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You searched for subject:(Bacillus anthracis Metabolism). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Dong, Shengli. Characterization of the oligosaccharides of B. anthracis exosporium.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Fatal systemic anthrax is caused by exposure to spores of Bacillus anthracis. The outermost layer of the B. anthracis spore is called the exosporium. It consists of a paracrystalline basal layer and an external hair-like nap. The filaments of the hair-like nap are primarily composed of the glycoprotein BclA. Our previous studies showed that a 715-Da tetrasaccharide and a 324-Da disaccharide are attached to BclA through GalNAc. We named the novel nonreducing terminal sugar of the 715-Da tetrasaccharide anthrose. We subsequently proposed a plausible anthrose biosynthetic pathway and identified a gene cluster of four continuous genes that appeared to encode anthrose biosynthetic enzymes. These genes, bas3322 to bas3319, encode an enoyl-CoA hydratase, a glycosyltransferase, an aminotransferase, and an O-acyltransferase. We devised a novel microhydrazinolysis procedure that greatly facilitated our studies of the oligosaccharides. We knew that the oligosaccharides were linked to BclA through GalNAc residues and we attempted to identify the gene that encoded the enzyme for GalNAc biosynthesis. We subsequently identified the gene, bas5304. We found it encodes a bifunctional UDP-Glu/GlcNAc 4-epimerase, which converts UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-GalNAc. Surprisingly, a Δbas5304 mutant still made oligosaccharides. However, monosaccharide analysis of oligosaccharides of the mutant revealed that GalNAc had been replaced by GlcNAc. Thus, while GalNAc appears to be the preferred amino sugar for the linkage of oligosaccharides to the BclA protein backbone, in its absence, GlcNAc can serve as a substitute linker. We also examined BclA oligosaccharides of mutant spores in which individual genes in anthrose operon had been deleted. Deletion of the first gene of the operon, bas3322, resulted in the production of abnormal pentasaccharides containing anthrose analogs. Deletion of either gene bas3320 or gene bas3319 resulted in the disappearance of the pentasaccharide and the appearance of a new tetrasaccharide with a nonreducing terminal 3-O-methyl rhamnose. Deletion of gene bas3321 resulted in BclA being substituted only with the trisaccharide, evidence that the gene encodes a dTDP-β-L-rhamnose α-1,3-L-rhamnosyl-transferase. To further confirm their roles in anthrose biosynthesis, we cloned and expressed three of the genes of the anthrose operon and experimentally demonstrated that the proteins exhibited the predicted activities.

1 online resource (xiii, 142 p.) : ill., digital, PDF file.

Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

Joint Health Sciences

exosporium glycoprotein oligosaccharides anthrose hydrazinolysis

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Pritchard, David G., Hollingshead, Susan K.<br>, Kearney, John F.<br>, Popov, Kirill M.<br>, Turnbough, Charles L..

Subjects/Keywords: Amino Sugars  – biosynthesis<; br>; Bacillus anthracis  – genetics<; br>; Bacillus anthracis  – metabolism<; br>; Bacterial Proteins  – metabolism<; br>; Carbohydrate Epimerases  – metabolism<; br>; Deoxyglucose  – analogs & derivatives<; br>; Glycoproteins<; br>; Oligosaccharides<; br>; Operon

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dong, S. (2010). Characterization of the oligosaccharides of B. anthracis exosporium. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1237

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dong, Shengli. “Characterization of the oligosaccharides of B. anthracis exosporium.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1237.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dong, Shengli. “Characterization of the oligosaccharides of B. anthracis exosporium.” 2010. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Dong S. Characterization of the oligosaccharides of B. anthracis exosporium. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1237.

Council of Science Editors:

Dong S. Characterization of the oligosaccharides of B. anthracis exosporium. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,1237


University of Missouri – Columbia

2. Thompson, Brian M. Amino-terminal sequences of the bacillus anthracis exosporium proteins BCLA and BCLB important for localization and attachment to the spore surface.

Degree: 2008, University of Missouri – Columbia

The exosporium is the outermost layer of the Bacillus anthracis spore. The predominant protein on the exosporium surface is BclA, a collagen-like glycoprotein. BclA is incorporated on the spore surface late in the B. anthracis sporulation pathway. A second collagen-like protein, BclB, has been shown to be surface exposed on anthrax spores. We have identified sequences near the N-terminus of the BclA and BclB glycoproteins responsible for the incorporation of these proteins into the exosporium layer of the spore and used these targeting domains to incorporate reporter fluorescent proteins onto the spore surface. The BclA and BclB proteins are expressed in the mother cell cytoplasm and become spore-associated in a two step process involving first association of the protein with the spore surface followed by attachment of the protein in a process that involves a proteolytic cleavage event. Protein domains associated with each of these events have been identified. This novel targeting system can be exploited to incorporate foreign proteins into the exosporium of B. anthracis resulting in the surface display of recombinant immunogens for use as a potential vaccine delivery system. Advisors/Committee Members: Stewart, George Cameron, 1953- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Exine; Bacillus anthracis  – Metabolism; Glycoproteins  – Metabolism; Bacterial spores  – Analysis; Cytoplasm  – Analysis; Recombinant proteins  – Metabolism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thompson, B. M. (2008). Amino-terminal sequences of the bacillus anthracis exosporium proteins BCLA and BCLB important for localization and attachment to the spore surface. (Thesis). University of Missouri – Columbia. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5700

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thompson, Brian M. “Amino-terminal sequences of the bacillus anthracis exosporium proteins BCLA and BCLB important for localization and attachment to the spore surface.” 2008. Thesis, University of Missouri – Columbia. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5700.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thompson, Brian M. “Amino-terminal sequences of the bacillus anthracis exosporium proteins BCLA and BCLB important for localization and attachment to the spore surface.” 2008. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Thompson BM. Amino-terminal sequences of the bacillus anthracis exosporium proteins BCLA and BCLB important for localization and attachment to the spore surface. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5700.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Thompson BM. Amino-terminal sequences of the bacillus anthracis exosporium proteins BCLA and BCLB important for localization and attachment to the spore surface. [Thesis]. University of Missouri – Columbia; 2008. Available from: https://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5700

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.