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You searched for subject:(Bangalore Solid Waste). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Indian Institute of Science

1. Shwetmala, *. Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore.

Degree: 2016, Indian Institute of Science

Municipal solid waste (MSW) production has significantly increased in the rapidly urbanizing developing world and also changed composition with increased decomposable organic fraction in MSW (OFMSW) and plastics content. This has stressed the environment in many ways while city managers and citizens have responded with various technological and management solutions leading to a need for scientific, environmental, technological and sustainability assessments of the emerging problems. This sets the research agenda and framework for this study wherein the MSW generation, composition, processing and treatment methods, open dumping practices, environmental liability, natural degradation, sustainability issues etc. have been studied for the city of Bangalore as a model for such an emerging problem. Results show that MSW generation ranged from 0.1-0.4 kg/person/day and the OFMSW content was >80% emerging predominantly from fruit, vegetable and food wastes. About 10-15% of daily MSW generated appeared to be haphazardly dumped around the city in ~700 small to large dumps ranging from 10-6,500 m2 with potential for large GHG emissions. Their spread and characteristics were assessed for 3 consecutive years using a novel rapid survey method developed at IISc involving motorcycle borne student volunteer teams, GPS enabled locating, physical measurements and satellite image interpretations. Results indicated that dump sites were of three types, ephemeral small sized in the core area (303) functioning as transfer stations, medium sized ones in outer areas that were closed rapidly with construction debris and very soon inhabited with dwellings and the larger and longer duration dumps (2-3 years, 393) in the peripheral regions within 10 km from the city administrative boundary. This method was compared with physical measurement and satellite imaging and gave very high level of accuracy and is hence suggested for other cities as well. A smaller fraction of MSW is also dumped in open drains that lead to choking and flooding of 3 locations and this was studied with some detail. The environmental footprint of such dumps were assessed by theoretical and experimental on-site and off-site approaches and experimental results show low GHG (CH4) emissions and emission factors that was largely attributable to the shallow depth of dumps (~0.7 m) and its low pH. The decomposition rates were experimentally determined for open dump sites and drivers for decomposition monitored. By providing differential access to macro-fauna, meso-micro organisms and only soil contact in field scale experiments it was determined that the greatest loss in weight occurred primarily due to the rapid drying process that brings down decomposition within 6 days. During the early stages of decomposition, mostly micro with meso organisms are responsible and after 6 days, the moisture content falls below 60% making microbiological decomposition difficult and enabling other foraging organisms to take over. The weight loss (decay) could be patterned both on exponential… Advisors/Committee Members: Ramachandra, T V.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Biodegradation; Municipal Solid Waste Management; Solid Waste Management; Refuse and Refuse Disposal Biodegradation; Environmental Biotechnology; Urban Solid Waste Management; Municipal Solid Waste Management; Organic Fraction Municipal Solid Waste; Biomethanation; Biodegradation; Biodegradable Waste Management; Sustainable Waste Management System; Bangalore Solid Waste; Environmental Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shwetmala, *. (2016). Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore. (Thesis). Indian Institute of Science. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2005/2724

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shwetmala, *. “Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore.” 2016. Thesis, Indian Institute of Science. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2005/2724.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shwetmala, *. “Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore.” 2016. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Shwetmala *. Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore. [Internet] [Thesis]. Indian Institute of Science; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2005/2724.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shwetmala *. Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore. [Thesis]. Indian Institute of Science; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2005/2724

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Indian Institute of Science

2. Shwetmala, *. Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore.

Degree: 2016, Indian Institute of Science

Municipal solid waste (MSW) production has significantly increased in the rapidly urbanizing developing world and also changed composition with increased decomposable organic fraction in MSW (OFMSW) and plastics content. This has stressed the environment in many ways while city managers and citizens have responded with various technological and management solutions leading to a need for scientific, environmental, technological and sustainability assessments of the emerging problems. This sets the research agenda and framework for this study wherein the MSW generation, composition, processing and treatment methods, open dumping practices, environmental liability, natural degradation, sustainability issues etc. have been studied for the city of Bangalore as a model for such an emerging problem. Results show that MSW generation ranged from 0.1-0.4 kg/person/day and the OFMSW content was >80% emerging predominantly from fruit, vegetable and food wastes. About 10-15% of daily MSW generated appeared to be haphazardly dumped around the city in ~700 small to large dumps ranging from 10-6,500 m2 with potential for large GHG emissions. Their spread and characteristics were assessed for 3 consecutive years using a novel rapid survey method developed at IISc involving motorcycle borne student volunteer teams, GPS enabled locating, physical measurements and satellite image interpretations. Results indicated that dump sites were of three types, ephemeral small sized in the core area (303) functioning as transfer stations, medium sized ones in outer areas that were closed rapidly with construction debris and very soon inhabited with dwellings and the larger and longer duration dumps (2-3 years, 393) in the peripheral regions within 10 km from the city administrative boundary. This method was compared with physical measurement and satellite imaging and gave very high level of accuracy and is hence suggested for other cities as well. A smaller fraction of MSW is also dumped in open drains that lead to choking and flooding of 3 locations and this was studied with some detail. The environmental footprint of such dumps were assessed by theoretical and experimental on-site and off-site approaches and experimental results show low GHG (CH4) emissions and emission factors that was largely attributable to the shallow depth of dumps (~0.7 m) and its low pH. The decomposition rates were experimentally determined for open dump sites and drivers for decomposition monitored. By providing differential access to macro-fauna, meso-micro organisms and only soil contact in field scale experiments it was determined that the greatest loss in weight occurred primarily due to the rapid drying process that brings down decomposition within 6 days. During the early stages of decomposition, mostly micro with meso organisms are responsible and after 6 days, the moisture content falls below 60% making microbiological decomposition difficult and enabling other foraging organisms to take over. The weight loss (decay) could be patterned both on exponential… Advisors/Committee Members: Ramachandra, T V.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Biodegradation; Municipal Solid Waste Management; Solid Waste Management; Refuse and Refuse Disposal Biodegradation; Environmental Biotechnology; Urban Solid Waste Management; Municipal Solid Waste Management; Organic Fraction Municipal Solid Waste; Biomethanation; Biodegradation; Biodegradable Waste Management; Sustainable Waste Management System; Bangalore Solid Waste; Environmental Engineering

