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You searched for subject:(Australian Chinese Fiction). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Luo, Haizhi. Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912.

Degree: Social Sciences, 2017, University of New South Wales

Fiction, as one of the earliest diasporic Chinese literary genres as well as the most neglected one in current scholarships, is the focus of this research project. The thesis examines Chinese language fiction published in the three earliest Australian Chinese language newspapers from 1894 to 1912, when Australian Chinese diaspora experienced an initial plethora of urban cultural development. Through the thesis, I propose to show the incipient evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction and argue that the beginning of Chinese Australian writing should be redefined to the turn of the 20th century given its original and exemplary contribution to the development of a diasporic literary tradition in Australia. During these years, Australian Chinese language fiction evolved from a production largely derivative of the classical Chinese narrative tradition, to a modern and localised form through the influence and inspiration of the late Qing revolution in fiction. This achievement can be witnessed in the employment of modern narrative techniques and structures, in the incorporation of local lives and events into the stories, and in the hybridity of themes that mix traditional and modern interests such as exile and ethnic unity, which are rare in late Qing Chinese fiction but essential to the concerns of post-colonial and diasporic cultural studies. Demonstrating the value of early Australian Chinese language fiction offers a fresh angle to enrich our knowledge of the life experience of early Chinese migrants. It also reconnects such diasporic narratives with the modernising development of late Qing fiction in China as well as other early Chinese diasporic fiction, thus providing us an opportunity to discuss their mutual interaction and influence, as well as their role in the transnational development of world Chinese language literature. More importantly, it demonstrates how the localising process of the diasporic Chinese literary tradition began in Australia by supplementing the stories and other imaginative accounts of early Chinese migrants into the national literature of Australia, showing an alternative historical image of the Australian Chinese communities and a diversified vision of Australia’s social and cultural experience that was taking place already over a century ago. Advisors/Committee Members: Zheng, Yi, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Kowallis, Jon, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Chinese Australian writing; Australian Chinese Fiction; Diasporic Chinese fiction; Australian Chinese literature; Diasporic Chinese literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Luo, H. (2017). Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Luo, Haizhi. “Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Luo, Haizhi. “Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912.” 2017. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Luo H. Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Luo H. Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true


Macquarie University

2. Pan, Zijie Ken. Representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction 1973-2000: an analytical interpretation and a novella.

Degree: PhD, 2006, Macquarie University

Bibliography: p. 239-259.

Part One  – Introduction  – Representing Chinese men in the absence of the Aboriginal subject and in the guise of the racial fetish  – Carnival trouble and racial melancholy in The year of living dangerously  – Escaping Chinese patriarchy: the blind Chinese woman's journey to the West through Love and vertigo  – Masculine movements in Brian Castro's Birds of passage and After China  – Absenting the Chinese man in The ancestor game  – Part Two  – Prologue  – The migration of cuckoos.

The thesis examines a number of representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction in the years after the end of white Australia policy and up to the year 2000. Integrated with the thesis is a creative component of fiction. The theoretical and creative components are weighted equally at 50 per cent.  – The thesis is premised upon the assertion that two major spatial practices have historically shaped and continue to shape in different ways the national imaginary of Australians. These practices have been the dispossession of Aboriginal people upon European colonisation, and the institution of the white Australia policy which excluded immigrants of non-European, and specifically Asian and Pacific islands backgrounds. The thesis contends that despite the official end of the white Australia policy literary representations continue to configure Chinese men in various forms of exclusion.  – The thesis argues that the institutionalisation of multiculturalism has not repressed race-based attitudes, that since the end of the white Australia policy race remains textually alive and continues to affect people's lives in a conscious and not merely "subterranean" manner. The thesis examines the literary works of seven prominent Australian authors who have written novels with Chinese male characters. The thesis seeks to examine in this literature a particular manner of representation that is effected through a spatialisation bearing on the figure of the Chinese man. This spatialising effect produces a distancing from the centrality of whiteness and includes forms of marginalisation, orientalising, absence and loss through fetishism and melancholy, the search for a central Chinese masculine potency, and the appropriations of minority positions when the white narrating subject attempts to stand in and occupy the space of the Chinese male.  – The research and creative components integrate to explore the positionality of the Chinese male figure in Australian literature. The research component establishes, through analytical readings of selected Australian fiction, the confusion of incorporating the Chinese man within Australian society, lurching between acceptance and exclusion; the creative component tracks through the journey of its protagonist in Australian and Asian space, what might be a response of the Chinese male figure when exclusion and inclusion become unpredictable.

259 p

Advisors/Committee Members: Macquarie University. Dept. of English.

Subjects/Keywords: Australian fiction  – History and criticism; Men in literature; Chinese in literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pan, Z. K. (2006). Representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction 1973-2000: an analytical interpretation and a novella. (Doctoral Dissertation). Macquarie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/174423

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pan, Zijie Ken. “Representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction 1973-2000: an analytical interpretation and a novella.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Macquarie University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/174423.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pan, Zijie Ken. “Representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction 1973-2000: an analytical interpretation and a novella.” 2006. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Pan ZK. Representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction 1973-2000: an analytical interpretation and a novella. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Macquarie University; 2006. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/174423.

Council of Science Editors:

Pan ZK. Representations of Chinese men in Australian fiction 1973-2000: an analytical interpretation and a novella. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Macquarie University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/174423

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