Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Bebe Moore). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Temple University

1. Harwell, Raena Jamila. This Woman's Work: The Sociopolitical Activism of Bebe Moore Campbell.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

African American Studies

In November 2006, award-winning novelist, Bebe Moore Campbell died at the age of 56 after a short battle with brain cancer. Although the author was widely-known and acclaimed for her first novel, Your Blues Ain't Like Mine (1992) there had been no serious study of her life, nor her literary and activist work. This dissertation examines Campbell's activism in two periods: as a student at the University of Pittsburgh during the 1960s Black Student Movement, and later as a mental health advocate near the end of her life in 2006. It also analyzes Campbell's first and final novels, Your Blues Ain't Like Mine and 72 Hour Hold (2005) and the direct relationship between her novels and her activist work. Oral history interview, primary source document analysis, and textual analysis of the two novels, were employed to examine and reconstruct Campbell's activist activities, approaches, intentions and impact in both her work as a student activist at the University of Pittsburgh and her work as a mental health advocate and spokesperson for the National Alliance for Mental Illness. A key idea considered is the impact of her early activism and consciousness on her later activism, writing, and advocacy. I describe the subject's activism within the Black Action Society from 1967-1971 and her negotiation of the black nationalist ideologies espoused during the 1960s. Campbell's first novel Your Blues Ain't Like Mine and is correlated to her emerging political consciousness (specific to race and gender) and the concern for racial violence during the Black Liberation period. The examination of recurrent themes in Your Blues reveals a direct relationship to Campbell's activism at the University of Pittsburgh. I also document Campbell's later involvement in the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), her role as a national spokesperson, and the local activism that sparked the birth of the NAMI Urban-Los Angeles chapter, serving black and Latino communities (1999-2006). Campbell's final novel, 72 Hour Hold, is examined closely for its socio-political commentary and emphasis on mental health disparities, coping with mental illness, and advocacy in black communities. Campbell utilized recurring signature themes within each novel to theorize and connect popular audiences with African American historical memory and current sociopolitical issues. Drawing from social movement theories, I contend that Campbell's activism, writing, and intellectual development reflect the process of frame alignment. That is, through writing and other activist practices she effectively amplifies, extends, and transforms sociopolitical concerns specific to African American communities, effectively engaging a broad range of readers and constituents. By elucidating Campbell's formal and informal leadership roles within two social movement organizations and her deliberate use of writing as an activist tool, I conclude that in both activist periods Campbell's effective use of resources, personal charisma, and mobilizing strategies aided in…

Advisors/Committee Members: Norment, Nathaniel, Abarry, Abu Shardow, Smith, Valerie, Stanford, Maxwell, Alexander-Floyd, Nikol G. (Nikol Gertrude).

Subjects/Keywords: African American Studies; Women's Studies; Literature; Black Student Movement; Black Women's Activism; Campbell; Bebe Moore; Contemporary Activism; Mental Health Awareness; Popular Fiction

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harwell, R. J. (2011). This Woman's Work: The Sociopolitical Activism of Bebe Moore Campbell. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,138885

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harwell, Raena Jamila. “This Woman's Work: The Sociopolitical Activism of Bebe Moore Campbell.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,138885.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harwell, Raena Jamila. “This Woman's Work: The Sociopolitical Activism of Bebe Moore Campbell.” 2011. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Harwell RJ. This Woman's Work: The Sociopolitical Activism of Bebe Moore Campbell. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,138885.

Council of Science Editors:

Harwell RJ. This Woman's Work: The Sociopolitical Activism of Bebe Moore Campbell. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,138885

2. Akbar, Maisha Shabazz. Saving white face : lynching and counter-hegemonic lynching performances.

Degree: PhD, Communication Studies, 2007, University of Texas – Austin

"Saving White Face: Lynching and Counter Hegemonic Lynching Performances," examines American lynching as hegemonic performances constitutive of discursive and material practices that reinforce a cultural fiction, white supremacy. "Lynching studies" is identified as an interdisciplinary academic project that includes lynching history, analysis and (activist) cultural production. Among other approaches, "Saving White Face" uses psychoanalysis and ethnography to unmask lynching as a site where race- and gender-based identities originate. Lynching's "materialities," such as lynching photographs and souvenirs are examined as the bases of American consumer culture, especially as they relate to football and (the) O.J. Simpson (ordeal). This work also documents the production of my Chamber Theater adaptation of Bebe Moore Campbell's 1992 novel, Your Blues Ain't Like Mine (also entitled "Saving White Face"). I also contextualize this counter hegemonic performance as a lynching drama, as well as among radical black feminist activism and blues performance. As such, lynching is identified as an emergent performance practice which not only reinforces white identity, but lynched subjectivities, as well. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Omi Osun Joni L., 1955- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Lynching; White identity; Race identity; Gender identity; United States; Your blues ain't like mine; Bebe Moore Campbell; Black feminist activism; Lynching studies; Saving white face

…of Bebe Moore Campbell’s novel Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine 15 Elin Diamond, ed… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akbar, M. S. (2007). Saving white face : lynching and counter-hegemonic lynching performances. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/20983

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akbar, Maisha Shabazz. “Saving white face : lynching and counter-hegemonic lynching performances.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/20983.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akbar, Maisha Shabazz. “Saving white face : lynching and counter-hegemonic lynching performances.” 2007. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Akbar MS. Saving white face : lynching and counter-hegemonic lynching performances. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/20983.

Council of Science Editors:

Akbar MS. Saving white face : lynching and counter-hegemonic lynching performances. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/20983

.