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Dept: Department of Biology

You searched for subject:(Birds ). Showing records 1 – 19 of 19 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Certain, David Lee. A multiscale analysis of nest-site choice, nest success, and population abundance in the scissor-tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus).

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 2000, University of Oklahoma

 Large-scale declines in the abundance of many bird species in North America has led to an increased research on the nesting habits of these species.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Birds Habitat Oklahoma.; Birds.; Biology, Ecology.; Birds Nests Oklahoma.

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APA (6th Edition):

Certain, D. L. (2000). A multiscale analysis of nest-site choice, nest success, and population abundance in the scissor-tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus). (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/6031

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Certain, David Lee. “A multiscale analysis of nest-site choice, nest success, and population abundance in the scissor-tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus).” 2000. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/6031.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Certain, David Lee. “A multiscale analysis of nest-site choice, nest success, and population abundance in the scissor-tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus).” 2000. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Certain DL. A multiscale analysis of nest-site choice, nest success, and population abundance in the scissor-tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2000. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/6031.

Council of Science Editors:

Certain DL. A multiscale analysis of nest-site choice, nest success, and population abundance in the scissor-tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus). [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2000. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/6031


McGill University

2. DesGranges, J.-L. Interactions among resident and migrant hummingbirds in Mexico.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 1977, McGill University

Subjects/Keywords: Hummingbirds.; Birds  – Mexico.

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APA (6th Edition):

DesGranges, J. -. (1977). Interactions among resident and migrant hummingbirds in Mexico. (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76227.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

DesGranges, J -L. “Interactions among resident and migrant hummingbirds in Mexico.” 1977. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76227.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

DesGranges, J -L. “Interactions among resident and migrant hummingbirds in Mexico.” 1977. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

DesGranges J-. Interactions among resident and migrant hummingbirds in Mexico. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 1977. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76227.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

DesGranges J-. Interactions among resident and migrant hummingbirds in Mexico. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 1977. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76227.pdf


McGill University

3. Brown, Roderick Neil. Singing behavior and ecology of two species of wrens.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 1977, McGill University

Subjects/Keywords: Wrens.; Birds  – Mexico.

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APA (6th Edition):

Brown, R. N. (1977). Singing behavior and ecology of two species of wrens. (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76223.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Roderick Neil. “Singing behavior and ecology of two species of wrens.” 1977. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76223.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Roderick Neil. “Singing behavior and ecology of two species of wrens.” 1977. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Brown RN. Singing behavior and ecology of two species of wrens. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 1977. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76223.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown RN. Singing behavior and ecology of two species of wrens. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 1977. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76223.pdf


McGill University

4. Montgomerie, Robert Dennis. [The] Energetics of foraging and competition in some Mexican hummingbirds.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 1978, McGill University

Note:

During 14 months at San BIas, Nayarit, Mexico, 1 studied the energy èconomlcs of foraging hummingbirds. Amazilia rutila and Cynanthus latirostris were always the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Hummingbirds.; Birds  – Mexico.

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APA (6th Edition):

Montgomerie, R. D. (1978). [The] Energetics of foraging and competition in some Mexican hummingbirds. (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile107477.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Montgomerie, Robert Dennis. “[The] Energetics of foraging and competition in some Mexican hummingbirds.” 1978. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile107477.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Montgomerie, Robert Dennis. “[The] Energetics of foraging and competition in some Mexican hummingbirds.” 1978. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Montgomerie RD. [The] Energetics of foraging and competition in some Mexican hummingbirds. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 1978. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile107477.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Montgomerie RD. [The] Energetics of foraging and competition in some Mexican hummingbirds. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 1978. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile107477.pdf


University of Oklahoma

5. Pogue, Darrell Wayne. A multiscale analysis of factors influencing the distributions of birds in the southern Great Plains.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 1998, University of Oklahoma

 I evaluated the degree of fragmentation of habitats used by grassland and savanna bird species in a prairie landscape. Habitat fragmentation was estimated using perimeter-area… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Birds Geographical distribution.; Biology, Zoology.; Birds Habitat.; Birds Great Plains.; Biology, Ecology.

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APA (6th Edition):

Pogue, D. W. (1998). A multiscale analysis of factors influencing the distributions of birds in the southern Great Plains. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5611

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pogue, Darrell Wayne. “A multiscale analysis of factors influencing the distributions of birds in the southern Great Plains.” 1998. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5611.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pogue, Darrell Wayne. “A multiscale analysis of factors influencing the distributions of birds in the southern Great Plains.” 1998. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Pogue DW. A multiscale analysis of factors influencing the distributions of birds in the southern Great Plains. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 1998. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5611.

