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You searched for subject:(Broadside ballad). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Miami

1. Prineppi, Georgina. Sailors in British Broadside Ballads, 1800-1850.

Degree: MM, Musicology (Music), 2015, University of Miami

The broadside ballad was an important form of popular street music that flourished from the 16th to the 19th centuries in the British Isles, Continental Europe and North America. During the Napoleonic Wars, Britain’s fighting sailor—commonly known as “Jack Tar”—became a prominent subject of the country’s broadside ballad tradition, thanks to songwriters like Charles Dibdin, who forged a new and compelling image for the sailor, depicting him as Britain’s brave, patriotic, and loyal defender. In the early years of the nineteenth century, hundreds of broadside ballads about the noble Jack Tar were written and circulated in Britain, extolling his virtues and highlighting his importance for national defense. Based on extensive primary research into broadside ballad archives, this thesis will holistically and comprehensively examine nineteenth-century broadside ballads about Britain’s fighting sailor. It will elucidate the complex image of Jack Tar in these popular songs, exploring his evolving and multi-faceted characterization, his profound cultural implications, and his intriguing iconography as both protector of Britain’s monarchy and republican hero. In addition, this thesis will carefully examine the music, history, forms, conventions, writers, printers, and performance practices of the nineteenth-century popular songs that brought Jack Tar to the forefront of wartime Britain’s imagination. Advisors/Committee Members: Melissa de Graaf, Karen Henson, Karen Kennedy.

Subjects/Keywords: Broadside ballad; ballad; Jack Tar; sailor songs; British popular song; British street music

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prineppi, G. (2015). Sailors in British Broadside Ballads, 1800-1850. (Thesis). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/551

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prineppi, Georgina. “Sailors in British Broadside Ballads, 1800-1850.” 2015. Thesis, University of Miami. Accessed November 14, 2019. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/551.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prineppi, Georgina. “Sailors in British Broadside Ballads, 1800-1850.” 2015. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Prineppi G. Sailors in British Broadside Ballads, 1800-1850. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Miami; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/551.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Prineppi G. Sailors in British Broadside Ballads, 1800-1850. [Thesis]. University of Miami; 2015. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/551

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

2. Spanos, Joanna Beth. Redeeming Susanna Cox: A Pennsylvania German Infanticide in Community Tradition.

Degree: PhD, Comparative Studies, 2013, The Ohio State University

In 1809, Susanna Cox, a twenty-four year old servant living in Oley, Pennsylvania, was accused, convicted, and executed following the death of her newborn son. Throughout the next two hundred years, Susanna’s story would be transmitted through oral histories and printed and performed broadside ballads. Perhaps the most widely diffused version of the story began in the early 1960s at the Pennsylvania Dutch Folk Festival (now called the Kutztown Folk Festival) when the festival organizers revived her story in the public imagination. Over 50 years later, Cox’s story is still retold at the Kutztown Folk Festival, three times a day for nine days, with the visual addition of a hanging reenactment.This dissertation explores the interplay between history, social memory, and oral tradition as it occurs surrounding the ongoing use of Susanna Cox’s story. I explore the exposition of her story between the discovery of her son’s death and her execution, as well as the legal impact – real or perceived –of the case in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The broadside ballad also maintained currency as it was translated and reprinted in various North American locations throughout the nineteenth century. I go on to discuss the ways that the story has been transmitted and reinterpreted into the 21st century, examining the recorded, published, performed and electronically-disseminated versions and audience responses to them.This project combines textual interpretation, archival research, oral history interviewing, and ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2009 and 2013I explore why various communities – ethnic, gendered, religious, or geographic – chose to claim Cox and redeem her soul, reputation, or memory. Susanna Cox was a woman whose actions went against the legal and moral standards of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In her own time, she provided a focus for public debate over the death penalty and the role of secular and religious education in equipping individuals for appropriate participation within the new Republic. Her story would continue to be raised both as a warning against inappropriate behavior and as an example of the misuses of the legal system. Later generations would repurpose Cox’s story to meet their own needs, interpreting it through contemporary lenses or simply presenting her as an icon of a previous time. Coupled with her tie to the place, the dearth of evidence detailing her life, actions, and motivations renders Susanna Cox available as a cultural touchstone: a familiar case that inhabitants of the region can call upon as a touchstone in assessing shifting attitudes towards gender, crime, and responsibility. Advisors/Committee Members: Noyes, Dorothy (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Folklore; History; Legal Studies; Womens Studies; American Studies; Maternal Infanticide, Pennsylvania German, Heritage Festival, Broadside Ballad, Early Republic Legal History, Capital Punishment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Spanos, J. B. (2013). Redeeming Susanna Cox: A Pennsylvania German Infanticide in Community Tradition. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1376916983

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spanos, Joanna Beth. “Redeeming Susanna Cox: A Pennsylvania German Infanticide in Community Tradition.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1376916983.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spanos, Joanna Beth. “Redeeming Susanna Cox: A Pennsylvania German Infanticide in Community Tradition.” 2013. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Spanos JB. Redeeming Susanna Cox: A Pennsylvania German Infanticide in Community Tradition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1376916983.

Council of Science Editors:

Spanos JB. Redeeming Susanna Cox: A Pennsylvania German Infanticide in Community Tradition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2013. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1376916983


University of Southern California

3. Smith, Matthew J. Stage, cathedral, wagon, street: the grounds of belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance performance.

Degree: PhD, English, 2012, University of Southern California

""Stage, Cathedral, Wagon, Street: The Grounds of Belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance Performance"" expands what counts as belief in historical performance. It explores how belief sounded, looked, and felt to audiences in Renaissance England. To this extent, my dissertation suggests a radical reorientation of the study of drama and religion. Most scholars study performed religion primarily in terms of how it was “represented” on stage: signified by certain verbal and visual images and decoded, in effect, by audiences. This approach has produced insightful material histories of religion but is limited both by its focus on allusion—re-presentation—and because it recognizes belief primarily where it can be corroborated by comparison to more conventional sites of religion, such as the church and established religious texts. I argue that belief existed at more basic experiential levels, in the perceptual habits of audiences, in the environmental “grounds” of the performance venue, and in what are often considered the mundane and marginal aspects of the playgoing experience—such as ambient distractions, acoustics, dramaturgical transparency, and even admission fees. The result is a depiction of communal belief that collaborated with its performative media. In essence, by studying the phenomenal conditions of historical performance through its props, spaces, and bodies, I am expanding belief beyond the confines of religion and into activities that were fundamental to attending a performance in Renaissance England. Advisors/Committee Members: Smith, Bruce R. (Committee Chair), James, Heather (Committee Member), Lemon, Rebecca (Committee Member), Rollo, David (Committee Member), Albertson, David C. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Shakespeare; drama; theater; performance; sermon; ballad; broadside; pageant; cycle play; Chester; corpus Christi play; mystery play; Henry V; Hamlet; John Donne; Philip Massinger; phenomenology; environment; belief; religion; Christianity; popular piety; popular culture; senses; body; stage; epistemology; ambience; dramaturgy; ceremony; conceit

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, M. J. (2012). Stage, cathedral, wagon, street: the grounds of belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/97913/rec/6025

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Matthew J. “Stage, cathedral, wagon, street: the grounds of belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance performance.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/97913/rec/6025.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Matthew J. “Stage, cathedral, wagon, street: the grounds of belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance performance.” 2012. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith MJ. Stage, cathedral, wagon, street: the grounds of belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/97913/rec/6025.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith MJ. Stage, cathedral, wagon, street: the grounds of belief in Shakespeare and Renaissance performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/97913/rec/6025

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