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You searched for subject:(Bone char). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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KTH

1. Hyder, A.H.M Golam. Sorption Characteristics of Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] onto Bone Char and Bio-char.

Degree: Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), 2013, KTH

The sorption characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] onto bone char and bio-char were evaluated as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and dosages of bone char and bio-char. Batch tests were conducted by using synthetic wastewater in this study. The effects of various initial Cr(VI) concentrations between 5 mg/L and 1000 mg/L were evaluated using bone char as a sorbent. A Cr(VI) removal efficiency of 100 % was achieved at pH 1 with 2 g of bone char in 50 mL of solution at 3 hours of reaction time using initial Cr(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L. About 100 % of Cr(VI) was removed at pH 2 with initial Cr(VI) concentrations of 10 mg/L using 4 g of bio-char in 200 mL of solution at 5 hours of reaction time. The initial Cr(VI) concentrations were varied between 10 mg/L and 500 mg/L when bio-char was used as the sorbent. The maximum sorption capacities of bone char and bio-char were determined to 6.46 mg Cr(VI)/g, and 1.717 mg Cr(VI)/g, respectively. Equilibrium, kinetics, and isotherms of the sorption process were also investigated. The sorption kinetics of Cr(VI) onto bone char and bio-char followed the second order kinetic model suggesting that the sorption reaction rate depends on two parameters, which might be the sorbate concentration and sorbent dosage. The Langmuir isotherm model was the best one for the description of sorption of Cr(VI) onto bone char and bio-char.

Subjects/Keywords: Sorption; Bone char; Bio-char; Kinetics; Equilibrium; Isotherms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hyder, A. H. M. G. (2013). Sorption Characteristics of Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] onto Bone Char and Bio-char. (Thesis). KTH. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-171833

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hyder, A H M Golam. “Sorption Characteristics of Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] onto Bone Char and Bio-char.” 2013. Thesis, KTH. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-171833.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hyder, A H M Golam. “Sorption Characteristics of Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] onto Bone Char and Bio-char.” 2013. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Hyder AHMG. Sorption Characteristics of Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] onto Bone Char and Bio-char. [Internet] [Thesis]. KTH; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-171833.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hyder AHMG. Sorption Characteristics of Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] onto Bone Char and Bio-char. [Thesis]. KTH; 2013. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-171833

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Oklahoma

2. Brunson, Laura R. AN INVESTIGATION OF SUSTAINABLE FLUORIDE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES WITH A FOCUS ON ETHIOPIA.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Oklahoma

Human consumption of unsafe drinking water from an unimproved source is a global issue affecting approximately 748 million people worldwide. While this number has been decreasing in recent years, an additional 1.2 billion people are estimated to lack access to water that is consistently free from health risks. This dissertation begins with a literature review investigating drinking water improvement initiatives around the world and a discussion of reasons why these initiatives often fail. Resources are provided for researchers and practitioners working on drinking water treatment implementations and examples of implementations that have failed or succeeded are discussed. The conclusion from this review is that global drinking water solutions will be more effective when designed and implemented by personnel from multiple disciplines. For example, people in several fields, including: social sciences, engineering and business, should collaborate and share ideas and expertise. Ideally this collaboration should start at the genesis of a project and continue through implementation and follow up. There is hope that the synergistic efforts of multidisciplinary teams will help to increase the number of successful water initiatives. Next the dissertation focuses on the problem of elevated fluoride concentrations in drinking water. Naturally occurring fluoride is the second largest issue contributing to the global water crisis. It is estimated that globally over 200 million people are affected by elevated concentrations of fluoride in drinking water. The goal of the technical portion of this dissertation is to investigate locally available and sustainable materials that can be used to remove fluoride from drinking water, with a focus on Ethiopia and eastern Sub-Saharan Africa. Bone char is very effective as an adsorptive material, but is not always accepted by communities due to religious or cultural beliefs. Therefore, this research evaluated methods to improve the fluoride removal capacity of bone char as well as investigated materials that might serve as a replacement for bone char in appropriate communities. Eucalyptus trees are prevalent in Ethiopia where a large fluoride problem exists, and thus, eucalyptus wood char was investigated as a potential substitute for bone char. This dissertation studied wood char produced from Eucalyptus robusta as an adsorption material to remove fluoride from water, thereby making it safe for consumption. Although the use of eucalyptus wood char alone removed minimal fluoride, when it was amended with aluminum and iron oxides it evidenced much higher fluoride removal capacities. Metal oxides, produced from starting materials such as aluminum sulfate and iron (III) nitrate, were used to amend the wood char. Metal amendments resulted in fluoride removal capacities ranging from 3 to 50 times higher than wood char without amendment. The combination of wood char and metal oxide amendment is synergistic because the wood char provides a matrix with a high specific surface area for the… Advisors/Committee Members: Sabatini, David (advisor), Butler, Elizabeth (committee member), Nairn, Robert (committee member), Knox, Robert (committee member), Busenitz, Lowell (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Drinking water; Fluoride; Bone char filtration; Wood char filtration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brunson, L. R. (2014). AN INVESTIGATION OF SUSTAINABLE FLUORIDE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES WITH A FOCUS ON ETHIOPIA. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/13393