Council of Science Editors:

Pogue DW. A multiscale analysis of factors influencing the distributions of birds in the southern Great Plains. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 1998. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5611


University of Oklahoma

6. Siegfried, Dennis G. Predicting breeding-bird occurrences in Oklahoma: Relationship of species distributions to land-cover and climatic variation.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 2007, University of Oklahoma

 It is of interest to evaluate abilities of techniques to predict species occurrences and species richness. I compared logistic regression and two forms of GARP… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Birds Geographical distribution.; Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Biostatistics.; Birds Oklahoma.

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APA (6th Edition):

Siegfried, D. G. (2007). Predicting breeding-bird occurrences in Oklahoma: Relationship of species distributions to land-cover and climatic variation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/1183

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Siegfried, Dennis G. “Predicting breeding-bird occurrences in Oklahoma: Relationship of species distributions to land-cover and climatic variation.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/1183.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Siegfried, Dennis G. “Predicting breeding-bird occurrences in Oklahoma: Relationship of species distributions to land-cover and climatic variation.” 2007. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Siegfried DG. Predicting breeding-bird occurrences in Oklahoma: Relationship of species distributions to land-cover and climatic variation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/1183.

Council of Science Editors:

Siegfried DG. Predicting breeding-bird occurrences in Oklahoma: Relationship of species distributions to land-cover and climatic variation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/1183


McGill University

7. Arnason, Einar. Ecology and feeding behaviour of the Arctic Skua (Stercorarius parasiticus Linnaeus) in Iceland.

Degree: MS, Department of Biology, 1974, McGill University

Subjects/Keywords: Parasitic jaeger.; Birds  – Iceland.

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APA (6th Edition):

Arnason, E. (1974). Ecology and feeding behaviour of the Arctic Skua (Stercorarius parasiticus Linnaeus) in Iceland. (Masters Thesis). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile50409.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arnason, Einar. “Ecology and feeding behaviour of the Arctic Skua (Stercorarius parasiticus Linnaeus) in Iceland.” 1974. Masters Thesis, McGill University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile50409.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arnason, Einar. “Ecology and feeding behaviour of the Arctic Skua (Stercorarius parasiticus Linnaeus) in Iceland.” 1974. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Arnason E. Ecology and feeding behaviour of the Arctic Skua (Stercorarius parasiticus Linnaeus) in Iceland. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McGill University; 1974. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile50409.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Arnason E. Ecology and feeding behaviour of the Arctic Skua (Stercorarius parasiticus Linnaeus) in Iceland. [Masters Thesis]. McGill University; 1974. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile50409.pdf


McGill University

8. Boag, Peter T. Morphological variation in the Darwin's finches (Geospizinae) of Daphne Major Island, Galápagos.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 1981, McGill University

 A three year study on Daphne Major island, Galapagos, describes the ecology and morphology of a simple Geospiza community. The four part thesis discusses the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Finches  – Morphology.; Birds  – Galapagos Islands.

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APA (6th Edition):

Boag, P. T. (1981). Morphological variation in the Darwin's finches (Geospizinae) of Daphne Major Island, Galápagos. (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile77101.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boag, Peter T. “Morphological variation in the Darwin's finches (Geospizinae) of Daphne Major Island, Galápagos.” 1981. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile77101.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boag, Peter T. “Morphological variation in the Darwin's finches (Geospizinae) of Daphne Major Island, Galápagos.” 1981. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Boag PT. Morphological variation in the Darwin's finches (Geospizinae) of Daphne Major Island, Galápagos. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 1981. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile77101.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Boag PT. Morphological variation in the Darwin's finches (Geospizinae) of Daphne Major Island, Galápagos. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 1981. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile77101.pdf


McGill University

9. Ouellet, Henri. Biosystematics and ecology of Picoides villosus (L.) and P. pubescens (L.), (Aves : Picidae).

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 1977, McGill University

Subjects/Keywords: Woodpeckers.; Birds  – North America.

