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You searched for subject:(Biomedical NLP). Showing records 1 – 5 of 5 total matches.

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UCLA

1. Speier, William Farran. Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems.

Degree: Biomedical Engineering, 2015, UCLA

 The ability to communicate using language is a fundamental human function. When this ability is compromised, as it can be in neuromuscular diseases such as… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical engineering; ALS; Brain Computer Interface; EEG; Language Models; NLP; Signal Analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Speier, W. F. (2015). Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8j79w06v

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Speier, William Farran. “Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems.” 2015. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8j79w06v.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Speier, William Farran. “Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems.” 2015. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Speier WF. Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2015. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8j79w06v.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Speier WF. Toward real-time communication using brain-computer interface systems. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2015. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/8j79w06v

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Crichton, Gamal Kashaka Omari. Improving Automated Literature-based Discovery with Neural Networks: Neural biomedical Named Entity Recognition, Link Prediction and Discovery.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Cambridge

 Literature-based Discovery (LBD) uses information from explicit statements in literature to generate new or unstated knowledge. Automated LBD can thus facilitate hypothesis testing and generation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Literature-based Discovery; LBD; Neural networks; Named Entity Recognition; NER; Multi-task Learning; LION LBD; knowledge discovery; Natural Language Processing; NLP; Machine Learning; Deep Learning; Biomedical NLP; Biomedical Knowledge Discovery; Link Predcition; Language Technology Laboratory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crichton, G. K. O. (2019). Improving Automated Literature-based Discovery with Neural Networks: Neural biomedical Named Entity Recognition, Link Prediction and Discovery. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crichton, Gamal Kashaka Omari. “Improving Automated Literature-based Discovery with Neural Networks: Neural biomedical Named Entity Recognition, Link Prediction and Discovery.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed August 05, 2020. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crichton, Gamal Kashaka Omari. “Improving Automated Literature-based Discovery with Neural Networks: Neural biomedical Named Entity Recognition, Link Prediction and Discovery.” 2019. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Crichton GKO. Improving Automated Literature-based Discovery with Neural Networks: Neural biomedical Named Entity Recognition, Link Prediction and Discovery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886.

Council of Science Editors:

Crichton GKO. Improving Automated Literature-based Discovery with Neural Networks: Neural biomedical Named Entity Recognition, Link Prediction and Discovery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886


University of Cambridge

3. Crichton, Gamal Kashaka Omari. Improving automated literature-based discovery with neural networks : neural biomedical named entity recognition, link prediction and discovery.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Cambridge

 Literature-based Discovery (LBD) uses information from explicit statements in literature to generate new or unstated knowledge. Automated LBD can thus facilitate hypothesis testing and generation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Literature-based Discovery; LBD; Neural networks; Named Entity Recognition; NER; Multi-task Learning; LION LBD; knowledge discovery; Natural Language Processing; NLP; Machine Learning; Deep Learning; Biomedical NLP; Biomedical Knowledge Discovery; Link Predcition; Language Technology Laboratory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crichton, G. K. O. (2019). Improving automated literature-based discovery with neural networks : neural biomedical named entity recognition, link prediction and discovery. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.782841

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crichton, Gamal Kashaka Omari. “Improving automated literature-based discovery with neural networks : neural biomedical named entity recognition, link prediction and discovery.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed August 05, 2020. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.782841.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crichton, Gamal Kashaka Omari. “Improving automated literature-based discovery with neural networks : neural biomedical named entity recognition, link prediction and discovery.” 2019. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Crichton GKO. Improving automated literature-based discovery with neural networks : neural biomedical named entity recognition, link prediction and discovery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.782841.

Council of Science Editors:

Crichton GKO. Improving automated literature-based discovery with neural networks : neural biomedical named entity recognition, link prediction and discovery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293886 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.782841

4. ZUO LI. Recognition of transcription factor interactions based on NLP and artificial intelligence.

Degree: 2004, National University of Singapore

Subjects/Keywords: transcription factor; transcription factor relations; text-mining; biomedical text; NLP; database

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

LI, Z. (2004). Recognition of transcription factor interactions based on NLP and artificial intelligence. (Thesis). National University of Singapore. Retrieved from http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27709

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

LI, ZUO. “Recognition of transcription factor interactions based on NLP and artificial intelligence.” 2004. Thesis, National University of Singapore. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27709.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

LI, ZUO. “Recognition of transcription factor interactions based on NLP and artificial intelligence.” 2004. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

LI Z. Recognition of transcription factor interactions based on NLP and artificial intelligence. [Internet] [Thesis]. National University of Singapore; 2004. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27709.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

LI Z. Recognition of transcription factor interactions based on NLP and artificial intelligence. [Thesis]. National University of Singapore; 2004. Available from: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27709

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

5. Barrett, Neil. Natural language processing techniques for the purpose of sentinel event information extraction.

Degree: Dept. of Computer Science, 2012, University of Victoria

 An approach to biomedical language processing is to apply existing natural language processing (NLP) solutions to biomedical texts. Often, existing NLP solutions are less successful… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: natural language processing; medical language processing; biomedical language processing; sentinel event; clinical documents; NLP; MLP; CLU; clinical language processing

…141 144 145 147 149 8 Conclusions and future work 150 8.1 Biomedical NLP difficulties… …sounds to semantics.1 NLP may be applied to biomedical texts. Biomedical texts are biological… …biomedical NLP2 is to apply existing NLP solutions to biomedical texts such as clinical letters… …Often, existing NLP solutions are less successful in the biomedical domain relative to their… …assuming non-biomedical domain input. Biomedical NLP is likely best served by methods… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barrett, N. (2012). Natural language processing techniques for the purpose of sentinel event information extraction. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4320

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barrett, Neil. “Natural language processing techniques for the purpose of sentinel event information extraction.” 2012. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4320.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barrett, Neil. “Natural language processing techniques for the purpose of sentinel event information extraction.” 2012. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Barrett N. Natural language processing techniques for the purpose of sentinel event information extraction. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4320.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Barrett N. Natural language processing techniques for the purpose of sentinel event information extraction. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4320

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.