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You searched for subject:(Black Girl Magic). Showing records 1 – 4 of 4 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Thompson, Valerie. Sistas in Crisis: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lives of Black Women Student Affairs Practitioners within Historically White Institutions.

Degree: PhD, 2020, University of Oklahoma

Black women practitioners who work at Historically White Institutions occupy institutional spaces that were not created to support how they exist and thrive as Black(more)

Subjects/Keywords: Black Women; Student Affairs Practitioners; Intersectional Burnout and Stress; Strong Black Woman; Black Girl Magic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thompson, V. (2020). Sistas in Crisis: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lives of Black Women Student Affairs Practitioners within Historically White Institutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324393

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thompson, Valerie. “Sistas in Crisis: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lives of Black Women Student Affairs Practitioners within Historically White Institutions.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324393.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thompson, Valerie. “Sistas in Crisis: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lives of Black Women Student Affairs Practitioners within Historically White Institutions.” 2020. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Thompson V. Sistas in Crisis: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lives of Black Women Student Affairs Practitioners within Historically White Institutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324393.

Council of Science Editors:

Thompson V. Sistas in Crisis: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lives of Black Women Student Affairs Practitioners within Historically White Institutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/324393


Louisiana State University

2. Smith, Allison Michelle. Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2016, Louisiana State University

 In choosing to look at the impact of white racially homogeneous work environments, if any, in relation to Black women higher education administrators, this research… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Black Girl Magic; higher education; higher education administration; PWI; predominantly White institution; retention; Black Girls are Magic; Black Girls Rock; Black Women; Black Women administrators; Black female administrators; Black female

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, A. M. (2016). Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Louisiana State University. Retrieved from etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Allison Michelle. “Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Louisiana State University. Accessed January 19, 2021. etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Allison Michelle. “Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions.” 2016. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith AM. Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith AM. Black Girl Magic: How Black Women Administrators Navigate the Intersection of Race and Gender in Workspace Silos at Predominantly White Institutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Louisiana State University; 2016. Available from: etd-07082016-173732 ; https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/3470


University of South Florida

3. Serls, Tangela La'Chelle. The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature.

Degree: 2017, University of South Florida

 The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature examines spiritual subjectivities that inspire girlfriends in three contemporary novels to journey towards actualization. It… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Subjectivity; The Erotic; Epistemology; Black Girl Magic; African American Studies; Arts and Humanities; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Serls, T. L. (2017). The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7442

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Serls, Tangela La'Chelle. “The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature.” 2017. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7442.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Serls, Tangela La'Chelle. “The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature.” 2017. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Serls TL. The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7442.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Serls TL. The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2017. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7442

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Tech

4. Thompson, Joy Janetta. The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural".

Degree: MS, Sociology, 2018, Virginia Tech

 The purpose of this study is to analyze and understand why some Black women in Greensboro, North Carolina have made the decision to wear their… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Black girl magic; Africana Diaspora; Natural Hair; Natural Beauty; Black Hair; Going Natural; Black women; Greensboro; North Carolina; Perms; Relaxers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thompson, J. J. (2018). The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural". (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thompson, Joy Janetta. “The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural".” 2018. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thompson, Joy Janetta. “The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural".” 2018. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Thompson JJ. The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural". [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891.

Council of Science Editors:

Thompson JJ. The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural". [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891

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