously seen in Aotearoa. Advisors/Committee Members: Walter, Richard (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand; Archaeology; Material Culture; Moa Bone Point Cave; Moncks Cave; Redcliffs Flat; Redcliffs; Sumner Burial Ground; Sumner Cutting; Maori Prehistory; Organic Artefacts; Sumner; Archaic; Maori; Aotearoa; Canterbury Museum; Historic Records; Roger Duff; Michael Trotter; Chris Jacomb; Junior Archaeological Club; Selwyn Hovell; Wooden Artefacts; Culture Change; Geomorphological; Southshore Spit; Moa Bone; Midden; Site Complex; Fourteenth Century; Fifteenth Century; Sixteenth Century; Tranisitonal; Bird Spear Point; Waka; Outrigger Float; Moa Hunter; Julius von Haast; McKay; Inventory; Winter Camp; Avon-Heathcote Estuary; Ihutai

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kerby, G. (n.d.). Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kerby, Georgia. “Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 22, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kerby, Georgia. “Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture .” Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Kerby G. Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Kerby G. Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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