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You searched for subject:(CACGS). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Oregon

1. Garcia, Eric. Career Information System Utilization and High School Students’ Vocational Skills Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, Work Hope, Career Planning, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties.

Degree: 2019, University of Oregon

The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of Career Information System (CIS) on high school students’ vocational skills self-efficacy, outcome expectations, work hope, career planning, career decision-making difficulties and postsecondary plans. CIS is an internet-based computer system of occupational and educational information designed to help users become more knowledgeable about the labor market and education system, as well as provide career planning support. Students from two high schools participated in the study. Participants at School A were first-year students who completed the Interest Profiler module of CIS. Participants at School B were first-year students who completed the Interest Profiler, IDEAS, SKILLS, Reality Check, and Work Importance Locator modules of CIS. First-year students who did not participate in the CIS intervention served as the control group in both schools. Participants in both schools who utilized the CIS intervention demonstrated a number of significant differences compared to control group participants at posttest. School A treatment participants' vocational outcome expectations and work hope were higher and career decision-making difficulties (i.e. inconsistent information and lack of information) were lower compared to control participants. School A treatment group participants were also more likely to indicate postsecondary educational plans of specialized training, 2-year community college, or 4-year college, instead of no education plans, compared to control group participants. School B treatment participants' vocational skills self-efficacy was significantly higher than control participants at posttest. Treatment group participants at both schools demonstrated more changes in their occupational interests compared to control group participants at posttest. The effects of CIS did not vary as a function of race/ethnicity or socioeconomic status in regards to any of the career outcome variables in either school. Implications for the use of CIS among first-year high school students will be discussed and suggestions for future research will be provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Hawley McWhirter, Ellen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: CACGS; Career development; Computer-assisted; High school

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garcia, E. (2019). Career Information System Utilization and High School Students’ Vocational Skills Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, Work Hope, Career Planning, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties. (Thesis). University of Oregon. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24173

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garcia, Eric. “Career Information System Utilization and High School Students’ Vocational Skills Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, Work Hope, Career Planning, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties.” 2019. Thesis, University of Oregon. Accessed August 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24173.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garcia, Eric. “Career Information System Utilization and High School Students’ Vocational Skills Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, Work Hope, Career Planning, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties.” 2019. Web. 17 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Garcia E. Career Information System Utilization and High School Students’ Vocational Skills Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, Work Hope, Career Planning, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2019. [cited 2019 Aug 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24173.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Garcia E. Career Information System Utilization and High School Students’ Vocational Skills Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, Work Hope, Career Planning, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties. [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24173

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Colorado State University

2. McLaren, Molly Rae. Moderators of efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) intervention.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2007, Colorado State University

Research investigating career intervention efficacy has inadequately investigated the identification of important client factors which might moderate the effects of various career interventions. The current study had two aims. First it examined the efficacy of a newly developed Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) used alone, and the same CACGS used in conjunction with a structured workshop intervention, as compared to a business-as-usual control group. Secondly, this study also investigated moderators for the efficacy of these career interventions (i.e., gender, minority status, SES, cognitive/emotional disability status, career locus of control, career decision-making readiness, and career needs). Using a sample of 609 students from community colleges and a four-year university, main effects indicated that the CACGS plus workshop condition was effective in improving career decision-making self-efficacy, and outcome expectations strivings, as well as reducing career decision-making difficulties. Results from moderator analyses suggest that SES significantly moderated the relationship between treatment condition and career decision-making self-efficacy such that participants reporting lower levels of SES benefited more from the CACGS plus workshop condition. Career needs were also found to be a significant moderator for the relationship between treatment condition and the following outcomes: career decision-making difficulties and academic major satisfaction. The interaction was such that participants reporting career needs congruent with the aims of the intervention had reduced decision-making difficulties and increased academic major satisfaction as compared with participants reporting incongruent career needs. No other significant moderator effects were found. Consistent with past research, results of this study suggest that CACGS interventions may be more effective when paired with a face-to-face intervention component. The results also suggest that the efficacy of career interventions may not vary meaningfully across a range of different populations. Socioeconomic status and types of career needs may tend to be a significant client factors to consider in terms of career intervention efficacy. Implications for practice and recommendations for future research are offered. Advisors/Committee Members: Dik, Bryan (advisor), Kraiger, Kurt (committee member), Feller, Richard (committee member), Rickard, Kathryn (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: CACGS; career; counseling; efficacy; intervention; moderators

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McLaren, M. R. (2007). Moderators of efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/80164

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McLaren, Molly Rae. “Moderators of efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) intervention.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed August 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/80164.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McLaren, Molly Rae. “Moderators of efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) intervention.” 2007. Web. 17 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

McLaren MR. Moderators of efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Aug 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/80164.

Council of Science Editors:

McLaren MR. Moderators of efficacy for a Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System (CACGS) intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/80164

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