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You searched for subject:(Asian American Subjectivity). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of California – Berkeley

1. Clark, Audrey Wu. The Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American Literature.

Degree: English, 2010, University of California – Berkeley

AbstractThe Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American LiteraturebyAudrey Wu ClarkDoctor of Philosophy in EnglishUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Colleen Lye, Co-ChairProfessor Richard Cándida Smith, Co-ChairMy project traces a genealogy of universalism in early Asian American literature that led to the panethnic formation of the Asian American literary canon in the 1960s and 1970s. I contribute to the recent criticisms of panethnicity as the organizing principle of the field by arguing that the panethnic paradigm, based solely on the anachronistically imposed alliance of excluded diverse Asian ethnic groups, did not structure early Asian American literature. Instead, I argue that the authors of these early texts represented the racial particularity of their "Asian American" protagonists as universal. The protagonists' performances of universalism exposed the doubleness of American universalism – that is, the failed universalism that excluded racial minorities and the promised inclusive universalism that is yet to come. My conceptualization of Asian American universalism fortifies the theoretical aspect of the sociological paradigm of panethnicity by offering a different and more historically specific approach than the deconstructive readings of political resistance and melancholic abjection that have very recently theorized panethnicity. Since Americanism was conceived through liberal universalism during the period of Asian exclusion (1882-1943), becoming "Asian American" for these authors and their protagonists impossibly and yet productively universalized their racial particularity to their predominantly white audiences. For some critics, Asian American subjectivity is imagined through only the impossibility of Asian American universalism. By contrast, I argue that the Asian American is formed through the dialectic between racial particularity as an "alien ineligible to citizenship" and liberal universalism. The aim of the dialectic in each of the works I study is framed by the historical moment of each work's publication: In my first two chapters on Sui Sin Far's Mrs. Spring Fragrance and Sadakichi Hartmann's and Yone Noguchi's modernist haikus, I demonstrate that their protagonists and poetic personas attempt to claim space within the American literary imagination during the Progressive Era. In the latter two chapters, I examine the ways in which the protagonists of Dhan Gopal Mukerji's Caste and Outcast and Younghill Kang's East Goes West, and Carlos Bulosan's America Is in the Heart employ modernist forms of temporal nonlinearity to transcend the capitalist commodification of linear time during the Popular Front era. Through performances of American racial, gender, and class norms, all of the Asian American protagonists of my study not only reveal the exclusions and limitations of American universalism but also attempt to redeem it by articulating new sets of demands for racial, gender, and class…

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, American; Asian American Studies; Alternative Modernisms; Asian American Literature; Asian American Subjectivity; Early Asian American Literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clark, A. W. (2010). The Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American Literature. (Thesis). University of California – Berkeley. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5bd17375

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clark, Audrey Wu. “The Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American Literature.” 2010. Thesis, University of California – Berkeley. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5bd17375.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clark, Audrey Wu. “The Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American Literature.” 2010. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Clark AW. The Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American Literature. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2010. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5bd17375.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Clark AW. The Asian American Avant-Garde: Universalist Aspirations in Early Asian American Literature. [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2010. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5bd17375

