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You searched for subject:(Auditory Pathways physiology). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Hong Kong

1. Chen, Xiang-yang. FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain.

Degree: PhD, 1990, University of Hong Kong

published_or_final_version

Physiology

Doctoral

Doctor of Philosophy

Subjects/Keywords: Mesencephalon.; Rats - Physiology.; Auditory pathways.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, X. (1990). FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Hong Kong. Retrieved from Chen, X. [陳向陽]. (1990). FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/35083

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Xiang-yang. “FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain.” 1990. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Hong Kong. Accessed December 13, 2019. Chen, X. [陳向陽]. (1990). FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/35083.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Xiang-yang. “FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain.” 1990. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen X. FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Hong Kong; 1990. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: Chen, X. [陳向陽]. (1990). FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/35083.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen X. FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Hong Kong; 1990. Available from: Chen, X. [陳向陽]. (1990). FM sensitivities in the rat midbrain. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b3123216 ; http://hdl.handle.net/10722/35083


University of Western Sydney

2. Singh, Ram K. A real-time implementation of the primary auditory neuron activities.

Degree: 2012, University of Western Sydney

Computational models of the auditory pathway simulate the different stages of the auditory periphery, which includes the outer, middle and inner ear stages. The studies of the levels of the auditory pathway beyond the inner ear stages require the availability of data primarily of the cochlea response. If the computational model of the auditory pathway simulates the cochlea responses slowly, the responses of the higher levels of the auditory pathway will also be slow. Hence, a real-time computational model of the auditory pathway provides the capability to study higher levels of sound perception studies in the field of computational neuroscience by providing on-the-fly or immediate responses of the cochlea within the auditory pathway. In this thesis, the development of a real-time computational model of an auditory pathway is discussed. A review of five auditory pathway computer models is presented and a model is selected for implementation into a real-time computer model. The transition from the original model to a real-time implementation includes a translation to C language before being integrated with JUCE, a C++ graphical user interface library. The input signals in the real-time model are generated either through a software sine tone generator or acquired from a microphone channel on a computer. As part of cochlea simulation, the algorithms are divided to generate responses in channels. A large number of channels results in a finer resolution of spectral projection of the cochlea response. To achieve the optimum number of channels in real-time, POSIX threads are used to achieve computing parallelism. As part of optimisation to load more channels, mathematical optimisation is studied and utilised in the real-time model. It will be demonstrated in this thesis that the RMS errors of the responses of the developed real-time computer model of the auditory pathway as opposed to the original model measures below 1% and its maximum load is dependent on the computer it runs on. On a laptop with a dual core CPU, the real-time model is able to simulate 85 channels of the basilar membrane displacement whereas a desktop with a quicker dual core CPU model accommodates twice as many channels. With math optimisation enabled, there is 13% and 8% increase in the computation of channels for the laptop and desktop respectively. However, the RMS errors of the real-time model with math optimisation enabled and the original model increases to 8% due to approximation errors. Advisors/Committee Members: University of Western Sydney (Host institution), MARCS Institute (Host institution).

Subjects/Keywords: Thesis (M.Eng. (Hons.)) – University of Western Sydney, 2012; auditory pathways; cochlear; computer simulation; physiology; mathematical optimization; real-time data processing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Singh, R. K. (2012). A real-time implementation of the primary auditory neuron activities. (Thesis). University of Western Sydney. Retrieved from http://handle.uws.edu.au:8081/1959.7/523625

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Ram K. “A real-time implementation of the primary auditory neuron activities.” 2012. Thesis, University of Western Sydney. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://handle.uws.edu.au:8081/1959.7/523625.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Ram K. “A real-time implementation of the primary auditory neuron activities.” 2012. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Singh RK. A real-time implementation of the primary auditory neuron activities. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Sydney; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://handle.uws.edu.au:8081/1959.7/523625.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Singh RK. A real-time implementation of the primary auditory neuron activities. [Thesis]. University of Western Sydney; 2012. Available from: http://handle.uws.edu.au:8081/1959.7/523625

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


East Carolina University

3. Caldwell, Kelly A. Speech in noise ability, outer hair cell function, and working memory for trained flute players.

Degree: 2015, East Carolina University

The process of auditory speech recognition requires verbal ability, working memory, recall, and adequate auditory abilities to recognize speech. There is a well-known positive effect of musical training and experience on verbal working memory and speech recognition in noise compared to those without formal musical training. This study was conducted to determine the relationships between outer hair cell function, speech in noise ability, and working memory for flute players (N=12) and non-musician controls (N=10). The secondary purpose of this study is to determine the differences between flute players and matched controls on these three variables. Test included pure tone audiometry, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), working memory, and three speech in noise tests. Significant group differences were found between HINT thresholds using four talker babble in the Noise Front and Noise Right conditions. Non-musician controls were found to demonstrate a significant relationship between HINT 4T NF and bilateral high frequency DPOAEs. Flute players were found to demonstrate a significant negative relationship between working memory and outer hair cell function for the left ear, and a significant negative relationship between right high frequency DPOAEs and years of experience. Incidentally, the flute player group reported more perceived difficulty hearing speech in noise than the non-musician control group despite higher mean high frequency DPOAE response amplitudes than the controls. These data imply that another auditory or cognitive factor contributes to perceived difficulty recognizing speech in the presence of noise.

Subjects/Keywords: Audiology; Speech Therapy; Neuroscience; Auditory processing; Cognitive processing; Outer hair cells; Speech in noise; Working Memory; Speech Perception – physiology; Noise; Auditory Pathways – physiology; Memory, Short-Term – physiology; Perceptual Masking; Pitch Discrimination; Speech Reception Threshold Test; Otoacoustic Emission, Spontaneous; Music

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caldwell, K. A. (2015). Speech in noise ability, outer hair cell function, and working memory for trained flute players. (Thesis). East Carolina University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10342/4920

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caldwell, Kelly A. “Speech in noise ability, outer hair cell function, and working memory for trained flute players.” 2015. Thesis, East Carolina University. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10342/4920.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caldwell, Kelly A. “Speech in noise ability, outer hair cell function, and working memory for trained flute players.” 2015. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Caldwell KA. Speech in noise ability, outer hair cell function, and working memory for trained flute players. [Internet] [Thesis]. East Carolina University; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10342/4920.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Caldwell KA. Speech in noise ability, outer hair cell function, and working memory for trained flute players. [Thesis]. East Carolina University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10342/4920

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.