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You searched for subject:(Aum Shinrikyo). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Boccardi, Andrea. Victimhood in the aftermath of Aum Japan: a social group creation through NPO's activities.

Degree: 2018, Leiden University

This thesis will examine the ways in which the concept of victimhood is produced by victims’ groups connected with the Aum affair and how it was received by Japanese media in terms of a renovated mutual understanding between victims and journalists, which resulted in an improvement of the victims’ treatment on information channels. The research takes into consideration the experience of three support groups (Chikatetsu Sarin Jiken Higaisha no Kai, Kanariya no Kai and RSC) that will be used as case studies to analyze the evolution and the impact they had both on victims’ lives and information media. It aims to investigate the role of NPOs and victims’ group activities in influencing public opinion regarding victims’ redressing issues. Furthermore, it intends to explore victims’ struggle against the proliferation of New Religious Movements derived from the disbanding of Aum Shinrikyō and constituted mainly by its former members, such as Hikari no Wa 光の環 and Aleph アレフ, which are suspected of harboring the same doctrines that led Aum to be a danger for Japanese society. In doing so, victims used memory, both individual and collective, as a tool to make their case and highlight their instances even when the attention towards the Aum affair declined in Japanese media. Memorial constructions regarding the incidents, commemorative events, documentaries and victims’ groups’ activities accounts established a legacy that goes beyond the individual experience as a victim or a perpetrator, rather producing a collective instance of victimhood. Advisors/Committee Members: Van der Veere, H (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Japan Society; Victimhood; New Religious Movement; Aum Shinrikyo; NPO; victim

…Coincidentally with the series of violent attacks perpetrated by Aum Shinrikyō, 1990s became a decade… …audiences and gain leverage with the State institutions.26 In the case of the Aum affair… …and the perceived organizational legitimacy of the victim group”.27 As for the Aum case… …credibility, salience and the purposes of Aum Shinrikyō victims’ groups. Thus, whereas in other… …the victims’ groups related to the Aum affair, although their claims were mostly directed to… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boccardi, A. (2018). Victimhood in the aftermath of Aum Japan: a social group creation through NPO's activities. (Masters Thesis). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/63688

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boccardi, Andrea. “Victimhood in the aftermath of Aum Japan: a social group creation through NPO's activities.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Leiden University. Accessed March 05, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/63688.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boccardi, Andrea. “Victimhood in the aftermath of Aum Japan: a social group creation through NPO's activities.” 2018. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Boccardi A. Victimhood in the aftermath of Aum Japan: a social group creation through NPO's activities. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Leiden University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/63688.

Council of Science Editors:

Boccardi A. Victimhood in the aftermath of Aum Japan: a social group creation through NPO's activities. [Masters Thesis]. Leiden University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/63688


Queensland University of Technology

2. Koschade, Stuart Andrew. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.

Degree: 2007, Queensland University of Technology

The rise of the 21st Century Islamic extremist movement, which was mobilised by the al-Qaeda attacks of and responses to September 11, 2001, heralds a new period in the history of terrorism. The increased frequency and intensity of this type of terrorism affects every nation in the world, not least Australia. Rising to meet the challenges posed by terrorism is the field of terrorism studies, the field which aims at understanding, explaining, and countering terrorism. Despite the importance of the field, it has been beleaguered with criticisms since its inception as a response to the rise of international terrorism. These criticisms specifically aim at the field's lack of objectivity, abstraction, levels of research, and levels of analysis. These criticisms were the impetus behind the adoption of the methodology of this thesis, which offers the distinct ability to understand, explain, and forecast the way in which terrorists interact within covert cells. Through social network analysis, this thesis examines four terrorist cells that have operated in or against Australia. These cells are from the groups Hrvatsko Revolucionarno Bratstvo (Croatian Revolutionary Brotherhood), Aum Shinrikyo (Supreme Truth), Lashkar-e-Taiba (Army of the Pure), and Jemaah Islamiyah (Islamic Community) and operated between 1963 and 2003. Essentially, this methodology attempts to discover, map, and analyse the interaction within the cells during the covert stage of their respective operations. Following this, the results are analysed through the traditional social network analysis frameworks to discover the internal dynamics of the cell and identify the critical nodes (leaders) within the cells. Destabilisation techniques are subsequently employed, targeting these critical nodes to establish the most effective disruption techniques from a counter-terrorism point of view. The major findings of this thesis are: (1) that cells with a focus on efficiency rather than covertness were more successful in completing their objectives (contrary to popular belief); and (2) betweenness centrality (control over the flow of communication) is a critical factor in identifying leaders within terrorist cells. The analysis also offered significant insight into how a Jemaah Islamiyah cell might operate effectively in Australia, as well as the importance of local contacts to terrorist operations and the significance of international counter-terrorism cooperation and coordination.