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shwetmala, *. (2016). Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore. (Thesis). Indian Institute of Science. Retrieved from http://etd.iisc.ernet.in/handle/2005/2724 ; http://etd.ncsi.iisc.ernet.in/abstracts/3549/G27807-Abs.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shwetmala, *. “Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore.” 2016. Thesis, Indian Institute of Science. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://etd.iisc.ernet.in/handle/2005/2724 ; http://etd.ncsi.iisc.ernet.in/abstracts/3549/G27807-Abs.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shwetmala, *. “Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore.” 2016. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Shwetmala *. Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore. [Internet] [Thesis]. Indian Institute of Science; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://etd.iisc.ernet.in/handle/2005/2724 ; http://etd.ncsi.iisc.ernet.in/abstracts/3549/G27807-Abs.pdf.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shwetmala *. Assessment of Environmental Issues And Biodegradation Aspects of Current MSW Practices of Developing Country Metropolises - A Case Study of Bangalore. [Thesis]. Indian Institute of Science; 2016. Available from: http://etd.iisc.ernet.in/handle/2005/2724 ; http://etd.ncsi.iisc.ernet.in/abstracts/3549/G27807-Abs.pdf

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Rengarajan, Nivedita. Municipal Solid Waste Management In India: Finding Sustainable Pathways For The City Of Bangalore.

Degree: MS, Sustainability, 2013, Arizona State University

During the months from June to November 2012, the city of Bangalore was faced with a serious solid waste management (SWM) crisis. In the wake of the upheaval, the state court declared source segregation to be mandatory. Yet, while the legislation was clear, the pathway towards a course of action for the transition was not clear and hence, Bangalore was stuck in a state of limbo. The objectives for this thesis spiraled organically from this crisis. The first objective was to examine the gaps in Bangalore's transition to a more sustainable SWM system. Six particular gaps were identified, which in essence, were opportunities to re-shape the system. The gaps identified included: conflicting political agendas, the exclusion of some key actors, and lack of adequate attention to cultural aspects, provision of appropriate incentives, protection of livelihoods and promotion of innovation. Opportunities were found in better incentivization of sustainable SWM goals, protecting livelihoods that depend on waste, enhancing innovation and endorsing local, context based SWM solutions. Building on this understanding of gaps, the second objective was to explore an innovative, local, bottom-up waste-management model called the Vellore Zero Waste Model, and assess its applicability to Bangalore. The adaptability of the model depended on several factors such as, willingness of actors to redefine their roles and change functions, ability of the municipality to assure quality and oversight, willingness of citizen to source segregate, and most importantly, the political will and collective action needed to ensure and sustain the transition. The role of communication as a vital component to facilitate productive stakeholder engagement and to promote role change was evident. Therefore, the third objective of the study was to explore how interpersonal competencies and communication strategies could be used as a tool to facilitate stakeholder engagement and encourage collective action. In addressing these objectives, India was compared with Austria because Austria is often cited as having some of the best SWM practices in the world and has high recycling rates to show for its reputation.

Subjects/Keywords: Sustainability; Urban planning; Environmental health; Bangalore India Vienna; Soild Waste Management in India; Solid Waste in Vienna; Solid Waste Management in Bangalore; Sustainable Solid Waste Management in India; Sustainable Waste Management

…study examines the current state of municipal solid waste management SWM systems in Bangalore… …111! vii ACRONYMS SWM - Solid Waste Management MSWM - Municipal Solid Waste… …Management WM - Waste Management ZWM - Zero Waste Management SLRM - Solid & Liquid… …77! x Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION The goals of solid waste management (SWM) are… …India is one such developing country where municipal solid waste management (MSWM)… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rengarajan, N. (2013). Municipal Solid Waste Management In India: Finding Sustainable Pathways For The City Of Bangalore. (Masters Thesis). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/18776

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rengarajan, Nivedita. “Municipal Solid Waste Management In India: Finding Sustainable Pathways For The City Of Bangalore.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Arizona State University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://repository.asu.edu/items/18776.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rengarajan, Nivedita. “Municipal Solid Waste Management In India: Finding Sustainable Pathways For The City Of Bangalore.” 2013. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Rengarajan N. Municipal Solid Waste Management In India: Finding Sustainable Pathways For The City Of Bangalore. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Arizona State University; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/18776.

Council of Science Editors:

Rengarajan N. Municipal Solid Waste Management In India: Finding Sustainable Pathways For The City Of Bangalore. [Masters Thesis]. Arizona State University; 2013. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/18776

.