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You searched for subject:(COMPULSIVE BEHAVIOURS). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Mason, Julia. Exploring the Discourses of Compulsive Hair-Pulling: A Body-Mapping Study.

Degree: 2018, Wilfrid Laurier University

Compulsive hair-pulling (which is sometimes diagnosed as the OCD-Related Disorder, Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviour, "Trichotillomania)" is an understudied experience that has significant social and emotional impacts on the women that it affects. This study focused on the meanings that are derived from the interactions that women with compulsive hair-pulling experience with social discourses surrounding mental illness, physical appearance, and behaviour. Guided by relativist ontology and the co-creation of understanding between researcher and participants, this qualitative exploration was guided by anti-oppressive practice and used an arts-based research method called Body-Map Storytelling. In group format, four women were invited to describe their knowledge, experiences, and journey visually on a life-sized tracing of their own body over five consecutive weekly sessions. The end result of these sessions was a life-sized depiction of each person's visual telling of their story, which had been co-created within the context of guided facilitation through the sessions. The visual data and the participants’ personal narratives of creating the body maps were analyzed thematically. The participants shared contrasting experiences of wanting to be both visible and invisible, feeling whole and fragmented, and building oneself up and breaking oneself down. They shared the impacts of compulsive hair-pulling on the pressure that they feel; from self and others, around self-disclosure, to meet social expectations and how they resist this pressure. Participants shared the impacts of being labelled and how they accept, reject and resist labels. The final theme arising from analysis was that of self-guardianship. These findings add to current knowledge on compulsive hair-pulling, mental illness stigma and visual research methodologies as an example of a study guided by anti-oppressive theory conducted by a researcher who herself shares the identity of compulsive hair-puller with the research participants.

Subjects/Keywords: mental health; Trichotillomania; Arts-Based Research; Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviours; Compulsive Hair-Pulling; Anti-Oppressive Practice; Social Work

…Repetitive Behaviours. Due to the behavioural connection in the case of compulsive hair-pulling… …Presenting the body maps at an event. 109 1 Chapter One: Introduction Defining Terms Compulsive… …compulsively. This can be associated with the diagnosis of the Obsessive-Compulsive (OCD)… …Related Disorder Trichotillomania. Compulsive Hair-Puller / Hair-Puller: A person who pulls out… …their hair compulsively. This term is used, as well as the term Compulsive Hair-Pulling (… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mason, J. (2018). Exploring the Discourses of Compulsive Hair-Pulling: A Body-Mapping Study. (Thesis). Wilfrid Laurier University. Retrieved from https://scholars.wlu.ca/etd/2068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mason, Julia. “Exploring the Discourses of Compulsive Hair-Pulling: A Body-Mapping Study.” 2018. Thesis, Wilfrid Laurier University. Accessed July 09, 2020. https://scholars.wlu.ca/etd/2068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mason, Julia. “Exploring the Discourses of Compulsive Hair-Pulling: A Body-Mapping Study.” 2018. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Mason J. Exploring the Discourses of Compulsive Hair-Pulling: A Body-Mapping Study. [Internet] [Thesis]. Wilfrid Laurier University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: https://scholars.wlu.ca/etd/2068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mason J. Exploring the Discourses of Compulsive Hair-Pulling: A Body-Mapping Study. [Thesis]. Wilfrid Laurier University; 2018. Available from: https://scholars.wlu.ca/etd/2068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Lethbridge

2. University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Health Sciences. An ecological and life course analysis of binge drinking and problem gambling among Indigenous populations in Canada .

Degree: 2017, University of Lethbridge

The focus of this thesis was to better understand the link between social environments: namely, the school and workplace; and addictive behaviour among Indigenous youth and adults in Canada. Secondary datasets were accessed and analyzed. Data derived from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey was used to examine the impacts of the school environment, extracurricular activity, and peer risk behaviour on binge drinking among First Nations and Métis youth aged 15 to 24 living in urban environments. Results indicate that peer risk behaviour was the strongest determinant of binge drinking, but that the school environment both positively and negatively influenced peer behaviour making it an important target for interventions to reduce binge drinking. Results suggest increased opportunities for extracurricular activities at school may also reduce binge drinking among Indigenous youth, particularly among those disengaged from school. Data derived from the Quinte Longitudinal Study was used to examine the role of trauma and changes in job satisfaction and stressful life events on at-risk gambling behaviour among employed Indigenous adults. Overall, results indicate that those who were more satisfied in their work were less likely to engage in at-risk gambling. Among Indigenous women, those who experienced more stressful life events were more likely to engage in at-risk gambling. These findings highlight the need for policies and programs aimed upstream to improve work and school environments and reduce structural inequalities.

Subjects/Keywords: addictive behaviours; Indigenous peoples; resilience; school environment; social determinants of health; workplace environment; Binge drinking; Native youth  – Canada; Native youth  – Alcohol use  – Canada; Native young adults  – Canada; Native young adults  – Alcohol use  – Canada; Peer pressure in adolescence; School environment; Indian youth  – Canada; Indian youth  – Alcohol use  – Canada; Indian high school students  – Alcohol use  – Canada; Compulsive gambling; Job satisfaction; Life change events; Work environment; Native men  – Canada; Native men  – Gambling  – Canada; Native women  – Canada; Native women  – Gambling  – Canada; Indigenous men  – Gambling  – Canada; Indigenous women  – Gambling  – Canada

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sciences, U. o. L. F. o. H. (2017). An ecological and life course analysis of binge drinking and problem gambling among Indigenous populations in Canada . (Thesis). University of Lethbridge. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10133/4842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sciences, University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Health. “An ecological and life course analysis of binge drinking and problem gambling among Indigenous populations in Canada .” 2017. Thesis, University of Lethbridge. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10133/4842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sciences, University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Health. “An ecological and life course analysis of binge drinking and problem gambling among Indigenous populations in Canada .” 2017. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Sciences UoLFoH. An ecological and life course analysis of binge drinking and problem gambling among Indigenous populations in Canada . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Lethbridge; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10133/4842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sciences UoLFoH. An ecological and life course analysis of binge drinking and problem gambling among Indigenous populations in Canada . [Thesis]. University of Lethbridge; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10133/4842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.