Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Benjamin Tillman). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Clemson University

1. Mauldin, Sally. Sons of Dear Old Clemson: An Examination of Clemson University's Most Influential Founding Fathers.

Degree: MA, History, 2015, Clemson University

This thesis is designed to determine the roles played by three different men in the founding of the Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina: Thomas Green Clemson, Richard Wright Simpson, and Benjamin Ryan Tillman. It examines primary sources generated by each man and attempts to reconstruct the events of the fall of 1886 through 1918 to validate the claims of Simpson and Tillman of their roles in realizing Clemson’s dream of founding an agricultural and mechanical college following Clemson’s death in 1888. Each played a vital role in the founding and establishment of Clemson College and derived much personal satisfaction from their parts in the school’s existence. Tillman has traditionally been credited with the founding of Clemson University due to his involvement in the passage of the Act of Acceptance while other equally important individuals, particularly Simpson, have been largely ignored in favor of Tillman and his personal version of events. This work attempts to find the truth and properly recognize the actions and accomplishments of each man. This study also serves to explicate the related historiography to better understand how memory choices made in the years following Tillman’s death in 1918 have influenced popular recollections of the founding and early years of Clemson College. While prevalent thought in the Clemson community teaches that Clemson University would not exist without Ben Tillman, this is, in my view, only a partial truth. In reality, Clemson University owes its founding and survival to several individuals, chief among them Thomas Green Clemson as the benefactor, Richard Wright Simpson as the brilliant legal scholar, and Benjamin Ryan Tillman as the enthusiastic advocate. Without any of the three, Clemson University would not exist as it is known today. Advisors/Committee Members: Grubb, Alan, Andrew, Rod, Grant, Roger.

Subjects/Keywords: Act of Acceptance; Benjamin Tillman; Clemson University; Richard Simpson; Thomas Green Clemson; History

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mauldin, S. (2015). Sons of Dear Old Clemson: An Examination of Clemson University's Most Influential Founding Fathers. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2294

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mauldin, Sally. “Sons of Dear Old Clemson: An Examination of Clemson University's Most Influential Founding Fathers.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed October 23, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2294.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mauldin, Sally. “Sons of Dear Old Clemson: An Examination of Clemson University's Most Influential Founding Fathers.” 2015. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mauldin S. Sons of Dear Old Clemson: An Examination of Clemson University's Most Influential Founding Fathers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2294.

Council of Science Editors:

Mauldin S. Sons of Dear Old Clemson: An Examination of Clemson University's Most Influential Founding Fathers. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2015. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2294


University of Georgia

2. Krause, Kevin Michael. A different state of mind: Ben Tillman and the transformation of state government in South Carolina, 1885-1895.

Degree: PhD, History, 2014, University of Georgia

This dissertation examines Benjamin Ryan Tillman’s political activity in the late 1880s, and governorship in South Carolina from 1890 to 1894. While many historians have focused primarily on Tillman’s white supremacy and class-based demagoguery, this project, through a series of case studies focusing on prominent political issues, suggests that Tillman’s administration understood the role of state government in a dramatically different manner than his Conservative, or “Bourbon,” predecessors, who exhibited reluctance to employ the power of state in most cases. Where Conservatives preferred a minimalist state and elite rule, Tillman and his lieutenants attempted to bolster the power of the state government to empower white agricultural “producers.” The chapters include analyses of the agricultural college debate, reforms to the penitentiary and lunatic asylum, governmental approaches to railroad and phosphate monopolies, the state alcohol dispensary, and the constitutional disfranchisement of African Americans. Despite the reality that many of Tillman’s objectives were not realized by his vision of a sovereign and active state government—such as widespread landownership and prosperity for white, small farmers—his overall philosophy of the active and energetic state, which was in line with many Progressive-era conceptions of government, is worth taking seriously. Advisors/Committee Members: Stephen Berry.

Subjects/Keywords: Benjamin Ryan Tillman; South Carolina; Disfranchisement; Prohibition; Dispensary; Railroad Regulation; Monopoly; State Government; Conservative; Wade Hampton; Phosphate; Southern Race Relations; Producerism; Reform; Clemson College; Agriculture

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Krause, K. M. (2014). A different state of mind: Ben Tillman and the transformation of state government in South Carolina, 1885-1895. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/krause_kevin_m_201412_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Krause, Kevin Michael. “A different state of mind: Ben Tillman and the transformation of state government in South Carolina, 1885-1895.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/krause_kevin_m_201412_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Krause, Kevin Michael. “A different state of mind: Ben Tillman and the transformation of state government in South Carolina, 1885-1895.” 2014. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Krause KM. A different state of mind: Ben Tillman and the transformation of state government in South Carolina, 1885-1895. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/krause_kevin_m_201412_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Krause KM. A different state of mind: Ben Tillman and the transformation of state government in South Carolina, 1885-1895. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/krause_kevin_m_201412_phd

.