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You searched for subject:(Black Girls Rock). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Wheeler, Sika Adzo. Black Girls Rock! and the Politics of Empowerment.

Degree: 2016, Penn State University

In the contemporary moment in popular culture, there seems to be an increase in media messages targeted toward Black women and girls under the notion of “empowerment.” This is a shift from a history of racist, misogynist representations of Black femininity in visual culture but not without complications. This thesis explores these notions of empowerment as portrayed through a case study of the BET awards program Black Girls Rock!. Using textual analysis of the program as well as of online feminist responses to the program, this study presents a way of understanding the challenges to engaging in authentic Black girl empowerment through popular media. While such programs extend the efforts of Black feminist scholars and activists by doing the important work of resisting the abundance of negative representation in visual media with positive affirmation for Black women and girls, these efforts still render Black girls as helpless and perpetually at-risk. Even in online responses, the overwhelming focus on proving why Black women should be empowered as a response to social media backlash is a distraction from focusing on enacting a process of empowerment for Black girls. In conversation with Black feminism, media studies, girl studies, and emerging scholarship on Black girlhood, this study considers how best to understand the changing landscape of media culture in terms of race, gender, and youth empowerment. Advisors/Committee Members: Matthew Paul Mcallister, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Michelle Lyn Rodino, Committee Member, Denise Sevick Bortree, Committee Member.

Subjects/Keywords: black girls; empowerment; youth; girlhood; black feminism; black entertainment television; television; race; gender; celebrity; misogynoir; black girls rock

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APA (6th Edition):

Wheeler, S. A. (2016). Black Girls Rock! and the Politics of Empowerment. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/3f462540k

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wheeler, Sika Adzo. “Black Girls Rock! and the Politics of Empowerment.” 2016. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed January 21, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/3f462540k.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wheeler, Sika Adzo. “Black Girls Rock! and the Politics of Empowerment.” 2016. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wheeler SA. Black Girls Rock! and the Politics of Empowerment. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/3f462540k.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wheeler SA. Black Girls Rock! and the Politics of Empowerment. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/3f462540k

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Louisiana State University

2. Smith, Allison Michelle. Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2016, Louisiana State University

In choosing to look at the impact of white racially homogeneous work environments, if any, in relation to Black women higher education administrators, this research was grounded in Patricia Hill Collins’ Black Feminist Thought. Utilizing Black Feminist Thought, rooted in intersectionality, provided a sturdy foundation for one interested in conducting research specific to Black women, whether the discourse is race, gender, and/or any other intersecting identities. Black Feminist Thought conveys the message that Black women have similar yet different experiences from White women and similar yet different experiences from Black men, while simultaneously having shared yet different experiences than other Black women in all aspects of life, racially, sexually, gender-wise, socially and politically. Through eight (8) semi-structured interviews, a demographic survey, self-selected organizational and departmental perception, the researcher aimed to capture the essence of what it like to work in higher education administration at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) as a Black woman, as a double minority, with limited or no daily interaction with other Black women, Black men, or Black students. Through the course of interviews and subsequent data analysis, four themes emerged: (1) Increased desire to connect with other Black women, (2) Recognized pervasiveness of intersectional discrimination, (3) Racially-influenced decision-making, and (4) Adherence to a spiritual belief. Additionally, the researcher has compiled recommendations for hiring, supporting and retaining Black women administrators at PWIs, specifically those in non-ethnic or culturally-centered areas.

Subjects/Keywords: Black Girl Magic; higher education; higher education administration; PWI; predominantly White institution; retention; Black Girls are Magic; Black Girls Rock; Black Women; Black Women administrators; Black female administrators; Black female

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, A. M. (2016). Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Louisiana State University. Retrieved from etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Allison Michelle. “Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Louisiana State University. Accessed January 21, 2021. etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Allison Michelle. “Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions.” 2016. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith AM. Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith AM. Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2016. Available from: etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470

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