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APA (6th Edition):

Ouellet, H. (1977). Biosystematics and ecology of Picoides villosus (L.) and P. pubescens (L.), (Aves : Picidae). (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76664.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ouellet, Henri. “Biosystematics and ecology of Picoides villosus (L.) and P. pubescens (L.), (Aves : Picidae).” 1977. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76664.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ouellet, Henri. “Biosystematics and ecology of Picoides villosus (L.) and P. pubescens (L.), (Aves : Picidae).” 1977. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Ouellet H. Biosystematics and ecology of Picoides villosus (L.) and P. pubescens (L.), (Aves : Picidae). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 1977. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76664.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Ouellet H. Biosystematics and ecology of Picoides villosus (L.) and P. pubescens (L.), (Aves : Picidae). [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 1977. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile76664.pdf


Georgia Southern University

10. McLain, Antarius D. Bird Window Strikes on a College Campus: Mortality Estimates and Possible Mitigation.

Degree: MSin Biology (M.S.), Department of Biology, 2019, Georgia Southern University

  Understanding the impact that human development has on wildlife populations is essential to preserving biodiversity. Bird populations are a good indicator of anthropogenic threats… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Window strikes; Bird mortality; Migratory birds; Carcass scavenging; Decomposition; Biodiversity; Biology; Ornithology

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APA (6th Edition):

McLain, A. D. (2019). Bird Window Strikes on a College Campus: Mortality Estimates and Possible Mitigation. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1975

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McLain, Antarius D. “Bird Window Strikes on a College Campus: Mortality Estimates and Possible Mitigation.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1975.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McLain, Antarius D. “Bird Window Strikes on a College Campus: Mortality Estimates and Possible Mitigation.” 2019. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

McLain AD. Bird Window Strikes on a College Campus: Mortality Estimates and Possible Mitigation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1975.

Council of Science Editors:

McLain AD. Bird Window Strikes on a College Campus: Mortality Estimates and Possible Mitigation. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1975


University of Oklahoma

11. Whitekiller, Robin Rae. Correlates of extra-pair paternity and the effects of ectoparasites on nestling growth, parental provisioning and reproductive success in the house sparrow.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biology, 2000, University of Oklahoma

 I used DNA fingerprinting to examine paternity in the House Sparrow and found that 20% of the offspring were attributable to extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs). I… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Birds Breeding.; English sparrow.; Biology, Zoology.; Biology, Ecology.

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APA (6th Edition):

Whitekiller, R. R. (2000). Correlates of extra-pair paternity and the effects of ectoparasites on nestling growth, parental provisioning and reproductive success in the house sparrow. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5990

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Whitekiller, Robin Rae. “Correlates of extra-pair paternity and the effects of ectoparasites on nestling growth, parental provisioning and reproductive success in the house sparrow.” 2000. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5990.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Whitekiller, Robin Rae. “Correlates of extra-pair paternity and the effects of ectoparasites on nestling growth, parental provisioning and reproductive success in the house sparrow.” 2000. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Whitekiller RR. Correlates of extra-pair paternity and the effects of ectoparasites on nestling growth, parental provisioning and reproductive success in the house sparrow. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2000. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5990.

Council of Science Editors:

Whitekiller RR. Correlates of extra-pair paternity and the effects of ectoparasites on nestling growth, parental provisioning and reproductive success in the house sparrow. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2000. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/5990


Georgia Southern University

12. Zimmerman, Jared Andrew. Habitat Relationships of Breeding Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Altamaha River, Georgia.

Degree: MSin Biology (M.S.), Department of Biology, 2010, Georgia Southern University

 Bottomland hardwood forests (bottomlands) dominate most of the river floodplains and lowlands of the southeastern United States. These vanishing and often degraded forests provide habitat… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ETD; Breeding birds; Neotropical migratory birds; Conservation; Bottomland hardwood forests; Habitat associations; Altamaha River; Point counts; Forest management; Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies, Electronic Theses & Dissertations, ETDs, Student Research

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APA (6th Edition):

Zimmerman, J. A. (2010). Habitat Relationships of Breeding Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Altamaha River, Georgia. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/748

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zimmerman, Jared Andrew. “Habitat Relationships of Breeding Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Altamaha River, Georgia.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/748.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zimmerman, Jared Andrew. “Habitat Relationships of Breeding Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Altamaha River, Georgia.” 2010. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Zimmerman JA. Habitat Relationships of Breeding Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Altamaha River, Georgia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/748.

