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You searched for subject:(C corporations). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Hu, Zhenhua. Two Essays on Corporate Income Taxes and Organizational Forms in the United States.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy, 2006, Georgia Tech

Corporate income taxation has a profound impact on economic behavior in the United States. This dissertation focuses on two aspects: the impact of dividend taxation on investment and the impact of corporate income tax exemption on nonprofit organizations activity. The first essay compares dividend payout ratios of C and S corporations to test the validity of the traditional and the new views on dividend taxation. Average corporate income tax rate is used as an instrumental variable. The results support the traditional view. The second essay focuses on whether the exemption of nonprofit organizations from the corporate income tax affects the competition between for-profit and nonprofit hospitals. Time series and panel data analysis show that tax subsidies to nonprofit organizations have a positive impact on nonprofit hospitals market share. Advisors/Committee Members: Gregory B. Lewis (Committee Chair), Bruce Seaman (Committee Member), Douglas Noonan (Committee Member), Michael Rushton (Committee Member), Sally Wallace (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: C corporations; S corporations; Corporate income tax; For-profit organizations; Double taxation; Nonprofit organizations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hu, Z. (2006). Two Essays on Corporate Income Taxes and Organizational Forms in the United States. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hu, Zhenhua. “Two Essays on Corporate Income Taxes and Organizational Forms in the United States.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hu, Zhenhua. “Two Essays on Corporate Income Taxes and Organizational Forms in the United States.” 2006. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hu Z. Two Essays on Corporate Income Taxes and Organizational Forms in the United States. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10442.

Council of Science Editors:

Hu Z. Two Essays on Corporate Income Taxes and Organizational Forms in the United States. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10442


University of Hong Kong

2. 陳仁川. Cross-cultural communication in a Japanese multinational company in Hong Kong.

Degree: 2002, University of Hong Kong

Subjects/Keywords: Corporations, Japanese - Cannot find the sub-field 'C' for code '650' - Hong Kong - Management.; Corporate culture - China - Hong Kong.; Intercultural communication - China - Hong Kong - Case studies.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

陳仁川.. (2002). Cross-cultural communication in a Japanese multinational company in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10722/55616

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

陳仁川.. “Cross-cultural communication in a Japanese multinational company in Hong Kong.” 2002. Thesis, University of Hong Kong. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10722/55616.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

陳仁川.. “Cross-cultural communication in a Japanese multinational company in Hong Kong.” 2002. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

陳仁川.. Cross-cultural communication in a Japanese multinational company in Hong Kong. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Hong Kong; 2002. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10722/55616.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

陳仁川.. Cross-cultural communication in a Japanese multinational company in Hong Kong. [Thesis]. University of Hong Kong; 2002. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10722/55616

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Kinuthia, Wanyee. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .

Degree: 2013, University of Ottawa

This thesis draws on David Harvey’s concept of “accumulation by dispossession” and an international political economy (IPE) approach centred on the institutional arrangements and power structures that privilege certain actors and values, in order to critique current capitalist practices of primitive accumulation by the global corporate extractive industry. The thesis examines how accumulation by dispossession by the global extractive industry is facilitated by the “free entry” or “free mining” principle. It does so by focusing on Canada as a leader in the global extractive industry and the spread of this country’s mining laws to other countries – in other words, the transnationalisation of norms in the global extractive industry – so as to maintain a consistent and familiar operating environment for Canadian extractive companies. The transnationalisation of norms is further promoted by key international institutions such as the World Bank, which is also the world’s largest development lender and also plays a key role in shaping the regulations that govern natural resource extraction. The thesis briefly investigates some Canadian examples of resource extraction projects, in order to demonstrate the weaknesses of Canadian mining laws, particularly the lack of protection of landowners’ rights under the free entry system and the subsequent need for “free, prior and informed consent” (FPIC). The thesis also considers some of the challenges to the adoption and implementation of the right to FPIC. These challenges include embedded institutional structures like the free entry mining system, international political economy (IPE) as shaped by international institutions and powerful corporations, as well as concerns regarding ‘local’ power structures or the legitimacy of representatives of communities affected by extractive projects. The thesis concludes that in order for Canada to be truly recognized as a leader in the global extractive industry, it must establish legal norms domestically to ensure that Canadian mining companies and residents can be held accountable when there is evidence of environmental and/or human rights violations associated with the activities of Canadian mining companies abroad. The thesis also concludes that Canada needs to address underlying structural issues such as the free entry mining system and implement FPIC, in order to curb “accumulation by dispossession” by the extractive industry, both domestically and abroad.

Subjects/Keywords: natural resources; raw materials; global extractive industry; mining; accumulation by dispossession; primitive accumulation; resource curse; free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC); consultation; free entry; Bill C-300; Omnibus Bill; self-determination; madaraka; multinational / transnational corporations; land grabs; governance gap; enforcement vacuum; regulatory gap; landlessness; involuntary resettlement; displacement; liberalization; financial markets; capitalism; International Monetary Fund (IMF); Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability (CNCA); Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA); Impact and Benefits Agreement (IBA); corporate social responsibility (CSR); international political economy (IPE); Washington Consensus; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP); sustainable development; rare earth; oil; fossil fuels; Whitehorse Mining Initiative (WMI); foreign direct investment (FDI); privatization; Canadian Centre for the Study of Resource Conflict (CCSRC); Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade (SCFAIT); Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD); neoliberal / corporate globalization; Northern Gateway pipeline project; Ring of Fire; centre-periphery; metropolitan-hinterland; Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); Gross Domestic Product (GDP); Extractive Industries Review (EIR); Sub-Saharan Africa; war on terror; terrorists; false flag terrorism; Fisheries Act; Navigable Waters Protection Act; primary goods; aid; Third World debt; free trade; modernization; dependency; tariffs; trade barriers; HudBay; home country liability; state; Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX); Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC); spatio-temporal fix; militarism; Sudbury; Atlantic Canada; Crown; neo-colonialism; industrial revolution; imperialism; public policy; democracy; justice; Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA); Export Development Corporation (EDC); Kimberley Process; International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM); Mining Association of Canada; National Roundtables on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the Canadian Extractive Industry in Developing Countries; equity; austerity measures; Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO); Mining Act reforms; proletariat; aboriginal; Least Developed Countries (LDCs); developing country; comparative advantage; human rights; export-led development; Tiomin; Government of Kenya; Government of Canada; Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC); World Bank Group (WBG); World Trade Organization (WTO); United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP); Bill C-38; Bill C-45; Assembly of First Nations (AFN); Idle No More; meaningful participation; AFRICOM; titanium; Base Resources Australia; House of Commons; conditionalities; Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs); World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

…human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises, John Ruggie… …protest-mexico_n_1828923.html 13 Hassanein, A., Lundholm, G., Willis, G., & Young, C. (2009… …General on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business… …to 17 Ruggie, J.G. (2010). Governing Transnational Corporations - http… …injustice-abroad-121231 19 Coumans, C. (2010). Alternative Accountability Mechanisms and… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kinuthia, W. (2013). “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinuthia, Wanyee. ““Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .” 2013. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinuthia, Wanyee. ““Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .” 2013. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kinuthia W. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kinuthia W. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.