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You searched for subject:(Bi literacy). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Loyola University Chicago

1. Griskell, Holly. Assessing English Language Learners' Motivation to Participate in Classroom Discussion.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2018, Loyola University Chicago

This study assesses sixth-grade Spanish-speaking English Language Learners' (ELLs'; m age = 12.15 years old) participation and motivation to participate in classroom discussion through developing a 20-item measure, the Motivation for Classroom Discussion Questionnaire (MCD-Q) (Study 1 n = 258). We examined the relation between ELLs' bi-literacy and MCD-Q scores as well as amount of talk during discussion, measured by audio-recordings of their English Language Arts class (Study 2 n = 149). Study 1 findings indicated that the MCD-Q items cohered into five motivational constructs (value, language-efficacy, extrinsic motivation, social motivation, and interest). Study 2 findings showed the MCD-Q's predictive validity. Specifically, bi-literate ELLs who reported high levels of motivation to participate in classroom discussion were more likely to engage in classroom discussion than were their less bi-literate and less motivated counterparts.

Subjects/Keywords: Bi-literacy; Classroom discussion; English Language Learners; Motivation; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Griskell, H. (2018). Assessing English Language Learners' Motivation to Participate in Classroom Discussion. (Thesis). Loyola University Chicago. Retrieved from https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3675

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Griskell, Holly. “Assessing English Language Learners' Motivation to Participate in Classroom Discussion.” 2018. Thesis, Loyola University Chicago. Accessed July 21, 2019. https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3675.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Griskell, Holly. “Assessing English Language Learners' Motivation to Participate in Classroom Discussion.” 2018. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Griskell H. Assessing English Language Learners' Motivation to Participate in Classroom Discussion. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loyola University Chicago; 2018. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3675.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Griskell H. Assessing English Language Learners' Motivation to Participate in Classroom Discussion. [Thesis]. Loyola University Chicago; 2018. Available from: https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3675

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Nzomo, Peggy I. Multilingual Information Access: Practices and Perceptions of Bi/multilingual Academic Users.

Degree: 2015, University of Western Ontario

The research reported in this dissertation explored linguistic determinants in online information searching, and examined to what extent bi/multilingual academic users utilize Multilingual Information Access (MLIA) tools and what impact these have on their information searching behavior. The aim of the study was three-pronged: to provide tangible data that can support recommendations for the effective user-centered design of Multilingual Information Retrieval (MLIR) systems; to provide a user-centered evaluation of existing MLIA tools, and to offer the basis of a framework for Library & Information Science (LIS) professionals in teaching information literacy and library skills for bi/multilingual academic users. In the first phase of the study, 250 bi/multilingual students participated in a web survey that investigated their language choices while searching for information on the internet and electronic databases. 31 of these participants took part in the second phase which involved a controlled lab-based user experiment and post experiment questionnaire that investigated their use of MLIA tools on Google and WorldCat and their opinions of these tools. In the third phase, 19 students participated in focus groups discussions and 6 librarians were interviewed to find out their perspectives on multilingual information literacy. Results showed that though machine translation has alleviated some of the linguistic related challenges in online information searching, language barriers do still exist for some users especially at the query formulation stage. Captures from the experiment revealed great diversity in the way MLIA tools were utilized while the focus group discussions and interviews revealed a general lack of awareness by both librarians and students of the tools that could help enhance and promote multilingual information literacy. The study highlights the roles of both IR system designers as well as LIS professionals in enhancing and promoting multilingual information access and literacy: User- centered design, user-modeling were found to be key aspects in the development of more effective multilingual information retrieval (MLIR) systems. The study also highlights the distinction between being multilingually information literate and being multilingual information literate. Suitable models for instruction for bi/multilingual academic users point towards Specialized Information Literacy Instruction (SILI) and Personalized Information Literacy Instruction (PILI).

Subjects/Keywords: Multilingual Information Access (MLIA); Information searching behavior; Multilingual Information Retrieval (MLIR); Multilingual Information Literacy (MLIL); Information Literacy Instruction; experiment; web survey; focus group discussions; interviews; bi/multilingual students.; Library and Information Science

bi/multilingual academic users €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦.47 3.1 Introduction €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦β€¦47… …Google and WorldCat: Bi/multilingual students’ experience and perceptions €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦β€¦81 4.1… …132 Chapter 5: Multilingual Information Literacy (MLIL): Students’ and Librarians… …Multilingualism €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦138 5.1.2 Information literacy €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦.139 5.2… …source €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦ €¦β€¦.....67 Figure 3.7: Linguistic help needed by bi/Multilingual students… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nzomo, P. I. (2015). Multilingual Information Access: Practices and Perceptions of Bi/multilingual Academic Users. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2812

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nzomo, Peggy I. “Multilingual Information Access: Practices and Perceptions of Bi/multilingual Academic Users.” 2015. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed July 21, 2019. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2812.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nzomo, Peggy I. “Multilingual Information Access: Practices and Perceptions of Bi/multilingual Academic Users.” 2015. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Nzomo PI. Multilingual Information Access: Practices and Perceptions of Bi/multilingual Academic Users. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2812.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nzomo PI. Multilingual Information Access: Practices and Perceptions of Bi/multilingual Academic Users. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2015. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2812

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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