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


UCLA

2. Perillo, Jeffrey Lorenzo. Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino.

Degree: Culture & Performance Studies, 2013, UCLA

New York-based African American, Latino, and Caribbean immigrant youth of the 1960s and early 1970s gave life to one of the world's major contemporary cultural movements: Hip-hop. Initially misunderstood as a faddish form of Black male musical expression, Hip-hop's cultural resistance practices were quickly recognized as four core elements (emceeing, turntablism, graffiti art, and b-boying/b-girling). In the global context, Hip-hop has generated scholarly discourse that points to either the cultural globalization of American Blackness or a "global village." My project interrupts this conversation and focuses on the unique, multi-site cultural history of Filipino identity as constituted through practitioners of Hip-Hop dance. My work argues that a community of Filipinos, situated in different geo-political loci – Berkeley, California, Honolulu, Hawai`i, and Manila, Philippines – configure prevailing concepts of Hip-hop while remaking conditions of dispossession and displacement in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. My study advances its argument through a theorization of remaking comprised of three broad themes – Hip-hop dance is part of a repertoire for Filipino race relations; decolonization is tied to Hip-hop's institutionalization; and dance offers an alternative perspective of Hip-hop's globalization. Using ethnography and choreographic analysis, I conduct close readings of select dances, dance events, and dancers in order to offer innovative views into the politics of race and culture. Specifically, I analyze the ways Filipinos in Berkeley remake the dominant racial paradigms of liberal multiculturalism and colorblindness with counter-hegemonic history and politics; Honolulu-based Filipinos creaate spaces for decolonization; and Filipinos in Manila rework the grammar of American neocolonialism to access otherwise proscribed spaces of gender and dance. Informed by fields of critical race studies, postcolonial studies, and performance studies, my dissertation uncovers the often neglected choreography of Filipinos to complement these fields and assert a practice-based approach to understanding global Hip-hop as a strategy for equality and social justice.

Subjects/Keywords: Dance; Asian American studies; Critical Dance Studies; Critical Race Studies; Filipino subjectivity; Globalization; Hip-hop dance; Postcolonialism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Perillo, J. L. (2013). Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16q5z7gp

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Perillo, Jeffrey Lorenzo. “Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino.” 2013. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16q5z7gp.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Perillo, Jeffrey Lorenzo. “Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino.” 2013. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Perillo JL. Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2013. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16q5z7gp.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Perillo JL. Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2013. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16q5z7gp

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


York University

3. Ngo, Anh Phung. The Entanglements of Canada's National Identity Building and Vietnamese Canadian Community Conflicts: Racial Capitalist Democracy and the Cold War Neoliberal Multicultural Subject.

Degree: PhD, Social Work, 2019, York University

This study weaves Cold War Epistemology, critical multiculturalism, racial capitalism, and critical refugee studies to theorize how the Vietnamese Canadian subjectivity is related to Canadas national identity formation. Adopting a critical ethnography methodology and discourse analysis, this study asks: What are the conditions of community conflicts within the Vietnamese community and how are those conflicts related to the processes of Canadian national identity formation? The production and contestation of Vietnamese Canadian subjectivity in the making of Canadian national identity is traced through three major sites of analysis. This first site is the debate on the Memorial to Victims of Communism as captured in the media. The second site is the parliamentary and community commemoration of the Fall of Saigon on April 30th, 1975 which includes debates on the Journey to Freedom Day Act and local community events. The final site is a Toronto community agency conflict of identity. This study reveals the logic of racial capitalist democracy underlying Canadian national identity as free, humanitarian, democratic, and peace-making. This is constructed through the production of Vietnamese Canadian subjectivity as a particular model minority and model refugee framed within Cold War neoliberal and multicultural discourse with significant consequences to the wellbeing of the community. Advisors/Committee Members: Wong, Yuk-Lin Renita (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian American studies; Vietnamese; national identity building; subjectivity; Cold War; Cold War epistemology; critical race; critical multiculturalism; racial capitalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ngo, A. P. (2019). The Entanglements of Canada's National Identity Building and Vietnamese Canadian Community Conflicts: Racial Capitalist Democracy and the Cold War Neoliberal Multicultural Subject. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/36708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ngo, Anh Phung. “The Entanglements of Canada's National Identity Building and Vietnamese Canadian Community Conflicts: Racial Capitalist Democracy and the Cold War Neoliberal Multicultural Subject.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed December 01, 2020. https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/36708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ngo, Anh Phung. “The Entanglements of Canada's National Identity Building and Vietnamese Canadian Community Conflicts: Racial Capitalist Democracy and the Cold War Neoliberal Multicultural Subject.” 2019. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Ngo AP. The Entanglements of Canada's National Identity Building and Vietnamese Canadian Community Conflicts: Racial Capitalist Democracy and the Cold War Neoliberal Multicultural Subject. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2019. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/36708.

Council of Science Editors:

Ngo AP. The Entanglements of Canada's National Identity Building and Vietnamese Canadian Community Conflicts: Racial Capitalist Democracy and the Cold War Neoliberal Multicultural Subject. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2019. Available from: https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/36708

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