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You searched for subject:(Biodiversity conservation San Luis Valley Colo AND N M ). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Torres, Glenda A. Comparative analysis of plant species diversity in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Applied Natural Science, 2018, Colorado State University – Pueblo

The concept of species diversity in an ecosystem is often used in the determination of ecosystem health. Statements have been made and it is generally assumed among professionals who evaluate rangelands that healthy rangeland areas have a greater diversity than unhealthy areas. Similar assumptions about riparian areas have also been made. It is not clear whether or not they are referring to overall diversity including flora and fauna. This study focuses on plant diversity response in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas on Bureau of Land Management administered lands in the San Luis Valley. Data from 1975-2002 on forty-eight plots were analyzed for the range portion of this study, and baseline data collection began in 2002 began for twenty-five vegetation transects in riparian areas. Data collection methods for the rangeland transects included the Parker 3-Step Method, along with the Daubenmire Cover Frequency Method. A modified cover frequency method was developed and used to collect data in the riparian transects. Health determination of the range over the years was determined by calculating a trend index in this study. The Proper Functioning Condition Method was used to determine health in the riparian areas. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was completed to see if there was an overall difference in mean plant diversity in healthy and unhealthy rangeland, and individual analyses were completed for each ecological range site in the study area. An ANOVA was also completed on the riparian data. In conclusion, there was no statistically significant difference in mean plant diversity in healthy and unhealthy range over all, nor was there any statistically significant difference in mean plant diversity in the individual ecological range sites. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean plant diversity in the riparian areas with diversity being higher in the non-functional, unhealthy riparian areas. The influence of climate and rangeland health determinations should be among topics addressed in further studies in healthy and unhealthy riparian and range areas.

Subjects/Keywords: Biodiversity conservation  – San Luis Valley (Colo. and N. M.); Endangered ecosystems  – San Luis Valley (Colo. and N. M.); Riparian ecology  – San Luis Valley (Colo. and N. M.); Riparian plants  – San Luis Valley (Colo. and N. M.); Species diversity  – San Luis Valley (Colo. and N. M.)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Torres, G. A. (2018). Comparative analysis of plant species diversity in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University – Pueblo. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/187658

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Torres, Glenda A. “Comparative analysis of plant species diversity in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University – Pueblo. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/187658.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Torres, Glenda A. “Comparative analysis of plant species diversity in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas.” 2018. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Torres GA. Comparative analysis of plant species diversity in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University – Pueblo; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/187658.

Council of Science Editors:

Torres GA. Comparative analysis of plant species diversity in healthy and unhealthy range and riparian areas. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University – Pueblo; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/187658


Colorado State University

2. Yochum, Steven Edward. Flow resistance prediction in high-gradient streams.

Degree: PhD, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2007, Colorado State University

Flow resistance measurements were collected on high-gradient streams in the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado, for bankfull through low flows using Rhodamine WT dye tracing, ground-based LiDAR scans, and laser theodolite surveying of longitudinal profiles and below-water features. A dataset of 59 resistance measurements was collected on fifteen reaches with instream wood present in varying densities. Values of Manning's n ranged from 0.05 to 0.52, and Darcy-Weisbach ƒ varied from 0.28 to 56. All measurements indicated subcritical reach-average conditions, with Froude numbers ranging from 0.15 to 0.78. Relative grain submergence (R/D84) was a poor predictor of flow resistance while relative bedform submergence, defined as the ratio of depth or hydraulic radius to the standard deviation of the residuals of a bed profile regression (hm/σz, R σz), explained up to 76 and 80 percent of the variance of n and ƒ, respectively. Both clasts and instream wood contribute to bed variability; steps are heightened by wood lodging among the clast steps. Hence relative bedform submergence captures the combined influence of wood and clasts, which contribute both form and spill resistance. Relative bedform submergence is less effective for prediction in reaches with substantial non-step-forming instream wood and in steep channels. In the steepest reaches, with slopes over about 18 percent, the data indicate a shift towards a skimming regime with a partial submergence of bedforms and a threshold reduction in flow resistance. Three-dimensional measures of geometric variability were explored, to assess the correlation of flow resistance with higher-order spatial variation due to composite effects of bedforms, large clasts, and instream wood. With the exclusion of bank effects, a normalized variable (ha3/σz3) explained 77 and 81 percent of the variance of n and ƒ, respectively. Multivariate regression models with variables describing bedforms, bankforms, and instream wood explained 87 percent of the variance of n and ƒ. On average, flow resistance due to bedforms (form and spill) are the greatest contributor to overall flow resistance in these high-gradient streams, followed by form resistance generated by bankforms, and lastly, by form resistance induced by non-step instream wood. Advisors/Committee Members: Bledsoe, Brian P. (advisor), Rathburn, Sara L., 1962- (committee member), Watson, Chester C. (committee member), Wohl, Ellen E., 1962- (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: velocity; step pool; Manning's n; flow resistance; Darcy-Weisbach ƒ; cascade; Streamflow  – Colorado  – Fraser Experimental Forest; Stream measurements  – Colorado  – Fraser Experimental Forest; Channels (Hydraulic engineering)  – Colorado  – Fraser Experimental Forest; Frictional resistance (Hydrodynamics)  – Colorado  – Fraser Experimental Forest; Cascades (Fluid dynamics)  – Colorado  – Fraser Experimental Forest; Fraser Experimental Forest (Colo.)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yochum, S. E. (2007). Flow resistance prediction in high-gradient streams. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/88342

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yochum, Steven Edward. “Flow resistance prediction in high-gradient streams.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/88342.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yochum, Steven Edward. “Flow resistance prediction in high-gradient streams.” 2007. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Yochum SE. Flow resistance prediction in high-gradient streams. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/88342.

Council of Science Editors:

Yochum SE. Flow resistance prediction in high-gradient streams. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/88342

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