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brunson, Laura R. “AN INVESTIGATION OF SUSTAINABLE FLUORIDE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES WITH A FOCUS ON ETHIOPIA.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/13393.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brunson, Laura R. “AN INVESTIGATION OF SUSTAINABLE FLUORIDE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES WITH A FOCUS ON ETHIOPIA.” 2014. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Brunson LR. AN INVESTIGATION OF SUSTAINABLE FLUORIDE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES WITH A FOCUS ON ETHIOPIA. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/13393.

Council of Science Editors:

Brunson LR. AN INVESTIGATION OF SUSTAINABLE FLUORIDE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES WITH A FOCUS ON ETHIOPIA. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/13393


Cornell University

3. Zwetsloot, Marie. Plant Available Phosphorus From Bone Char And Biochar Additions In A Phosphorus-Fixing Soil .

Degree: 2013, Cornell University

Managing phosphorus (P) plant availability in soils and efficient usage of P fertilizers are essential for agricultural sustainability worldwide. Since P is an immobile nutrient, preventing Pdeficiency in crops becomes especially challenging in highly weathered, acid soils that are prone to strong P adsorption. With the rapid depletion of global P reserves, finding alternatives to rock phosphate-dependent fertilizers and management practices that enhance P availability in agricultural ecosystems will become even more critical. Recycling P from slaughterhouse waste into bone char fertilizers through pyrolysis could make human P usage more sustainable and affordable. Animal bone is rich in calcium phosphates (CaP), but many of its uses are banned due to the risk of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). Charring bone could overcome this problem through heat sterilization. Bone char has been used as P fertilizer for centuries; however, little is known about how pyrolysis production conditions influence the chemical P characteristics of bone fertilizers. Applying organic matter in form of biomass or biochar as strategy to enhance P availability and reduce P adsorption to mineral oxides also warrants further investigation. Moreover, few studies address soil management and plant foraging strategies to improve P accumulation simultaneously and little is known about how plants with different rooting strategies obtain access to P sources with varying solubility. The study discussed in the first chapter of this thesis used X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and wet-chemistry extractions to determine (1) how pyrolysis temperature and biomass additions influence P chemistry in bone char and (2) how CaP crystallinity affects the fertilizer potential of bone char. The second chapter discusses an abiotic incubation and pot trial with maize (Zea mays L., variety B73) designed with the objectives (1) to test the P fertilizer characteristics of bone char in comparison to TSP fertilizer in a P-fixing soil, (2) to determine the effect of co-pyrolyzed biochar on P availability, and (3) to analyze how maize roots with varying soil exploration capacity access different P sources. Olsen-extractions and anion-exchange resins (AER) were used to determine P availability in incubated soils. Maize mutants without root hairs and arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM, Glomus clarum, strain WV235) inoculants were used to alter the soil exploration capacity of maize. Morphological characteristics of roots were quantified after scanning using the software package WinRHIZO Pro 2007d. Results show that increasing pyrolysis temperature enhances CaP crystal formation. Copyrolysis with biomass reduces CaP crystallization. Higher CaP crystallinity is associated with lower water-soluble P and higher formic acid-extractable P. Charring bone at 350°C results in a 67% increase in resin-P when incubated in a P-fixing soil. The addition of wood biochar decreases resin-P by 14-26%, while uncharred wood increases resin-P by 23%. This may indicate… Advisors/Committee Members: Bauerle, Taryn L. (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: phosphorus; soil; bone char; biochar; maize rooting strategies; XANES; arbuscular mycorrhizae; P adsorption

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zwetsloot, M. (2013). Plant Available Phosphorus From Bone Char And Biochar Additions In A Phosphorus-Fixing Soil . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34315

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zwetsloot, Marie. “Plant Available Phosphorus From Bone Char And Biochar Additions In A Phosphorus-Fixing Soil .” 2013. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34315.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zwetsloot, Marie. “Plant Available Phosphorus From Bone Char And Biochar Additions In A Phosphorus-Fixing Soil .” 2013. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Zwetsloot M. Plant Available Phosphorus From Bone Char And Biochar Additions In A Phosphorus-Fixing Soil . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34315.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zwetsloot M. Plant Available Phosphorus From Bone Char And Biochar Additions In A Phosphorus-Fixing Soil . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34315

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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