Subjects/Keywords: terrorism; terrorist cells; terrorism studies; social network analysis; Croatian Revolutionary Brotherhood; Ustashi; Ustasha; Aum Shinrikyo; Lashkar-e-Taiba; Jemaah Islamiyah; history of terrorism; Australia; destabilisation techniques; betweenness; critical node; counter-terrorism; Willie Brigitte; Faheem Khalid Lodhi; Shoko Asahara; Imam Samudra; Muklas; Bali bombing; Islamic extremism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koschade, S. A. (2007). The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koschade, Stuart Andrew. “The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.” 2007. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koschade, Stuart Andrew. “The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.” 2007. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Koschade SA. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2007. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Koschade SA. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2007. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Cambridge

3. Ushiyama, Rin. Memory struggles: Narrating and commemorating the Aum Affair in contemporary Japan, 1994-2015.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Cambridge

This dissertation investigates how different stakeholders have competed over the interpretation and commemoration of the Aum Affair. The Aum Affair was a series of crimes committed by new religious movement Aum Shinrikyō between 1988 and 1995, which culminated in the gassing of the Tokyo subway system using sarin in March 1995. The Tokyo attack was the largest act of terrorism in post-war Japan. I combine qualitative methods of media analysis, interviews, and participant observation to analyse how different stakeholders have narrated and commemorated the Aum Affair. I propose ‘collective trauma’ as a revised theory of ‘cultural trauma’ to describe an event which is represented as harmful and indelible to collective memory and identity. In contrast to ‘cultural trauma’, which stresses the importance of symbolic representations of traumatic events, ‘collective trauma’ considers other ‘material’ processes – such as establishing facts, collective action, state responses, and litigation – which also contribute to trauma construction. My overarching argument is that various stakeholders – including state authorities, mass media, public intellectuals, victims, and former Aum believers – have constructed the Aum Affair as a collective trauma in multiple and conflicting ways. Many media representations situated Aum as an evil ‘cult’ which ‘brainwashed’ believers and intended to take over Japan through terror. State authorities also responded by treating Aum as a dangerous terrorist group. In some instances, these binary representations of Japan locked in a struggle against an evil force led to municipal governments violating the civil rights of Aum believers. Some individuals such as public intellectuals and former believers have challenged this divisive view by treating Aum as a ‘religion’, not a ‘cult’, and locating the root causes of Aum’s growth in Japanese society. Additionally, victims and former members have pursued divergent goals such as retributive justice, financial reparations, and social reconciliation through their public actions. A key conclusion of this dissertation is that whilst confronting horrific acts of violence may require social construction of collective trauma using cultural codes of good and evil, the entrenchment of these symbolic categories can result in lasting social tension and division.

Subjects/Keywords: collective memory; aum shinrikyo; contemporary japan; japanese culture; sociology of religion; japanese religion; cultural trauma; cultural sociology; sociology of intellectuals; commemoration; Tokyo Sarin Incident; cultural studies; trauma theory; victimhood; public intellectuals; memorials

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ushiyama, R. (2017). Memory struggles: Narrating and commemorating the Aum Affair in contemporary Japan, 1994-2015. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/267895

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ushiyama, Rin. “Memory struggles: Narrating and commemorating the Aum Affair in contemporary Japan, 1994-2015.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed March 05, 2021. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/267895.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ushiyama, Rin. “Memory struggles: Narrating and commemorating the Aum Affair in contemporary Japan, 1994-2015.” 2017. Web. 05 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ushiyama R. Memory struggles: Narrating and commemorating the Aum Affair in contemporary Japan, 1994-2015. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 05]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/267895.

Council of Science Editors:

Ushiyama R. Memory struggles: Narrating and commemorating the Aum Affair in contemporary Japan, 1994-2015. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2017. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/267895

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