Council of Science Editors:

Zimmerman JA. Habitat Relationships of Breeding Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Altamaha River, Georgia. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2010. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/748


Western Kentucky University

13. Pauly, James. Sunset as an Orientational Cue for a Nocturnal Migrant, the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis).

Degree: MS, Department of Biology, 1982, Western Kentucky University

  The possibility that nocturnal migrants use sunset as an orientational cue was explored in the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) between 1 April and 24… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Western Kentucky University; Birds; Migration; Ornithology; Animal Sciences; Biology; Life Sciences; Poultry or Avian Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Pauly, J. (1982). Sunset as an Orientational Cue for a Nocturnal Migrant, the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis). (Masters Thesis). Western Kentucky University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1823

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pauly, James. “Sunset as an Orientational Cue for a Nocturnal Migrant, the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis).” 1982. Masters Thesis, Western Kentucky University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1823.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pauly, James. “Sunset as an Orientational Cue for a Nocturnal Migrant, the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis).” 1982. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Pauly J. Sunset as an Orientational Cue for a Nocturnal Migrant, the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Kentucky University; 1982. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1823.

Council of Science Editors:

Pauly J. Sunset as an Orientational Cue for a Nocturnal Migrant, the White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis). [Masters Thesis]. Western Kentucky University; 1982. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1823


Western Kentucky University

14. Twedt, Daniel. The Influence of Livestock Feed Size on Feed Consumption by Starlings (Sturnus Vulgaris).

Degree: MS, Department of Biology, 1982, Western Kentucky University

  Ground meal and 4 sizes of pelleted feeds (3/16, ¼, 3/8 and ½ inch diameters) were offered to captive Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris, Linnaeus) to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Western Kentucky University; Birds; Ornithology; Animal Sciences; Biology; Life Sciences; Poultry or Avian Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Twedt, D. (1982). The Influence of Livestock Feed Size on Feed Consumption by Starlings (Sturnus Vulgaris). (Masters Thesis). Western Kentucky University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1824

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Twedt, Daniel. “The Influence of Livestock Feed Size on Feed Consumption by Starlings (Sturnus Vulgaris).” 1982. Masters Thesis, Western Kentucky University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1824.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Twedt, Daniel. “The Influence of Livestock Feed Size on Feed Consumption by Starlings (Sturnus Vulgaris).” 1982. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Twedt D. The Influence of Livestock Feed Size on Feed Consumption by Starlings (Sturnus Vulgaris). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Kentucky University; 1982. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1824.

Council of Science Editors:

Twedt D. The Influence of Livestock Feed Size on Feed Consumption by Starlings (Sturnus Vulgaris). [Masters Thesis]. Western Kentucky University; 1982. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1824


Kansas State University

15. Johnson, Tracey N. Ecological restoration of tallgrass prairie: grazing management benefits plant and bird communities in upland and riparian habitats.

Degree: MS, Department of Biology, 2006, Kansas State University

 Cattle-grazing is a dominant land use in the United States, with more than 300 million hectares of land grazed each year. The habitat changes facilitated… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ecological restoration; Grassland birds; Grazing; Riparian; Mark-recapture; Agriculture, Agronomy (0285); Biology, Ecology (0329)

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, T. N. (2006). Ecological restoration of tallgrass prairie: grazing management benefits plant and bird communities in upland and riparian habitats. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/190

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Tracey N. “Ecological restoration of tallgrass prairie: grazing management benefits plant and bird communities in upland and riparian habitats.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/190.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Tracey N. “Ecological restoration of tallgrass prairie: grazing management benefits plant and bird communities in upland and riparian habitats.” 2006. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson TN. Ecological restoration of tallgrass prairie: grazing management benefits plant and bird communities in upland and riparian habitats. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2006. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/190.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson TN. Ecological restoration of tallgrass prairie: grazing management benefits plant and bird communities in upland and riparian habitats. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/190


Georgia Southern University

16. Kinsey, Andrew Allen. Temporal and Spatial Variation in Abundance of Migratory Birds at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia.

Degree: MS, Department of Biology, 1999, Georgia Southern University

  Migratory birds spend a significant part of each year in transition between their breeding and resting grounds. During this transitional period migrants rely on… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ETD; Migratory birds; Stopover work; Passerines; North America; Coastal migration routes; Inland stopover sites; Kennesaw Mountain; Georgia; Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology; Biology; Legacy ETDs

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APA (6th Edition):

Kinsey, A. A. (1999). Temporal and Spatial Variation in Abundance of Migratory Birds at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd_legacy/920

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinsey, Andrew Allen. “Temporal and Spatial Variation in Abundance of Migratory Birds at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia.” 1999. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd_legacy/920.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinsey, Andrew Allen. “Temporal and Spatial Variation in Abundance of Migratory Birds at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia.” 1999. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kinsey AA. Temporal and Spatial Variation in Abundance of Migratory Birds at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 1999. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd_legacy/920.

