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You searched for subject:(Azuma Hiroki). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Portland State University

1. Burton, Benjamin Robert. The Revolution Will Not Be Politicized: Political Expression in the Manga Adaptations of Kanikōsen.

Degree: MA, World Languages and Literatures, 2017, Portland State University

Kobayashi Takiji's (1903-1933) Kanikōsen (The Crab Cannery Ship, 1929), the outstanding work from the proletarian literary movement, experienced an influx of new adaptations into various mediums during the years that preceded and followed the "Kanikōsen boom" of 2008. This thesis focuses on two manga adaptations that provide readers with starkly different takes on the original story. Using theories by Scott McCloud and Azuma Hiroki, I first attempt to draw parallels between the form of manga and that of the novel. Then, I examine the manner in which the most explicitly political content of the novel is adapted into the manga versions. Through this examination of form and content, it becomes apparent that, despite their differences, both adaptations reinforce a vague, individualist-humanist ideology that undermines the notions of class consciousness and class struggle that are central to the narrative of Kanikōsen. This diminishing of the explicitly "Red" aspects of the original reflects the Japanese public's general aversion to politics that has persisted since the early 1970's until this day. Advisors/Committee Members: Jon Holt.

Subjects/Keywords: Takiji Kobayashi (1903-1933). Kanikōsen; Scott McCloud (1960-)  – Criticism and interpretation; Hiroki Azuma (1971-)  – Criticism and interpretation; Comic books strips etc; Japanese political fiction; Japanese Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Burton, B. R. (2017). The Revolution Will Not Be Politicized: Political Expression in the Manga Adaptations of Kanikōsen. (Masters Thesis). Portland State University. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4157

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burton, Benjamin Robert. “The Revolution Will Not Be Politicized: Political Expression in the Manga Adaptations of Kanikōsen.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Portland State University. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4157.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burton, Benjamin Robert. “The Revolution Will Not Be Politicized: Political Expression in the Manga Adaptations of Kanikōsen.” 2017. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Burton BR. The Revolution Will Not Be Politicized: Political Expression in the Manga Adaptations of Kanikōsen. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Portland State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4157.

Council of Science Editors:

Burton BR. The Revolution Will Not Be Politicized: Political Expression in the Manga Adaptations of Kanikōsen. [Masters Thesis]. Portland State University; 2017. Available from: https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/open_access_etds/4157


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Raymond, Andrew Colin. Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art.

Degree: MA, Asian Studies, 2015, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This thesis examines Murakami Takashi’s Superflat theory and exhibition as well as the ramifications of its success. Developed through the 1990s and the early 2000s, Murakami’s Superflat theory attempts to prove a direct connection between the aesthetics of Edo period (1603-1868) and contemporary Japanese art. Murakami built his own production studio and branding devices as an attempt to further codify Superflat as a unique movement in Japanese art. As a result of Murakami’s tactics and the popularity of his theory in North America and Europe, many of his contemporaries are frequently analyzed through the lens of Superflat. Yet, the totalizing effect of the Superflat theory does disservice to the majority of Japanese contemporary artists whose work has very little in relation to Murakami’s pop aesthetic. To explore how Murakami achieved this result, this thesis first analyzes the art historical claims made in the Superflat theory. This is followed by an examination of the impetus for and contextualization of the creation of Superflat. As an example of the effect of Murakami’s discursive dominance over conversations of Japanese art in North America, the thesis concludes with an analysis of David Elliott’s 2011 Japan Society exhibition titled "Bye Bye Kiity!!! Between Heaven and Hell in Japanese Contemporary Art." The thesis concludes with the assertion that we must fundamentally re-evaluate the ways in which Japanese art is represented, particularly within the United States.

Subjects/Keywords: Murakami; Murakami Takashi; Superflat; Super Flat; Elliott; David Elliott; Little Boy; Bye Bye Kitty; Contemporary Japanese Art; Japanese Art; Aida; Aida Makoto; Ikeda; Ikeda Manabu; Nara; Nara Yoshitomo; Azuma; Azuma Hiroki; Sawaragi; Sawaragi Noi; Lyotard; Jean-François Lyotard; Orientalism; Postmodern Art; Danto; Arthur Danto; Japan Society; Curation; Anime; Manga; Favell; Adrian Favell; Kawaii; Neo pop; Neo-pop

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Raymond, A. C. (2015). Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88947

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raymond, Andrew Colin. “Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art.” 2015. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88947.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raymond, Andrew Colin. “Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Raymond AC. Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88947.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Raymond AC. Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88947

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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