Council of Science Editors:

Kinsey AA. Temporal and Spatial Variation in Abundance of Migratory Birds at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 1999. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd_legacy/920

17. Mowbray, Rachel E. Foraging Ecology of a Winter Bird Community in Southeastern Georgia.

Degree: MSin Biology (M.S.), Department of Biology, 2018, Georgia Southern University

  Classical views on community structure emphasized deterministic processes and the importance of competition in shaping communities. However, the processes responsible for shaping avian communities… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Avian ecology; Competitive exclusion principle; Niche partitioning; Winter communities; Migratory birds; Foraging behaviors; Behavior and Ethology; Population Biology

…of migratory birds on resident species 14 Figure 2. PCO plot of bird community of… …He also found that birds of prey partitioned resources by favoring different prey 10… …insectivorous birds found foraging in the same habitat and even the same trees during the breeding… …relatively few permanent residents (Meltofte 2013). Migratory birds arrive to their… …x29;. However, in temperate and tropical regions the presence of resident birds makes… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mowbray, R. E. (2018). Foraging Ecology of a Winter Bird Community in Southeastern Georgia. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1861

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mowbray, Rachel E. “Foraging Ecology of a Winter Bird Community in Southeastern Georgia.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1861.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mowbray, Rachel E. “Foraging Ecology of a Winter Bird Community in Southeastern Georgia.” 2018. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Mowbray RE. Foraging Ecology of a Winter Bird Community in Southeastern Georgia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1861.

Council of Science Editors:

Mowbray RE. Foraging Ecology of a Winter Bird Community in Southeastern Georgia. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1861


Georgia Southern University

18. Wetzel, Daniel Paul. Parental Investment and Male Ornamentation in the Eastern Bluebird (Sialis Sialis).

Degree: MSin Biology (M.S.), Department of Biology, 2006, Georgia Southern University

 Bright plumage coloration in most birds is thought to be a product of sexual selection. Brighter, more-ornamented males are preferred by females because their plumage… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ETD; Parental investment; Sexual selection; Structural coloration; Nest defense; Eastern Bluebird; Sialia sialis 2; Birds; Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies, Electronic Theses & Dissertations, ETDs, Student Research

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APA (6th Edition):

Wetzel, D. P. (2006). Parental Investment and Male Ornamentation in the Eastern Bluebird (Sialis Sialis). (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/711

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wetzel, Daniel Paul. “Parental Investment and Male Ornamentation in the Eastern Bluebird (Sialis Sialis).” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/711.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wetzel, Daniel Paul. “Parental Investment and Male Ornamentation in the Eastern Bluebird (Sialis Sialis).” 2006. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Wetzel DP. Parental Investment and Male Ornamentation in the Eastern Bluebird (Sialis Sialis). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2006. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/711.

Council of Science Editors:

Wetzel DP. Parental Investment and Male Ornamentation in the Eastern Bluebird (Sialis Sialis). [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2006. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/711

19. Dlugolecki, Lisa. Bird Use of Cumberland Island's Freshwater Wetlands.

Degree: MSin Biology (M.S.), Department of Biology, 2012, Georgia Southern University

  Cumberland Island is the southernmost barrier island off the coast of Georgia. Its freshwater wetlands are an important, rare habitat to have on a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ETD; Freshwater wetlands; Birds; Cumberland Island; Diversification; Biology; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies, Electronic Theses & Dissertations, ETDs, Student Research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dlugolecki, L. (2012). Bird Use of Cumberland Island's Freshwater Wetlands. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/12

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dlugolecki, Lisa. “Bird Use of Cumberland Island's Freshwater Wetlands.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/12.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dlugolecki, Lisa. “Bird Use of Cumberland Island's Freshwater Wetlands.” 2012. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Dlugolecki L. Bird Use of Cumberland Island's Freshwater Wetlands. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/12.

Council of Science Editors:

Dlugolecki L. Bird Use of Cumberland Island's Freshwater Wetlands. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2012. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/12

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